“Winter at the Flatiron”.

FlatironJonas1In the midst of a Winter Storm, photographer Michele Palazzo braved the blustery weather in hopes that he’d capture a one-of-a-kind shot.
Fortunately, he came across New York City’s Flatiron Building and that’s when something magical happened.
As tufts of snow swirled in the wind, Palazzo aimed his Ricoh GR camera and photographed the building, surrounding streets, and meteorological conditions.
After enhancing the image in VSCO Cam, the artist noticed that the snow swirls created patterns resembling swift brush strokes.
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As a whole, the photograph incredibly echoes an impressionist painting.
If you look closely, you’ll notice that the Flatiron’s windows feature an origami installation by artist Chelsea Hrynick Browne.
Her hand-cut paper creations perfectly add to the otherworldly, Winter Storm moment.
All photos via Michele Palazzo.

Source: NYC Winter Storm Photo Remarkably Resembles an Impressionist Painting – My Modern Met

“Brown bear cub on guard.”

Photo © Karen Moy. All rights reserved.
Brown bear cub on guard during the Salmon Run.
Bears are able to survive in the wilderness with the annual Alaskan Salmon Run without disturbance from humans in their natural environment.
Source: Brown bear cub on guard during the Salmon Run | Smithsonian Photo Contest | Smithsonian

“Glaciers, Fjords, and Wildlife”.

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Harbor seals bask on an iceberg as the fog rolls in near Bear Glacier in Kenai Fjords National Park. Photo credit: Jonathan Irish
A lot of people ask us what has been our favorite park so far this year and that question is practically impossible to answer because each park is so special in its own way.
Perhaps a better way to answer that question, or to even ask it of ourselves, is to tweak it a bit—“what park would you have wished you had more time to spend in and definitely want to go back to?”

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That seems more appropriate… Kenai Fjords National Park in Alaska is definitely one of them.
This park and its surrounding area has some huge draws for the outdoor set—great camping, a cool local scene, and pristine Alaskan wilderness sprawling into the mountains and to the seas.
These are just a few of the reasons people want to visit the Kenai Peninsula.
The things that motivate us to return are the experiences had while there… once you experience the landscape, you will undoubtedly want to explore it more in a variety of different ways.
Source: Glaciers, Fjords, and Wildlife: 3 Adventures in Kenai Fjords National Park | The Huffington Post

The Strange Death of Edgar Allan Poe.

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It was raining in Baltimore on October 3, 1849, but that didn’t stop Joseph W. Walker, a compositor for the Baltimore Sun, from heading out to Gunner’s Hall, a public house bustling with activity.
It was Election Day, and Gunner’s Hall served as a pop-up polling location for the 4th Ward polls. When Walker arrived at Gunner’s Hall, he found a man, delirious and dressed in shabby second-hand clothes, lying in the gutter.
The man was semi-conscious, and unable to move, but as Walker approached the him, he discovered something unexpected: the man was Edgar Allan Poe.
Worried about the health of the addled poet, Walker stopped and asked Poe if he had any acquaintances in Baltimore that might be able to help him.
Poe gave Walker the name of Joseph E. Snodgrass, a magazine editor with some medical training.
Immediately, Walker penned Snodgrass a letter asking for help.
Baltimore City, Oct. 3, 1849
Dear Sir,
There is a gentleman, rather the worse for wear, at Ryan’s 4th ward polls, who goes under the cognomen of Edgar A. Poe, and who appears in great distress, & he says he is acquainted with you, he is in need of immediate assistance.
Yours, in haste,
JOS. WALKER
On September 27—almost a week earlier—Poe had left Richmond, Virginia bound for Philadelphia to edit a collection of poems for Mrs. St. Leon Loud, a minor figure in American poetry at the time.
When Walker found Poe in delirious disarray outside of the polling place, it was the first anyone had heard or seen of the poet since his departure from Richmond. Poe never made it to Philadelphia to attend to his editing business.
Nor did he ever make it back to New York, where he had been living, to escort his aunt back to Richmond for his impending wedding.
Poe was never to leave Baltimore, where he launched his career in the early 19th- century, again—and in the four days between Walker finding Poe outside the public house and Poe’s death on October 7, he never regained enough consciousness to explain how he had come to be found, in soiled clothes not his own, incoherent on the streets.
Instead, Poe spent his final days wavering between fits of delirium, gripped by visual hallucinations. The night before his death, according to his attending physician Dr. John J. Moran, Poe repeatedly called out for “Reynolds”—a figure who, to this day, remains a mystery.
Read on via The (Still) Mysterious Death of Edgar Allan Poe | History | Smithsonian.

America’s Great 1930s Depression.

The Farm Security Administration (FSA) was created in 1937 from an earlier agency named the Resettlement Administration, or RA.
The RA had been created by a 1935 executive order of President Franklin D. Roosevelt to help struggling farmers and sharecroppers by providing loans, purchasing depleted farmland and resettling destitute families into government-designed communities.
Rexford G. Tugwell, a former Columbia University economics professor, was chosen by Roosevelt to lead the RA, and Tugwell appointed his former student and friend Roy K. Stryker to head the agency’s historical section.
Stryker’s mission was to document the hardships and conditions around the country, particularly across the Midwestern states and into California.
In all, Stryker’s team of photographers produced over 175,000 black and white negatives and 1,610 color transparencies, as well as several films.
Source: vintage everyday: 15 Amazing Vintage Photographs That Capture America’s Great Depression from the 1930s

“Cherry Blossoms”.

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Washington DC, United States – Cherry blossom trees are seen before dawn at the Tidal Basin.
The District’s cherry blossom festival, which began on 20 March and commemorates the 1912 gift of 3,000 cherry trees from Mayor Yukio Ozaki of Tokyo to the city of Washington:
Photograph: Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA

See more via Photo highlights of the day: cherry blossom and butterflies | News | The Guardian