Ono’s Giant Turtle of Junk.

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Indonesian artist Ono Gaf works primarily with metallic junk reclaimed from a trash heap to create his animalistic sculptures.
His most recent piece is this giant turtle containing hundreds of individual metal components like car parts, tools, bike parts, instruments, springs, and tractor rotors.
You can read a bit more about Gaf over on the Jakarta Post, and see more of this turtle in this set of photos by Gina Sanderson. (via Steampunk Tendencies).
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See more via A Towering Turtle of Discarded Industrial Junk Welded by Ono Gaf | Colossal.

Calligraphy in the Air.

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“Fraternité – Brotherhood,” Arabic calligraphy. Jodpur – India (2012).
In a stunning series of images that blend photography, calligraphy, and performance art, Nantes-based artist Julien Breton (aka Kaalam) uses light and dance to “paint” beautiful and fleeting characters into the air.
Inspired by a combination of Latin and Arabic writing styles, each piece is captured on long-exposure film while the artist creates his inscriptions using colored lamps and careful, intention-filled movements

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“Dead’s Place,” Abstract calligraphy, New York – USA (2012).
As a living, artistic response to the environment, the designs are matched in compositional harmony to the surrounding backdrop, be it an underpass in New York, an abandoned building in France, or a magnificent hall in India.
Each performance lasts several minutes and is then transformed into a single frame, transcending the boundaries of time and our perception of light.

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“La beauté – The Beauty,” Arabic calligraphy, Tetouan – Marocco (2015).
All photographs by David Gallard. (Via designboom)
Read on and see more Images via Julien Breton Creates Brilliant Calligraphy In The Air Using Colored Light And Expressive Dance – Beautiful/Decay.

Glued On Paris Art .

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I like the way the street artists of Paris now glue paper of their work on Paris walls instead of painting them with spray paint.
It allows passers by to discover new artists without damaging the walls, nor costing money to tax payers (for the city has to clean these walls eventually, no matter what).
I really love this one, shame that it’s not signed.
via ParisDailyPhoto: Street art.