A Scottish Christmas Yarn for the Tightarses.

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The Yarn Begins:
An old man in Scotland calls his son in London the day before Christmas Eve and says, “I hate to ruin your day son but I have to tell you that your mother and I are divorcing; forty-five years of misery is enough.”
“Dad, what are you talking about?” the son screams.
“We can’t stand the sight of each other any longer” the father says. “We’re sick of each other and I’m sick of talking about this, so you call your sister in Leeds and tell her.”
Frantically, the son calls his sister, who explodes on the phone. “Like hell they’re getting divorced!” she shouts, “I’ll take care of this!”
She calls Scotland immediately, and screams at her father “You are NOT getting divorced. Don’t do a single thing until I get there. I’m calling my brother back, and we will both be up there tomorrow.
“Until then, don’t do a thing, DO YOU HEAR ME?” and hangs up.

The old man hangs up his phone and turns to his wife. “That’s Sorted! They’re coming up for Christmas tomorrow and they’re paying their own way.”

Rob Powell

The Deep-Fried Mars Bar, Aberdeenshire.

Chip-shop-asked-to-remove-009The much-maligned deep-fried Mars bar is coming under attack again. Photograph: PA Photograph: Danny Lawson/PA
by Chitra Ramaswamy
Birthplace of the World Famous Deep Fried Mars Bar,” the banner announces. It’s vast, proud, and under threat.
Welcome to The Carron Fish Bar in Stonehaven, Aberdeenshire, where 20 years ago – so the legend has it – two pupils from the local academy challenged each other to eat a load of random battered stuff, resulting in the Scottish delicacy (or culinary embarrassment, depending on who you talk to) known as the deep-fried Mars bar.
Aberdeenshire council refuses to share The Carron’s pride and has demanded the banner’s removal. Lorraine Watson, the Carron’s owner, remains unapologetic and tells me the deep-fried Mars bar tastes “like a warm millionaire’s shortbread” and is going nowhere.
The Carron currently sells 150-200 bars a week. “The council are now saying it’s the banner that’s the problem, not the fact that it’s about deep-fried Mars bars,” she says. “Well I’m sorry, but there are thousands who come here from all over the world to buy one. It’s an icon for Stonehaven.”
Does she think the deep-fried Mars bar, which boasts its own Wikipedia page and has been featured on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, has been unfairly blamed for Scotland’s record on obesity and ill-health?
“Yes,” she says. “It’s really for tourists.
And everything is bad for you if you do it enough. People come here to go to Dunnotter Castle and then have a deep-fried Mars bar as a wee treat. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with that.”
Read on via ‘I’ve got judges who love them’: in defence of the deep-fried Mars bar | Chitra Ramaswamy | Life and style | The Guardian.

The Mirror Man Statue at Loch Earn.

Tourists view the mirror man statue by artist Rob Mulholland at Loch Earn in St Fillans, Scotland.
The three-meter-tall sculpture made from mirrored tiles spends winters out of the water due to the inclement weather, returning again in the summer months.
Image Credit: Photograph by Jeff  J Mitchell / Getty.
Source: Photos of the Week: 7/15–7/21 – The Atlantic

Lighting the Old Man of Storr, Isle of Skye.

Lighting the Old Man
On a stormy autumn day a fleeting shaft of light illuminates the Old Man of Storr and other pinnacles of the Trotternish Ridge on the Isle of Skye, Scotland.
This photo is a finalist in the Travel category of our 14th Annual Photo Contest.
Image Credit: Photograph by Garry Ridsdale, Cheshire, United Kingdom
Member since 2014
Source: Lighting the Old Man | Smithsonian Photo Contest | Smithsonian