Eerie and Fiery Eyed Trains at Rest.

Michael Knudsen, a photographer from Denmark, has captured what looks like the beginning of the robot rebellion.
The stunning image shows three trains stationed side by side, their carriages appearing like the bodies of mechanical snakes.
What’s more eerie, though, are their headlights glowing like red fiery eyes staring right at us!
The photo, went viral on the Bored Panda Facebook page.
Knudsen has an entire photography series on the trains and their depot, some of which you can see below.

these-trains-in-denmark-look-like-theyre-about-to-take-over-the-world3-805x427

 

these-trains-in-denmark-look-like-theyre-about-to-take-over-the-world2-1-805x427

Via Bored Panda
Source: These trains in Denmark look like they’re about to take over the world

The Steamrail Rolls into Bendigo.

111215
The steamrail rolls in.  by Meg West · · From Snapped: My town
On occasion, the old steamrail rolls through Bendigo on its way through to Echuca.
This can be during the day or in the middle of the night.
We went out for a 1am viewing at the Bendigo Train Station.
Image CreditMeg West, Contributor, Kangaroo Flat VIC 3555.
via ABC OPEN: The steamrail rolls in || From Project: Snapped: My town.

Locomotives by Roy Stryker, 1942.

One of the great innovations in a sea of great things accomplished during the Franklin Roosevelt administrations was the formation of the Farm Security Administration, a division of the government established to help farmers through the devastating Dust Bowl and Great Depression.
A subset of the FSA was a photographic unit which was set up to document the progress made by the FSA (and provide, I am sure, for some much-needed good news, a hearts-and-minds campaign).
6a00d83542d51e69e201bb07b0980e970d-500wi
This division was headed by Roy Emerson Stryker, who wound up with the greatest and most beautiful photographic history ever assembled in the United States.
There were about 77,000 images made, and I recall reading (somewhere) that the total budget for the Stryker group for the years 1936-1942 was about $100,000, meaning that each completed image cost just over a dollar apiece.

So far as art funding by the government is concerned, that about the best it has done.
See more at this great website via JF Ptak Science Books: PowerPunk Locomotives, in Color (1942).

The Niagara Gorge Railroad, 1893.

Photo Credit; Library of Congress.
The Niagara Gorge Railroad by Kaushik
Before the Niagara river plunges along the Canada–United States border to create the mesmerizing Niagara Falls, it cuts a 11 km long gorge through the hard dolomite rocks of the Niagara Escarpment.
This gorge has been a popular scene for sightseers ever since Niagara welcomed its first tourists more than a hundred years ago.
Back then, the gorge was home to another attraction—a narrow-gauge railroad running along the shoreline at the bottom of the gorge.The Niagara Gorge Railroad was the dream of Civil War veteran Captain John M. Brinker, who was one of Buffalo’s foremost citizens.
It was Captain Brinker’s idea to build an electric rail road through the Niagara Gorge. His proposal was at first met with incredulity, but his earnestness compelled attention. It was, however, not an original idea.
Prior to Captain Brinker, the Niagara Falls and Whirlpool Company made a half hearted attempt to construct a railroad within the Niagara gorge, but legal obstacles prevented the company from executing the plan.
Source: The Niagara Gorge Railroad | Amusing Planet

Riding the Rails during the Great Depression.

Since Civil War times, Americans had been hopping trains to get around.
It’s not the safest way to travel, but for people who were down on there luck it was sometimes the only way to get around.
When massive railroad strikes broke out around the turn of the century, railroad companies began to hire railroad police to keep watch.
These watchmen became known as “bulls” and some had a reputation for being violent with anyone caught in the train yard without good purpose.
But, during the Great Depression, in the 1930s, many poor folks had no other way of getting across long distances.
Even hitchhiking wasn’t a sure bet since many folks either didn’t have a car or didn’t have money for gasoline.
Tramps and dedicated workers alike both rode the rails during the Great Depression trying to just make ends meet.

For some it was actually a romantic way to travel.
Source: Train Hopping During the Great Depression – The Good Old Days