Reflections in a Train Carriage.

Image Credit: Photograph by Eric Etchart, the Winner.
This man was sitting near me on the Eurostar to Paris and spent the whole journey looking out of the window.
It was a sunny day and I managed to capture some great reflections.
PAUL GOLDSTEIN, JUDGE commented: This could have been taken at any time in the last 50 years – there is something almost timeless about this intricate study.
The train carriage is a little sleazy and the window full of condensation adding to the griminess of the reflection. but this is not the photographer’s fault. Winner by a nose.
Source: Readers’ travel photography competition: September – the winners | Travel | The Guardian

Abandoned Mail Rail Tunnel.

mail-rail-london-post-office-railwayAll images by cakehole
Abandoned subway stations, such as the ‘ghost stations’ of the Paris Metro, have long been sought out by urban explorers.
The narrow-gauge Post Office Railway (aka Mail Rail), inspired by a similar freight network built by the Chicago Tunnel Company, opened in 1927 and operated between the Paddington Sorting Office and Whitechapel Eastern Delivery Office.
mail-rail-london-post-office-railway-6The railway, which served eight stations along 6.5 miles (10.5 km) of track, was closed for financial reasons in 2003 after 75 years of operation.
But as the images show, the deserted network remains in good condition today.
Source: Urban Ghosts Exploring the Deserted Tunnels of London’s Post Office Railway | Urban Ghosts

Rusting away in The Lebanon.

An old locomotive rusts inside the abandoned Riyaq train station in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley on May 1, 2019.
Rail transport in Lebanon began in the 1890s as French projects under the Ottoman empire, but largely ceased in the 1970s owing to the country’s civil war.
The last remaining routes ended for economic reasons in the 1990s. At its peak, Lebanon had about 408 kilometers of railway.
Image Credit: Photograph by Joseph Eid / AFP / Getty
Source: Photos of the Week: German Asparagus, Traffic Zebras, Enormous Bear – The Atlantic

‘Bob the Railway Dog’ 1882-1895.

Bob the Railway Dog had an insatiable thirst for train travel – he was a dog for all Australians.
THIS SCRUFFY GERMAN COLLIE was born in 1882 with four seriously itchy paws.
At just nine months old, Bob left his home at the Macclesfield Hotel, South Australia, and began his canine career as a hitchhiker on railway locomotives – often taking himself on interstate trips and being welcomed everywhere by friendly train crews.
Peterborough History Group chair Heather Parker says Bob the Railway Dog, as he was later known, was adored throughout his home state and beyond. “He had a wonderful temperament and loved people, particularly the engine drivers,” she says.
“He’d start off going in one direction, he’d get off and think about it for a while – he could pick and choose where he wanted to go – and hop on another train. He liked Broken Hill and he had a friend down in Hindley Street, Adelaide, who used to give him food.”
Adelaide’s “The Advertiser” said in 1939 that, until his death at the distinguished age of 13, Bob traveled freely – “like politicians” – on the trains, suburban trams and even the Murray steamers.
He also attended official functions, The Advertiser reported.

Bob, the railway dog, (sitting on top of the driver’s car) of a stationary locomotive at Port Augusta Railway yard, circa 1887.
Railway staff stand in a group alongside the vehicle. (Photo courtesy of the State Library of South Australia.)
“He was a guest at the banquet for the opening of the railway from Peterborough to Broken Hill and appeared at the opening of the Hawkesbury Bridge in New South Wales.
Bob was happiest on a Yankee engine, said The Petersburg Times: “The big whistle and belching smokestack seem to have an irresistible attraction for him; He lives on the fat of the land, and he is not particular from whom he accepts his dinner.”
News of the traveling dog soon spread, even as far away as England.
In 1895, shortly before Bob died, an E. Cresswell, of Adelaide, wrote to an English magazine, The Spectator, to share Bob’s story.
“His name is Railway Bob and he passes his whole existence on the train – his favourite seat being on top of the coal box,” the author wrote. “He has travelled many thousands of miles, going all over the lines in South Australia.”

A Statue of Bob the Railway Dog in the Main Street of Peterborough, South Australia. (Photo credit: Sulzer55/wikimedia.org)
“The most curious part of his conduct is that he has no master, but every engine driver is his friend.
At night he follows home his engine man of the day never leaving him or letting him out of his sight until they are back on the Railway Station in the morning, where he starts off on another of his ceaseless journeys”.
Continue reading via Bob the railway dog: icon of Australian history – Australian Geographic

The Steamrail Rolls into Bendigo.

111215
The steamrail rolls in.  by Meg West · · From Snapped: My town
On occasion, the old steamrail rolls through Bendigo on its way through to Echuca.
This can be during the day or in the middle of the night.
We went out for a 1am viewing at the Bendigo Train Station.
Image CreditMeg West, Contributor, Kangaroo Flat VIC 3555.
via ABC OPEN: The steamrail rolls in || From Project: Snapped: My town.