Mateship – Gallipoli 1915.

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Gallipoli 1915, An Australian carrying his wounded mate to a medical aid post for treatment, Gallipoli, 1915
Photograph: Lt. Ernest Brooks/IWM via Getty Images.
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So, where was Gallipoli, it was in Turkey and the map below gives you more of an idea of it’s location.
Whatever, it was a bloody long way from Australia for these brave blokes.
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via Imperial War Museum.

Australian women in WWI.

Nurse Clarice Daley and Sergeant Ernest Lawrence married in October 1915.
Clarice of No 3 Australian General hospital and Ernest, of the 1st Light Brigade Headquarters had known each other in Melbourne but their match was not well regarded by Clarice’s family.
Ernest enlisted in August 1914 and much had been experienced by the time the two met again.
Ernest returned to Australia in November 1918 and the two commenced their life together, going on to have four children.
Their marriage certificate is held in the private records collection of the Australian War Memorial.
Source: Australian women of the first world war – in pictures | UK news | The Guardian

WWI: Torrens Island Work Camp for German POW’s.

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The measures taken against German-Australians in South Australia
During the first World War, German settlers in South Australia and Australia became known as ‘the enemy within’ and extreme measures were put in place to deal with the threat felt by the predominately-British population.
The names of places that had been named by Germans were changed and German settlers were interned or deported and taken to work camps on Torrens Island.
Torrens Island detention camp was set up and held 400 german men during the First World War.
German established schools were closed, the German language was no longer taught in schools and German’s lost the right to vote.
Because of this German families began to change their name as a means of avoiding persecution and to prove their commitment to their new home.
If you were a German-born resident of Australia you had to register at your local police station, and most German-descendents were treated in similar ways.
German residents of Australia were inflicted with hostile attitudes even if they were naturalised and had sons and brothers fighting for the Australian Infantry Force.
Australian authoritities would target German residents with unjustified searches, survelliance and arrest.
During the war 4500 Germans in Australia were interned- 700 were naturalised and 70 were Australian born.
via WW1- The Home Front: Anti-German Sentiment.

Ned Parfelt, Newsboy & Soldier, 1896-1918

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The newsboy was Ned Parfett, born in 1896, and one of four brothers from Cornwall Road, Waterloo.
Tragically, six and a half years after this picture was taken, Ned was killed while serving with the British army in France. He was 22.
Ned enlisted in the Royal Field Artillery in 1916, serving as a despatch driver then moving onto reconnaissance duties.
He was awarded the Military Medal and mentioned in despatches for his gallant conduct during a series of missions at the front.
He died on 29 October 1918, just two weeks before the end of the war, when a shell landed on the Quartermaster’s stores as he was picking up some clothes before going on leave.
After his death, the officer who recommended Ned for special recognition wrote to one of his brothers:
‘On many occasions he accompanied me during severe shelling and I always placed the greatest confidence in him.’
Ned Parfett is buried in the British war cemetery at Verchain-Maugré in France.
via Titanic | The National Archives.

Australian Families fight to repatriate remains of Korean Vets..

Photo: Private John Philip Saunders (centre) was reported missing in action on the Korean Peninsula in January 1953. (Supplied: Ian Saunders)
The search for answers.
“I just want closure — all the families feel the same way,” says Ian Saunders OAM.
His father, Private John Philip Saunders, was one day shy of 26 when he was reported missing on the Korean Peninsula in January 1953.
Now 73, Ian Saunders has used official Canberra war diaries and declassified Australian and United States military documents to try to piece together what happened to his father and other missing servicemen.
He has become a leading voice in the families’ campaign to repatriate remains, and is unhappy with the pace of Australia’s investigation into its missing.
“It’s taken too long,” Mr Saunders says.”[Australia has] recovered and identified remains, if we can, in all the wars that Australians have served in since the Boer War.
“So, why hasn’t the government done anything about it is a very good question.”
Source: Decades after the ‘forgotten’ Korean War, families of missing Australians fight to repatriate remains – RN – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)