‘Floodlit’ at Millmoor Stadium.

2fe269ae-72f8-4940-96ed-e3c2efcf46e2-2060x1428Around the floodlit grounds, by Ian Hughes
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As he drove past the old Rotherham United stadium of Millmoor in 2004, photographer Ian Hughes was so captivated by the light pouring out of it that he jumped out of the car to take a picture.
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See more Images via Pictures of the week: Around the floodlit grounds, by Ian Hughes | Art and design | The Guardian

Surfing a Record Breaking Wave.

Your Shot photographer Tó Mané captured this iconic image of Garrett McNamara, a professional big wave surfer, in Praia do Norte, Nazaré, Portugal.
This image features McNamara breaking his own world record of riding a giant wave by surfing this 100 foot wave.
His original record was riding a wave of 78 foot just two years prior to this image being taken.
Source: Editors’ Spotlight — National Geographic Your Shot

Liverpool celebrates UEFA Win.

Liverpool, England
Liverpool players and staff are driven through the centre of the city in an open-top bus to celebrate the team winning the UEFA Champions League.Image Credit: Photograph by Danny Lawson/PA
Liverpool Football Club is a professional football club in Liverpool, England, that competes in the Premier League, the top tier of English football.
The club has won six European Cups, more than any other English club, three UEFA Cups, three UEFA Super Cups, eighteen League titles, seven FA Cups, a record eight League Cups, fifteen FA Community Shields and one Football League Super Cup.
Founded in 1892, the club joined the Football League the following year and has played at Anfield Oval since its formation. 
Source: The 20 photographs of the week | Art and design | The Guardian

Wilson’s ‘History of Tennis’.

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It perhaps says something of tennis’s slightly misshapen role in the national consciousness that a grown-up book documenting the sport’s entire history doesn’t seem quite so ridiculous.
It’s hard to imagine a publisher going for a social history of football such is the wealth of knowledge already out there.
But tennis, as Elizabeth Wilson explains in Love Game, has always been seen as a slightly effete cousin among British sports.
One which envelops the country for a fortnight, but barely makes a dent for 50 weeks of the year.
So it’s reasonable, you suppose, that you could capture much of the history of it in just over 300 pages.
Of course, you can’t. Not really. For those that know their McEnroes and Murrays but not their Lenglens and Lacostes, she weaves a well-drawn line straight through the game.
Which is handy, but frankly, there are whole books to be read or written on tennis’s Riviera era from the 1870s to the war; on the sport’s uneasy, but in many ways pioneering relationship with gay players; on Roger and Rafa; on Gottfried von Cramm and the Nazis.
Wilson addresses all here, of course, and, to be fair, often in depth.
She’s particularly good on the early days of the game, when vicars promoted the sport, through to its widespread adoption by the turn-of- the-century moneyed classes.
But the human stories – many forgotten to non-tennis buffs – are what give this history some bite.
Yes, we get chunks on Connors/McEnroe/Borg but most fascinating are the stories of gay players like serial US Open winner Bill Tilden, who was shunned by the tennis world because of his relations with young boys, and died penniless, and Von Cramm, who survived being gay under the Nazis on account of his fame.
via Love Game: A History of Tennis, From Victorian Pastime to Global Phenomenon by Elizabeth Wilson, book review  – The Independent.