Lest We Forget: The Graves of Fromelles, 1916.

Graves at Fromelles, France following the infamous battle of July 1916.  Photo: (Supplied: Chandler Collection)
This week marks 103 years since the World War I battles of Fromelles and Pozieres — two of the deadliest and most gruesome in Australia’s military history.
In an attempt to feint and distract German forces who were battling the French and British on the Somme in the south, Australian forces were sent into Fromelles, about 100 kilometres north, at 6:00pm on July 19, 1916.
It was Australia’s introduction to the Western Front — the main theatre of the war — after spending months fighting in Gallipoli, and the results were disastrous.
Continue reading via Source: Fromelles and Pozieres: A look back at two of Australia’s bloodiest WWI offensives – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

The Scilly & Netherlands Fake war lasted 335 years.

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This war was fought between the Netherlands and the Isle of Scilly, which is located off the southwest coast of Great Britain.
The war started in 1651, but like many wars of that era it was not taken seriously and soon forgotten about.
Three centuries passed before the two countries finally agreed to a peace treaty in 1986, making their war the longest in human history.
War duration: (1651-1986) Three hundred and thirty-five years. Casualties: None.

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Scilly is probably Britain’s best-kept secret.
A sub-tropical paradise just 28 miles southwest of Lands End – this has to be the ‘perfect holiday’ destination.
Sub-tropical Climate, White Sand Beaches, Peace and Tranquility.
If you are looking for beautiful white beaches, exotic sub-tropical plants and a quality of life that is difficult to find in this busy World, then the Isles of Scilly are your destination of choice.
There are five inhabited islands in the archipelago, set amongst hundreds of smaller islands and rocky islets, which provide homes to numerous species of seabirds and marine animals.
via Listverse and Cornwall Online 

Red Flag Over Berlin, May, 1945.

Soviet soldiers raising the red flag over the Reichstag, May 1945.
Photograph by Yevgeny Khaldei: The David King Collection at Tate
There is an unforgettable photograph of a Soviet soldier raising the red flag over the Reichstag near the end of this momentous exhibition.
The soldier crouches at a terrifying angle to hang his victorious banner above burned-out Berlin in May 1945.
It is a famous shot – the figure high among the parapets beneath a thunderous sky – and known to have been staged, like the marines hoisting the flag at Iwo Jima.
But in this context, one sees it completely new.
The photographer was Jewish. His father and sisters had been murdered by the Nazis.
His uncle made the flag by hand, the hammer and sickle glowing an immaculate white almost at the epicentre of this dark image.
And what has inspired Yevgeny Khaldei is not just the possibility of raising the figure high among the parapets, a worker on the same level as the imperial statues, but the dynamic geometries of Russian abstract art.
His scene is all triangles and heroic diagonals, harking back to El Lissitzky and Malevich.
Read on via Red Star Over Russia: A Revolution in Visual Culture 1905-55 review – a momentous show | Art and design | The Guardian

Mateship – Gallipoli 1915.

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Gallipoli 1915, An Australian carrying his wounded mate to a medical aid post for treatment, Gallipoli, 1915
Photograph: Lt. Ernest Brooks/IWM via Getty Images.
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So, where was Gallipoli, it was in Turkey and the map below gives you more of an idea of it’s location.
Whatever, it was a bloody long way from Australia for these brave blokes.
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via Imperial War Museum.

Australian women in WWI.

Nurse Clarice Daley and Sergeant Ernest Lawrence married in October 1915.
Clarice of No 3 Australian General hospital and Ernest, of the 1st Light Brigade Headquarters had known each other in Melbourne but their match was not well regarded by Clarice’s family.
Ernest enlisted in August 1914 and much had been experienced by the time the two met again.
Ernest returned to Australia in November 1918 and the two commenced their life together, going on to have four children.
Their marriage certificate is held in the private records collection of the Australian War Memorial.
Source: Australian women of the first world war – in pictures | UK news | The Guardian