Remote Scotland.

we-capture-the-beauty-of-remote-scottish-landscapes-3__880We are Danka and Peter, amateur photographers and passionate travellers from Slovakia.
We spent the past year in Scotland where we had many opportunities to travel across the country and take photos.
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Mostly we use film cameras, because we consider analog photography more unique and authentic compared to digital photography.
Our photos have been taken at many different places, but most of them have been captured in the Highlands region.
We like this part of Scotland the most, particularly the Glencoe area.
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We were also totally amazed by the Isle of Mull and Isle of Skye.
The whole west coast is absolutely astonishing and has a lot to offer.
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More info: frombusytoeasy.blogspot.sk
See the full article via We Capture The Beauty Of Remote Scottish Landscapes | Bored Panda

The Remote and Misty Island of Skye.

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Photographic Image: Moyan Brenn; Skye.
Shrouded in mist. Drenched with rain. Remote. Forbidding. Intoxicating. Even beautiful.
There are limitless ways to describe the myriad islands off the coast of Scotland, all more superlative than the last.
With 97 inhabited islands, no other country in the United Kingdom has so many offshore territories.
From Skye, to Islay, to the Orkney Islands and the Outer Hebrides, island life is an essential part of the modern Scottish identity.
With so many to choose from, compiling a definitive list of Scotland’s greatest islands would be nigh on impossible.
So we’re not even going to try. Instead, here is a celebration of 10 of these spectacular islands, from the famous, to the famously obscure.
See more of the Scottish Isles via 10 Spectacular, Remote Islands off the Coast of Scotland – Urban Ghosts

Magical Quiraing in the Highlands of Scotland.

This is the kind of place that leaves you breathless, and not just because you have to trek uphill. The craggy landscape looks like something from a magical realm. Its ridges roll toward the sky like great green waves and little lakes nestled at their feet darken and seem to dance beneath the passing clouds.
Though it looks like a serene scene straight from a dream, the Quiraing was formed by terrestrial turmoil. It’s one of Britain’s largest landslips, and was created due to strain within its underlying layers of rock.
It’s part of the Trotternish landslip, which also created the equally beautiful Old Man of Storr.

But unlike at the Storr, the earth at the Quiraing isn’t done wriggling around just yet—the road at its base has to be repaired yearly because the land still shifts a few centimeters each year.
But as inconvenient (and costly) as the constant road repairs may be, there’s no denying the constant movement has created an utterly amazing landscape. Jagged cliffs, towering rock pinnacles, and various dips and valleys create a rich tapestry of textures, forming a vivid feast for the eyes.Trails wind through the geological wonder, letting you wander among its many rock formations.

The views are spectacular from any angle. As such, it’s no wonder people have been drawn to the land for thousands of years. Its name comes from a Norse saying for “Round Fold;” a nod to the Isle of Skye’s Viking history. It’s been said the islanders used to hide their cattle from Viking raiders within the Quiraing’s many nooks and crannies.
Source: The Quiraing – Highland, Scotland – Atlas Obscura

The Isle of Eilean Donan.

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Having been featured in photos, ads, and films, the island fortesss known as Eilean Donan has spent centuries solidifying its position as the most iconic image of Scotland for natives and foreigners alike.
Built on an island a mile away from the Village of Dornie, the land was first occupied in 634 AD, home to the monastic cell of Bishop Donan.
During the 13th century Alexander II built the first incarnation of Eilean Donan to defend the surrounding mountains of Kintail and the Isle of Skye against the Viking hordes.
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This original castle is said to have an immense curtained wall connecting seven towers and spanning the entire island.
Come 1719, a lesser-known Jacobite uprising partially destroyed the structure, and for the following 200 years it lay in near ruins. Finally in 1911, Colonel John MacRae-Gilstrap arrived.
He bought the island and restored the castle, reopening it in 1932.
via Eilean Donan | Atlas Obscura.

Burns Night and the Haggis, Scotland.

The first supper was held in memoriam at Burns Cottage by Burns’s friends, on 21 July 1801, the fifth anniversary of his death; it has been a regular occurrence ever since.
The first still extant Burns Club was founded in Greenock in 1801 by merchants who were born in Ayrshire, some of whom had known Burns.
They were held to celebrate the life and work of Legendary Scottish poet Robbie Burns
They held the first Burns supper on what they thought was his birthday, 29 January 1802, but in 1803, they discovered the Ayr parish records that noted his date of birth was actually 25 January 1759. Since then, suppers have been held on or about 25 January.

Photograph: Sheep’s stomach stuffed with offal, suet, oatmeal and spices is better known as haggis and eaten on Burns Night in Scotland.
Burns suppers may be formal or informal. Both typically include haggis (a traditional Scottish dish celebrated by Burns in Address to a Haggis), Scotch whisky and the recitation of Burns’s poetry.
Formal dinners are hosted by organisations such as Burns clubs, the Freemasons or St Andrews Societies; they occasionally end with dancing when ladies are present. Formal suppers follow a standard order.
Source: The most disgusting food in the world – in pictures | Food | The Guardian

‘Bloom’ colourful Light display, Edinburgh.

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‘Bloom’, the opening event for the Edinburgh International Festival, lights up Saint Andrew Square with a colourful array of projections.
More photos of the light show in our gallery
Image Credit: Photograph by Murdo Macleod for the Guardian
Source: God’s own field and a gigantic bubble: today’s most stunning photos | World news | The Guardian