The Newnes Glow Worm Railway Tunnel.

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Sometimes, abandoned man-made structures turn into dangerous eyesores, rotting away slowly before returning to nature or being torn down.
But other times, like when abandoned ships are re-purposed as living reefs, or mines colonized by bats, abandoned structures take on a new semi-natural life all their own, like a crab who uses a jar for a shell.
Such is the case with the Newnes railroad tunnel.
The Newnes railroad was closed in 1932 after 25 years of shipping oil shale.
The rails were pulled out of the 600-meter tunnel, which had been bored through the sandstone in the Wollemi National Park, and the tunnel was left to its own devices.
For Newnes, that meant becoming home to thousands and thousands of glow worms.
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The glow worm is a catch-all name for the bioluminescent larvae of various species, in this case the Arachnocampa richardsae, a type of fungus gnat.
Found in massive numbers in caves, the fungus gnat larvae cling to the rocky walls of the abandoned tunnel and hunt with long, glowing strings of sticky mucus.
To see the glowing gnats, enter the tunnel during daylight hours, and head to the middle – it gets dark in the middle where there is a bend in the tunnel – with a flashlight, so as not to bump into the walls.
Turn off the light and wait a minute or two. One by one, the gnats will begin to shine like stars emerging in the night.
via Newnes Glow Worm Tunnel | Atlas Obscura.

Old Steam, Maldon, Victoria.

117092Photgrapher: Shayne T Wright.
Article by Shayne T. Wright.
Whilst taking my son to soccer at Castlemaine, we decided to avoid the well-worn Calder highway and return via the historic town of Maldon. With camera in hand, we decided to take 10 minutes to look at some historic sites around the town.
Whilst visiting a the ‘Beehive Chimney’, located in the old goldfields, we heard the steam whistle calling.
Dashing to the car, we found J549 switching ends in preparation for a tourist run along the Victorian Goldfields Railway (VGR).
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Source: ABC OPEN: Old steam || From Project: Pic of the Week

Rail Journeys: London to Fort William.

Some of the world’s wildest and most beautiful scenery is best enjoyed from a train window. From Lhasa to Lima, we choose brilliant and great value routes

Highland flung… the Glenfinnan Viaduct, on the way to Fort William. Photograph: Alan Copson/Getty Images
London to Fort William, UK.  Duration: 13 hours.
The Caledonian Sleeper, one of Britain’s last sleeper services (the other is the Night Riviera to Penzance), is getting a £100m upgrade.
The new trains will have double beds, en suites, Highland food and Arran toiletries.
They’ll run first on the Lowland route from London to Edinburgh/Glasgow in October, then join the Highland route to Fort William next year.
The Highland service, called the Deerstalker, is one of the best train journeys in Britain.
After Glasgow, it goes past Loch Treig to the foot of Ben Nevis. From Fort William, the line continues to Mallaig, across the Glenfinnan viaduct – of Harry Potter fame – for ferries to Skye.
via 18 of the world’s best rail journeys | Travel | The Guardian

Train running through Frozen Woods.

It’s a rare occurrence when the forest is wearing such enchanting colors, so I jumped at the opportunity and get there to eternalize that.
The forest retained its beauty all day, because of the cold, -5 degrees Celsius.
Only the narrow gauge broke the silence sometimes.

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See more great images via I Spent A Whole Day In The Frozen Woods To Capture This Magnificent Winter View Of The Nearby Hills | Bored Panda

Reflections in a Train Carriage.

Image Credit: Photograph by Eric Etchart, the Winner.
Click on to Eric’s Website here
https://www.ultimatephotographer.co.uk/
This man was sitting near me on the Eurostar to Paris and spent the whole journey looking out of the window.
It was a sunny day and I managed to capture some great reflections.
PAUL GOLDSTEIN, JUDGE commented: This could have been taken at any time in the last 50 years – there is something almost timeless about this intricate study.
The train carriage is a little sleazy and the window full of condensation adding to the griminess of the reflection. but this is not the photographer’s fault. Winner by a nose.
Source: Readers’ travel photography competition: September – the winners | Travel | The Guardian

Maeklong Railway Market.

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Maeklong Railway Market, located in Samut Songkhram, Thailand, around 37 miles west of Bangkok, looks like any other open-air market in Asia.
There are tropical fruits and vegetables such as lychee, durian, and mango in big brightly colored piles, variety of dried spices, pastes and herbs, freshly caught seafood and other local foods.
The crowd weave their way around in between vendors, picking up whatever they need for the day. The market is sheltered by low-hanging awnings/umbrellas and if you look closely, you will notice that you are actually walking on train rails.
Then a piercing siren sounds and in a flash the market transforms – the shoppers disappear and the stallholders whip away their produce.
One moment you see the locals shopping for their vegetables and the next moment the vendors will scoop up their baskets and boxes and anything that lies over the track.
The market comes to a standstill as all the vendors hold on to the poles supporting their awnings to make way for the train to pass.
It is such a tight squeeze that the train travelling at about 15mph almost touches the fruits, vegetables and everything else at the marketplace as it passes through.
Photo Credit: Josh
http://bit.ly/1mwPlZx
Read more via Maeklong Railway Market: Marketplace With a Railway Track Through it | Amusing Planet.