The Tjanpi Women Desert Weavers of Australia.

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The Tjanpi Desert Weavers
Building on the traditions of using natural fibres to create objects for medicinal, ceremonial and daily use, the Tjanpi – or ‘dry grass’ – Weavers are women who come together to visit sacred sites and traditional homelands, hunt and gather food for their families and teach their children about country while collecting grasses to sculpt and weave.
Students will work directly with the accomplished artists to learn new techniques and expand upon their own diverse disciplines in painting, drawing, music, sculpture and spatial practice as well as film and television.
Tiriki Onus, Lecturer in Indigenous Knowledge and Cultural Practices at the Wilin Centre for Indigenous Arts and Cultural Development, says the masterclasses are a precious experience for budding artists.
“Too often there is a false distinction drawn between craft and fine art.
The women from the Tjanpi Desert Weavers are contemporary fine artists, as well as seasoned teachers, performers and cultural ambassadors who not only maintain traditions within their own art form but also innovate upon them. We are incredibly lucky to be facilitating their presentation of masterclasses at the Wilin Centre.”
Today there are over 400 women across 28 communities making baskets and sculptures out of grass. Working with fibre in this way is firmly embedded in Western and Central Desert Indigenous culture.
via Indigenous weavers give insight into contemporary Australian art | The Melbourne Newsroom.

Boudicca the Warrior Queen of the Iceni, England.

Boudicca was queen of the Iceni people of Eastern England and led a major uprising against occupying Roman forces.
Boudicca was married to Prasutagus, ruler of the Iceni people of East Anglia.
When the Romans conquered southern England in AD 43, they allowed Prasutagus to continue to rule.
However, when Prasutagus died the Romans decided to rule the Iceni directly and confiscated the property of the leading tribesmen.
They are also said to have stripped and flogged Boudicca and raped her daughters. These actions exacerbated widespread resentment at Roman rule.
In 60 or 61 AD, while the Roman governor Gaius Suetonius Paullinus was leading a campaign in North Wales, the Iceni rebelled. Members of other tribes joined them.
Boudicca’s warriors successfully defeated the Roman Ninth Legion and destroyed the capital of Roman Britain, then at Colchester.
They went on to destroy London and Verulamium (St Albans). Thousands were killed.
Finally, Boudicca was defeated by a Roman army led by Paulinus.
Many Britons were killed and Boudicca is thought to have poisoned herself to avoid capture.
The site of the battle, and of Boudicca’s death, are unknown.
via BBC History

Woman and Child, Pibor, South Sudan.

Pibor, South Sudan
A displaced woman looks at her child, who is hiding behind her dress, in a school now occupied by internally displaced people after heavy rains and floods forced hundreds of thousands of people to leave their homes in the town of Pibor.
Photograph: Andreea Câmpeanu/Reuters
Source: 20 photographs of the week | Art and design | The Guardian

The Beautiful and Charismatic Lilli Langtry.

Lillie Langtry was beautiful, smart, had wit and passion all  in one mesmerizing package.
Langtry was a stage actress persuaded to go into the acting business by famed writer and poet Oscar Wilde.
As her popularity grew, more people started to gravitate towards Langtry, because of her charisma and undeniable beauty.
Whenever she entered the room at a party, all eyes were on her.
Without even asking for permission, people were drawing and painting portraits of Langtry, which quickly became postcard favourites.
But it took more than just looks for Langtry to catch the eye of Albert Edward, the Prince of Wales and later King of the United Kingdom.
Around 1877, Langtry became the semi-official mistress of the Prince because, back then, those sorts of things happened.
She wasn’t just arm-candy, of course, and often reportedly engaged Albert in meaningful conversations, and delighted him with her wit.
Even more amazingly, she is said to have had a pretty good relationship with the Prince’s wife.
Read and see more via vintage everyday: Top 10 Famous Beauties of the 19th Century

Uproar over Katherine Switzer running in 1967 Boston Marathon.

bizarre-photos-in-history-switzer-boston-marathon
A very brave Katherine Switzer made waves when she entered the Boston Marathon in 1967, at a time when women were not “supposed” to run marathons.
This iconic shot shows Boston Marathon organizer Jock Semple vehemently accosting Switzer to get out of the race.
According to Switzer’s own personal account of the event, Semple swiped at her bib and yelled: “Get the hell out of my race and give me those numbers”.
via 15 Of History’s Most Bizarre Photos.

Ladies on Bikes in Chicago, circa 1895.

Don’ts for Women on Bicycles in 1895The women’s rights advocate Susan B. Anthony may have said that the bicycle did “more to emancipate women than anything else in the world”, but the road along which it travelled was a bumpy one.
On 21st June 1895, the Newark Sunday Advocate ran the following article:
The Unique Cycling club of Chicago is all that its name implies.
One of its laws is that on all runs bloomers and knickerbockers shall be worn, and two members who disobeyed this rule recently met with a punishment that they will not forget soon.

Union park was the rendezvous for the last run, and 50 members turned out. The president, Miss Bunker, observed two women wearing short skirts over their bloomers.
“Take the skirts off,” ordered Captain Bunker.
“Indeed we won’t,” was the reply.
A crowd of 200 had collected to see the start.
The president and the captain held a consultation, and then, taking several strong armed members with them, fell on the skirt wearers and stripped them down to their bloomers.
“It was done in all seriousness,” said Mrs. Langdon. “The club’s rules are made to be kept and not to be broken. Why did we take off the skirts in public?
For no other reason but to make examples of the offenders. They publicly defied our rules and were punished accordingly.”
via vintage everyday: A List of Don’ts for Women on Bicycles in 1895.