‘Pole Sitting’ in Adelaide, circa 1950s.

poles2

When I was 12 years old my Dad would regularly take me down to the Henley Beach Square at Henley Beach (a seaside suburb of Adelaide).
There I would stand open mouthed, staring upwards at the grown up adults sitting on top of poles.
They were crazy, but why did they do it?
Evidently, pole sitting competitions were all the rage in the United States in the early 1920s.
People were desperate for money and so they sat up on the top of poles to win some lousy competition.
Like most things the craze took another 20 years or more to reach the shores of Australia.
The Square would be packed with families enjoying the summer nights as they wandered from pole to pole.
There was a lot of good natured banter between pole sitters and those gawking up at them.
Because Adelaide was a small city there were a lot of people who knew each other and to me a visit to the square was exciting.
derwombat

Vale Ark Tribe.

Ark Tribe was the first CFMEU construction worker to be charged with not attending a hearing under the then John Howard’s ABCC laws.
This all came about in 2008 when Ark participated in a workplace meeting over safety issues on a site in Adelaide that was so bad Safework shut it down.
Ark was charged, dragged through the courts and threatened with jail.
He was later acquitted and awarded costs.
Ark will be well remembered as a defender of workers rights in the Australian Building and Construction industry.
On the 18th May 2018 sadly Ark passed away after a long illness.
Memorial details for Ark Tribe
Date: Friday 25th May

Service will be held at:
The West Adelaide Football Club “STURT PEA ROOM”
57 Milner Road RICHMOND SA.
Commencing at 4pm sharp.
John Camillo, AMWU State Secretary

Moon Set-remote Marree.

90651Moon Set
Image Credit: Photograph by Steve Batten · · From Snapped: Your Top 3 in 2014
Marree which is in the Remote area of Australia doesn’t appear to hold much interest, but it’s there, you just have to find it.
Marree South Australia 5733
via ABC OPEN: Moon Set || From Project: Snapped: Your Top 3 in 2014.

Hidden Emotions of the Modern Man.

2014-SA-awards-Portr-WallerKaren-107449(pp_w900_h595)Photo: Darren Smith is photographed for Karen Waller’s Vulnerable exhibition to break down the myth that real men do not show emotion.
(Supplied: Karen Waller)
by Brett Williamson
In her latest exhibition, Vulnerable, Adelaide photographer Karen Waller has captured the often unseen emotional side of modern men.
Her photographs capture South Australian men dealing with the memories of grief, depression, anxiety, loneliness, isolation, fear, illness or old age.
“It is really important that we have these images of men, and images of men in particular who are seen to be crying, images of men who appear to be tough but also have the great strength of character to show us that they are also men who are not afraid to show us their emotion,” Ms Waller said.
Ms Waller met her first subject, Darren Smith, through a group of friends.
“I was told that he could be quite emotional and had some stories to tell around grief,” Ms Waller said.
Mr Smith sat in Ms Waller’s studio and they shared unguarded stories of their emotional past.
Wearing a dark singlet, gold chain, multiple earrings and covered in tattoos, Mr Smith was an imposing figure as he sat in the studio.
As he recalled his stories, he began to well up and shed a tear.
Ms Waller caught the image of him amidst the grip of his emotions.
“It’s a beautiful image of a man who looks really tough and who is also a man who is vulnerable,” Ms Waller said.
She was amazed by his courage to display the emotion openly and then allow her to share the image publicly.
By capturing men openly displaying their emotions, Ms Waller hopes to break down the stereotype of the stoic Australian male and openly show that real men do cry.
via Adelaide photographer captures the often hidden emotions of the modern man – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation).

The Umpherston Sinkhole Garden.

The region in the southeast of South Australia, near Mount Gambier, is littered with many volcanic and karst features such as volcanic craters, lakes, limestone caves, water-filled caves and sinkholes.
One particular sinkhole, located just off Jubilee Highway East, is particularly worth visiting. What was once a typical limestone cave formed by the corrosion of limestone rocks by seawater, and the subsequent collapse of the chamber’s roof, has been transformed into a beautiful garden.
The Sunken Garden in the Umpherston Sinkhole was built by James Umpherston in the 1880s, after he purchased the property about twenty years prior. Being retired, Umpherson wanted to create a place where the people of Mount Gambier could come to relax and escape the heat of summer.
He carved a path in the side of the rock and erected a set of wooden steps so people could descend into the sinkhole and to his sunken garden, where he planted all sorts of ferns, shrubs and flowers.
The sinkhole even had a small lake within where visitors could take boat rides.The garden became an immediate success and very popular among the residents of Mount Gambier.
After James Umpherston died in 1900, his garden fell into disrepair, and it was only about forty years ago that the garden was rescued from a rubbish dump that it had become. The garden was restored by the employees of the South Australian Woods and Forests Department in 1976.
Source: A Garden In A Sinkhole | Amusing Planet