Woman and Child, Pibor, South Sudan.

Pibor, South Sudan
A displaced woman looks at her child, who is hiding behind her dress, in a school now occupied by internally displaced people after heavy rains and floods forced hundreds of thousands of people to leave their homes in the town of Pibor.
Photograph: Andreea Câmpeanu/Reuters
Source: 20 photographs of the week | Art and design | The Guardian

The Beautiful and Charismatic Lilli Langtry.

Lillie Langtry was beautiful, smart, had wit and passion all  in one mesmerizing package.
Langtry was a stage actress persuaded to go into the acting business by famed writer and poet Oscar Wilde.
As her popularity grew, more people started to gravitate towards Langtry, because of her charisma and undeniable beauty.
Whenever she entered the room at a party, all eyes were on her.
Without even asking for permission, people were drawing and painting portraits of Langtry, which quickly became postcard favourites.
But it took more than just looks for Langtry to catch the eye of Albert Edward, the Prince of Wales and later King of the United Kingdom.
Around 1877, Langtry became the semi-official mistress of the Prince because, back then, those sorts of things happened.
She wasn’t just arm-candy, of course, and often reportedly engaged Albert in meaningful conversations, and delighted him with her wit.
Even more amazingly, she is said to have had a pretty good relationship with the Prince’s wife.
Read and see more via vintage everyday: Top 10 Famous Beauties of the 19th Century

Uproar over Katherine Switzer running in 1967 Boston Marathon.

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A very brave Katherine Switzer made waves when she entered the Boston Marathon in 1967, at a time when women were not “supposed” to run marathons.
This iconic shot shows Boston Marathon organizer Jock Semple vehemently accosting Switzer to get out of the race.
According to Switzer’s own personal account of the event, Semple swiped at her bib and yelled: “Get the hell out of my race and give me those numbers”.
via 15 Of History’s Most Bizarre Photos.

Ladies on Bikes in Chicago, circa 1895.

Don’ts for Women on Bicycles in 1895The women’s rights advocate Susan B. Anthony may have said that the bicycle did “more to emancipate women than anything else in the world”, but the road along which it travelled was a bumpy one.
On 21st June 1895, the Newark Sunday Advocate ran the following article:
The Unique Cycling club of Chicago is all that its name implies.
One of its laws is that on all runs bloomers and knickerbockers shall be worn, and two members who disobeyed this rule recently met with a punishment that they will not forget soon.

Union park was the rendezvous for the last run, and 50 members turned out. The president, Miss Bunker, observed two women wearing short skirts over their bloomers.
“Take the skirts off,” ordered Captain Bunker.
“Indeed we won’t,” was the reply.
A crowd of 200 had collected to see the start.
The president and the captain held a consultation, and then, taking several strong armed members with them, fell on the skirt wearers and stripped them down to their bloomers.
“It was done in all seriousness,” said Mrs. Langdon. “The club’s rules are made to be kept and not to be broken. Why did we take off the skirts in public?
For no other reason but to make examples of the offenders. They publicly defied our rules and were punished accordingly.”
via vintage everyday: A List of Don’ts for Women on Bicycles in 1895.

The Women of Woodstock, 1969.

girls-of-woodstock-1969-41 The 1969 event was undoubtedly one of the most formative moments in music history, but as we’ve learned with most music festivals, they lend themselves to some pretty awesome style-spotting.
girls-of-woodstock-1969-40Long before the concept of street style or even festival style existed, Woodstock showcased inspiring women wearing sweet bell bottoms, crop tops and knit dresses.

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girls-of-woodstock-1969-18Source: vintage everyday: Girls of Woodstock – The Best Beauty and Style Moments from 1969

It’s a Lonely Life on the Plains for May.

Come-by-Chance, Australia
May McKeown looks up at the stars as she stands in the front yard of her 6,000 acre property.
May, aged 78, lives and works on her property mostly alone as her son is constantly traveling.
She inspects the property and hand-feeds her cattle daily, writing poems in her spare time about her lonely life on the flat north-west plains.
Image Credit: Photograph by David Gray/Reuters
Source: The 20 photographs of the week | Art and design | The Guardian