Abandoned Mail Rail Tunnel, London.

mail-rail-london-post-office-railwayAll images by cakehole
Abandoned subway stations, such as the ‘ghost stations’ of the Paris Metro, have long been sought out by urban explorers.
The narrow-gauge Post Office Railway (aka Mail Rail), inspired by a similar freight network built by the Chicago Tunnel Company, opened in 1927 and operated between the Paddington Sorting Office and Whitechapel Eastern Delivery Office.
mail-rail-london-post-office-railway-6The railway, which served eight stations along 6.5 miles (10.5 km) of track, was closed for financial reasons in 2003 after 75 years of operation.
But as the images show, the deserted network remains in good condition today.
Source: Urban Ghosts Exploring the Deserted Tunnels of London’s Post Office Railway | Urban Ghosts

Reflections in a Train Carriage by E. Etchart.

Image Credit: Photograph by Eric Etchart, the Winner.
This man was sitting near me on the Eurostar to Paris and spent the whole journey looking out of the window.
It was a sunny day and I managed to capture some great reflections.
PAUL GOLDSTEIN, JUDGE commented: This could have been taken at any time in the last 50 years – there is something almost timeless about this intricate study.
The train carriage is a little sleazy and the window full of condensation adding to the griminess of the reflection. but this is not the photographer’s fault. Winner by a nose.
Source: Readers’ travel photography competition: September – the winners | Travel | The Guardian

Eerie Fiery Eyed Trains sneeking around in Denmark.

Michael Knudsen, a photographer from Denmark, has captured what looks like the beginning of the robot rebellion.
The stunning image shows three trains stationed side by side, their carriages appearing like the bodies of mechanical snakes.
What’s more eerie, though, are their headlights glowing like red fiery eyes staring right at us!
The photo, went viral on the Bored Panda Facebook page.
Knudsen has an entire photography series on the trains and their depot, some of which you can see below.

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Via Bored Panda
Source: These trains in Denmark look like they’re about to take over the world

Great Train Graveyard, Uyuni, Bolivia.

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by Nicholas Jackson (Admin)
It’s a cemetery for trains, for locomotives. And it’s so big that it looks as though all of the trains in South America were moved to Uyuni, Bolivia, to chug their last chug.
Filled with hollowed out bodies that have completely rusted over and other remains, the “Great Train Graveyard” can be found on the otherwise deserted outskirts of Uyuni, a small trading region high in the Andean plain.
Uyuni has long been known as an important transportation hub in South America and it connects several major cities.
In the early 19th century, big plans were made to build an even bigger network of trains out of Uyuni, but the project was abandoned because of a combination of technical difficulties and tension with neighboring countries.
The trains and other equipment were left to rust and fade out of memory.
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Most of the trains that can be found in the Graveyard date back to the early 20th century and were imported from Britain.
In other places in the world, the mighty steel trains would have held up better.
The salt winds that blow over Uyuni, which hosts the world’s largest salt plain, have corroded all of the metal.
Without guards or even a fence, these pieces were picked over and vandalized long ago.
Edited by: SkareMedia (Author), Dylan (Admin), Allison (Admin), EricGrundhauser (Editor)
via Great Train Graveyard | Atlas Obscura.

The Steamrail Rolls into Bendigo Train Station.

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The steamrail rolls in.  by Meg West · · From Snapped: My town
On occasion, the old steamrail rolls through Bendigo on its way through to Echuca.
This can be during the day or in the middle of the night.
We went out for a 1am viewing at the Bendigo Train Station.
Image CreditMeg West, Contributor, Kangaroo Flat VIC 3555.
via ABC OPEN: The steamrail rolls in || From Project: Snapped: My town.

“Locomotives” by Roy Emerson Stryker, 1942.

One of the great innovations in a sea of great things accomplished during the Franklin Roosevelt administrations was the formation of the Farm Security Administration, a division of the government established to help farmers through the devastating Dust Bowl and Great Depression.
A subset of the FSA was a photographic unit which was set up to document the progress made by the FSA (and provide, I am sure, for some much-needed good news, a hearts-and-minds campaign).
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This division was headed by Roy Emerson Stryker, who wound up with the greatest and most beautiful photographic history ever assembled in the United States.
There were about 77,000 images made, and I recall reading (somewhere) that the total budget for the Stryker group for the years 1936-1942 was about $100,000, meaning that each completed image cost just over a dollar apiece.
So far as art funding by the government is concerned, that about the best it has done.
See more at this great website via JF Ptak Science Books: PowerPunk Locomotives, in Color (1942).