Surfing under Northern Lights.

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Photo: Mick Fanning was “screaming with excitement” in between riding waves. (Supplied: Emil Sollie, Mats Grimsæth, RedBull)
by Anthony Pancia
In terms of ticking things off the bucket list, Mick Fanning may have trumped just about every surfer on the planet with a once-in-a-lifetime surf under a stunning Northern Lights display in Norway.
Fanning — currently on a hiatus from professional surfing — camped out on a beach in the Norwegian archipelago of Lofoten, Norway with local photographers Emil Sollie and Mats Grimsaeth waiting for the conditions to align and, as it turned out, they didn’t have to wait long.
“We’d set out a 10-day waiting period because there were so many elements that had to come together,” Fanning told the ABC.
“Even then it was a bit of a roll of the dice. You need the right waves, clear skies and on top of all that, you actually need the lights to come on.”
The lights came on for the first two nights, however, the waves refused to co-operate.
“But on the third night we got lucky,” Fanning said. The surfer spent the night riding “surprisingly good” waves as the photographers set to work capturing an image they planned for two years.
Read on via Surfer Mick Fanning rides waves under Norway’s Northern Lights – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Maasai Cricket Warriors.

maasai-cricket-warriors-129Dressed in flowing red skirts and draped in colorful bead necklaces but otherwise bare bodied, the warriors from the legendary Kenyan tribe of Maasai are one of the world’s most unusual and unlikely cricketing teams.
Dropping their spears in favor of cricket bats and leather balls, this group of youth is trying to promote healthy living within their community, and spreading awareness about HIV/AIDS and women’s issues by using sports as the medium.
maasai-cricket-warriors-7[2]They call themselves the Maasai Cricket Warriors.
Cricket came to this remote corner of Kenya six years ago entirely because of the efforts and passion of one South African woman, Aliya Bauer, who coaches the Maasai team.
Bauer was sent to Kenya’s Laikipia region to work on a research project about baboons.

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Stationed there in the bush, she missed cricket so much that she decided to introduce the game to the local community.
Read more via The Maasai Cricket Warriors | Amusing Planet.

Abbie the Surfing Dog.

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Photo: Abbie is the longest competing surf dog in the world. (Supplied: @abbiesurfs)
by Paige cockburn
The 10-year-old Australian Kelpie rescue dog has just taken first place in the World Dog Surfing Championships at Linda Mar Beach in California.
Abbie had a devastating start to life and was found on the roadside in the Silicon Valley, but was later adopted by Mike who introduced her to the beach in an attempt to rehabilitate her.
“We never planned this … originally we were just doing sports together as a way to bond because she had so much trauma,” Mike says.”She was even afraid of the dark and men, including me at first.
“But doing sports together I could actually measure how much closer we were getting … it built her trust in me.
“Since learning to ride the stick, Abbie has medalled in every competition she has entered and even set a new Guinness World Record for longest wave surfed by a dog — an impressive 107 metres.
But before this, it took some hard work from Mike to change people’s attitudes towards dog surfing and actually consider it a real sport rather than a novelty.

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Photo: (Supplied: @abbiesurfs)
“We tried to push it to be more of a sport … but we did get accused of being competitive,”
Mike says.“However, now everyone is competitive! “The same people who were pissed off at us are now fighting for trophies.
“The transformation has been massive and the world of dog surfing has officially moved from a dress-up event in the shallows, to a truly athletic competition.”
Now read on via A look inside the surprisingly competitive world of dog surfing – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Surfing Daredevils by Russell Ord.

16Daredevils in Western Australia have been braving waves as tall as 18 metres – more than five storeys – as a swell caused by a low-pressure system over the Indian Ocean swept the coast.
1575One surfer broke his leg in Margaret River as he came crashing down ‘probably the biggest wave ever ridden in Australia and got pummelled by 15 metres of whitewater.
We sent the celebrated surfing photographer Russell Ord into the mix to document the infamous break known as ‘The Right.’
15Photographs: Russell Ord for the Guardian.
See more Images via Monster swell: surfers in Australia tackle once-in-a-decade waves – in pictures | Sport | The Guardian.