Victoria’s London Arch on a clear warm Night.

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The London Arch, Victoria on a clear night.
Photographer: Oat Vaiyaboon
by Oat Vaiyaboon · · From Pic of the Week
We didn’t plan on such a long drive but the night was calm, clear and not too cold.
So we decided that astrophotography at the Apostles on the Great Ocean Road, Victoria was on the cards.
After looking at a few stats and an app., the milky way seem to be in a optimal position for a star trail.
Port Campbell VIC 3269
Source: ABC OPEN: London Arch on a warm spring night || From Project: Pic of the Week

The Futuro Spaceship House lands in Britain.

The Futuro house by Matti Suuronen … restored by Craig Barnes, on show in Le Havre. Photograph: James Hemery
Like jetpacks, flying cars and robot butlers, the Futuro was supposed to revolutionise the way we lived.
Unlike those other staples of an imagined future, however, this architectural oddity actually existed.
A colourful pod in the shape of an ellipse, the Futuro was a sci-fi vision of the future, offering us a living space light years away from what most of us were used to.
Nicknamed the Flying Saucer and the UFO House, it was symbolic of the ambitious space-race era.
But as the Futuro celebrates its 50th anniversary, the revolution it promised clearly never happened.
One belongs to Craig Barnes, an artist based in London, who saw a Futuro in a “dishevelled and tired” state while on holiday in Port Alfred, South Africa.
He decided to mount a rescue mission. “I have family out there,” he says, “and I’d been seeing this Futuro since I was about three.
I viewed it as a spaceship. I drove past in 2013 and workers were knocking down a garage next to it. I panicked and managed to trace the owner.”
Read on via Source: Back to the Futuro: the spaceship house that landed in Yorkshire | Art and design | The Guardian

Sputnik 1, launched on 4 October. 1957.

Sputnik 1 was the first artificial Earth satellite.
The Soviet Union launched it into an elliptical low Earth orbit on 4 October 1957, orbiting for three weeks before its batteries died, then silently for two more months before falling back into the atmosphere.
It was a 58 cm (23 in) diameter polished metal sphere, with four external radio antennas to broadcast radio pulses.
Its radio signal was easily detectable even by radio amateurs, and the 65° inclination and duration of its orbit made its flight path cover virtually the entire inhabited Earth.
The satellite’s unanticipated success precipitated the American Sputnik crisis and triggered the Space Race, a part of the Cold War.
The launch was the beginning of a new era of political, military, technological, and scientific developments. Tracking and studying Sputnik 1 from Earth provided scientists with valuable information.
The density of the upper atmosphere could be deduced from its drag on the orbit, and the propagation of its radio signals gave data about the ionosphere.
Sputnik 1 was launched during the International Geophysical Year from Site No.1/5, at the 5th Tyuratam range, in Kazakh SSR (now known as the Baikonur Cosmodrome).
The satellite travelled at about 29,000 kilometres per hour (18,000 mph; 8,100 m/s), taking 96.2 minutes to complete each orbit.
It transmitted on 20.005 and 40.002 MHz, which were monitored by radio operators throughout the world. The signals continued for 21 days until the transmitter batteries ran out on 26 October 1957. Sputnik burned up on 4 January 1958 while reentering Earth’s atmosphere, after three months, 1440 completed orbits of the Earth, and a distance travelled of about 70 million km.
Source: Sputnik 1 – Wikipedia

Zodiacal Light shines from Three Stone Hill.

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Felsőtárkány, Hungary.
The Zodiacal light, left, with Venus and the Milky Way, right, appear near the top of the Three-Stone Hill on the Bükk Plateau.
The light is apparently caused by the reflection of sunshine from the interplanetary dust particles of the zodiacal cloud
Image Credit: Photograph by Peter Komka/EPA
See more Images via Best photos of the day: dog ‘paw-ternity’ leave and a giant Trump dummy | News | The Guardian

A View of Earth and the Moon from Mars.

Photographic Image by NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona
During a recent calibration exercise, NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter captured a remarkable view of Earth and its moon from a distance of 127 million miles (205 million kilometers).
It’s so clear, you can even make out our planet’s continents.
To calibrate the HiRISE camera aboard the Mars Orbiter, NASA scientists needed to scan an object other than the Red Planet.
Seeing as Earth is right next door, that was an obvious choice.
The image is a combination of two separate exposures taken on November 20, 2016, and have been moderately adjusted to make both objects appear equally as bright (otherwise the Earth would have appeared too dark).
The combined view shows the correct positions and sizes of the two celestial bodies relative to each other.
Source: Incredible New Image Shows the Earth and Moon From Mars

Full Moon in Timelapse rises over LA.

moonrises
Los Angeles based designer and photographer Dan Marker-Moore shot this absolutely stunning collage of eleven frames of a timelapse of the full moon ascending over Downtown Los Angeles.
He used an Olympus OMD-EM5 camera and a 100mm lens.
And the timelapse itself is worth every delicious second
from My Modern Met.
See the Video via Full Moon over Downtown LA — 5 things I learned today

‘Within Reach of the Stars.’

Honourable mention, Astronomy category
Within Reach by Petr Horalek.
The skies above ESO’s Paranal Observatory resemble oil on water as greens, yellows and blues blend to create an iridescent skyscape.
The rocky, barren landscape below evokes an alien world, complementing the cosmic display above
Image Credit: Photograph by Petr Horalek/PA.
via Royal Society Publishing Photography competition 2017 – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian

Aurora over Brooks Range, Alaska.

Image Credit: Photograph by © Fred Wasmer. All rights reserved.
A bright aurora appears over a homestead in the Brooks Range of northern Alaska on the morning of 23 March, 2015.
Fred Wasmer, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America
Member since 2014
Source: Aurora Over Homestead | Smithsonian Photo Contest | Smithsonian

The Moon and Venus over The Grampians.

Pic of the week: Moon over Grampians.
The moon setting with Venus from Reid’s Lookout, in Victoria’s Grampians National Park.
Image Credit: Photograph by ABC Open contributor Greg Gorter
Source: Pic of the week moon over Grampians – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Recreating Mars in the Gobi Desert.

Jinchang, China
A staff member wearing a mock space suit poses in the Gobi desert near the C-space project Mars simulation base outside Jinchang.
Image Credit: Photograph by Thomas Peter/Reuters
Source: The 20 photographs of the week | Art and design | The Guardian