Zodiacal Light shines from Three Stone Hill.

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Felsőtárkány, Hungary.
The Zodiacal light, left, with Venus and the Milky Way, right, appear near the top of the Three-Stone Hill on the Bükk Plateau.
The light is apparently caused by the reflection of sunshine from the interplanetary dust particles of the zodiacal cloud
Image Credit: Photograph by Peter Komka/EPA
See more Images via Best photos of the day: dog ‘paw-ternity’ leave and a giant Trump dummy | News | The Guardian

Full Moon in Timelapse rises over Los Angeles.

moonrises
Los Angeles based designer and photographer Dan Marker-Moore shot this absolutely stunning collage of eleven frames of a timelapse of the full moon ascending over Downtown Los Angeles.
He used an Olympus OMD-EM5 camera and a 100mm lens.
And the timelapse itself is worth every delicious second
from My Modern Met.
See the Video via Full Moon over Downtown LA — 5 things I learned today

Northern Lights at Dark Sky Preserve, Canada.

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Can you name Canada’s biggest national park?
Congratulations if you said Wood Buffalo National Park, located in north-eastern Alberta and southern Northwest Territories.
Established in 1922 to help protect northern Canada’s last remaining bison herds, today the 44,807-square-kilometre park – bigger than Switzerland – is regarded as an outstanding example of the country’s northern boreal plains.
The park is the world’s largest Dark Sky Preserve – which means this just might be the most star-filled sky you ever see in your life.
It is also a great place to view the cosmic fireworks known as the aurora borealis – the northern lights.
Read on via Everything’s Bigger in Canada – Traveller – Brand Discover

‘Within Reach of the Stars’ by Petr Horalek.

Honourable mention, Astronomy category
Within Reach by Petr Horalek.
The skies above ESO’s Paranal Observatory resemble oil on water as greens, yellows and blues blend to create an iridescent skyscape.
The rocky, barren landscape below evokes an alien world, complementing the cosmic display above
Image Credit: Photograph by Petr Horalek/PA.
via Royal Society Publishing Photography competition 2017 – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian

Aurora over Brooks Range, Alaska.

Image Credit: Photograph by © Fred Wasmer. All rights reserved.
A bright aurora appears over a homestead in the Brooks Range of northern Alaska on the morning of 23 March, 2015.
Fred Wasmer, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America
Member since 2014
Source: Aurora Over Homestead | Smithsonian Photo Contest | Smithsonian

Jupiter’s Europa moon prime candidate for Alien life.

An artist’s rendition of a water vapour plume erupting from Europa. Photograph: Nasa/Esa/K. Retherford/SWRI
A Nasa probe that explored Jupiter’s moon Europa flew through a giant plume of water vapour that erupted from the icy surface and reached a hundred miles high, according to a fresh analysis of the spacecraft’s data.
The discovery has cemented the view among some scientists that the Jovian moon, one of four first spotted by the Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei in 1610, is the most promising place in the solar system to hunt for alien life.
If such geysers are common on Europa, Nasa and European Space Agency (ESA) missions that are already in the pipeline could fly through and look for signs of life in the brine, which comes from a vast subsurface ocean containing twice as much water as all the oceans on Earth.
Nasa’s Galileo spacecraft spent eight years in orbit around Jupiter and made its closest pass over Europa, a moon about the size of our own, in 1997. As the probe dropped beneath an altitude of 250 miles, its sensors twitched with unexpected signals that scientists were unable to explain at the time.
Now, in a new study, the researchers describe how they went back to the Galileo data after grainy images beamed home from the Hubble space telescope in 2016 showed what appeared to be plumes of water blasting from Europa’s surface.
They found that a sudden blast of water from the Jovian moon explained the Galileo probe’s strange measurements.
Source: Moon of Jupiter prime candidate for alien life after water blast found | Science | The Guardian