Magical Forest.

Davies_05Ellie Davies’ studio is the forest, creating magical, fairytale-like stills throughout the United Kingdom.
Davies has been exploring this terrain for the past seven years, attempting to uncover the complex interrelationships between landscape and the individual.
Davies creates both temporary and non-invasive interventions within each forested scene.
By incorporating pools of light, smoke, and craft materials she places the viewer in the liminal space between reality and fantasy, a re-exploration of the natural world around us.
In her series Stars, the artist overlays her own photography with stars plucked from imagery taken by the Hubble space telescope. These mystical images are created in order to encourage pause, and provoke thoughts about how landscapes influences our identity.
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Davies lives in London and received her MA in Photography from London College of Communications in 2008.
She is represented by several international galleries including A.Galerie in Paris, Crane Kalman Brighton, Sophie Maree Gallery in The Netherlands, Brucie Collections in Kiev, and Art Gemini, Singapore.
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via Ellie Davies Creates Forest Landscapes Illuminated with Fields of Stars and Smoke | Colossal.

Joseph Moxon, Royal Printer, 1627-1691.

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Joseph Moxon (8 August 1627 – February 1691), hydrographer (mapper of oceans)  to Charles II, was an English printer of mathematical books and maps, a maker of globes and mathematical instruments, and mathematical lexicographer.
He produced the first English language dictionary devoted to mathematics.
In November 1678, he became the first tradesman to be elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society.
Between the ages of around 9 and 11, Moxon accompanied his father, James Moxon, to Delft and Rotterdam where he was printing English Bibles.
It was at this time that Moxon learned the basics of printing.
After the First English Civil War the family returned to London and Moxon and his older brother, James, started a printing business which specialized in the publication of Puritan texts, with the notable exception of A Book of Drawing, Limning, Washing or Colouring of Mapps and Prints of 1647 which was produced for Thomas Jenner, a seller of maps.
In 1652, Moxon visited Amsterdam and commissioned the engraving of globe-printing plates, and by the end of the year was selling large celestial and terrestrial globes in a new business venture.
He specialized in the printing of maps and charts, and in the production of globes, and mathematical instruments made of paper.
In January 1662, he was appointed hydrographer to the King, despite his Puritan background.
His shop at this time was on Ludgate Hill ; afterwards, in 1683, it was ‘on the west side of Fleet Ditch,’ but always ‘at the sign of Atlas.’
Moxon’s 1683 book, Mechanick Exercises, provides descriptions of contemporary printing methods that have proved useful for bibliographers.
via Joseph Moxon – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

‘The King’ poses for portrait before Castleton Garland Day March.

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The King’, Johnathon Haddock, poses for a portrait with the Garland before the procession during Castleton Garland Day in the village in Derbyshire.
The first records of Garland day date back to the 1700s and though its true origins are not fully understood, it is believed to be an ancient fertility rite with Celtic connections.
The garland is a framework of cut flowers which is prepared on the day by villagers before being placed on the head of the ‘King’, who is paraded around the town on horseback with his ‘Consort’, also on horseback, dressed in Stuart costume.
Image Credit: Photograph by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
Source: The 20 photographs of the week | Art and design | The Guardian

The forgotten ‘Enchantress of Numbers’ 1815-1852.

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Ada Byron was the daughter of a brief marriage between the Romantic poet Lord Byron and Anne Isabelle Milbanke, who separated from Byron just a month after Ada was born.
Four months later, Byron left England forever. Ada never met her father (who died in Greece in 1823) and was raised by her mother, Lady Byron.
Her life was an apotheosis of struggle between emotion and reason, subjectivism and objectivism, poetics and mathematics, ill health and bursts of energy.
Lady Byron wished her daughter to be unlike her poetical father, and she saw to it that Ada received tutoring in mathematics and music, as disciplines to counter dangerous poetic tendencies. But Ada’s complex inheritance became apparent as early as 1828, when she produced the design for a flying machine.
It was mathematics that gave her life its wings. Lady Byron and Ada moved in an elite London society, one in which gentlemen not members of the clergy or occupied with politics or the affairs of a regiment were quite likely to spend their time and fortunes pursuing botany, geology, or astronomy.
In the early nineteenth century there were no “professional” scientists (indeed, the word “scientist” was only coined by William Whewell in 1836)–but the participation of noblewomen in intellectual pursuits was not widely encouraged.

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One of the gentlemanly scientists of the era was to become Ada’s lifelong friend. Charles Babbage, (pictured above) Lucasian professor of mathematics at Cambridge, was known as the inventor of the Difference Engine, an elaborate calculating machine that operated by the method of finite differences.
Ada met Babbage in 1833, when she was just 17, and they began a voluminous correspondence on the topics of mathematics, logic, and ultimately all subjects.
In 1835, Ada married William King, ten years her senior, and when King inherited a noble title in 1838, they became the Earl and Countess of Lovelace. Ada had three children. The family and its fortunes were very much directed by Lady Byron, whose domineering was rarely opposed by King.
Babbage had made plans in 1834 for a new kind of calculating machine (although the Difference Engine was not finished), an Analytical Engine. His Parliamentary sponsors refused to support a second machine with the first unfinished, but Babbage found sympathy for his new project abroad.

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In 1842, an Italian mathematician, Louis Menebrea, published a memoir in French on the subject of the Analytical Engine (pictured above). Babbage enlisted Ada as translator for the memoir, and during a nine-month period in 1842-43, she worked feverishly on the article and a set of Notes she appended to it.
These are the source of her enduring fame. Ada called herself “an Analyst (and Metaphysician),” and the combination was put to use in the Notes. She understood the plans for the device as well as Babbage but was better at articulating its promise. She rightly saw it as what we would call a general-purpose computer.
It was suited for “developing and tabulating any function whatever. . . the engine [is] the material expression of any indefinite function of any degree of generality and complexity.” Her Notes anticipate future developments, including computer-generated music.
Ada died of cancer in 1852, at the age of 37, and was buried beside the father she never knew.
Her contributions to science were resurrected only recently, but many new biographies* attest to the fascination of Babbage’s “Enchantress of Numbers.”
Source: Ada Lovelace: Founder of Scientific Computing

A Beautiful Morning in Berkshire.

Sometimes you have to get up early to get the best shots – like this one, taken as the sun came up over the Lambourn gallops.
The gallops, owned by the Jockey Club and situated near Upper Lambourn in Berkshire, are used by trainers to prepare horses for racing.
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A general view of racehorses training on the Lambourn gallops as the sun begins to rise.
Image Credit: Photograph by Alan Crowhurst/Getty Images
Steven Bloor
via Sport picture of the day: Oh, what a beautiful morning | Sport | The Guardian.