Rusting away in The Lebanon.

An old locomotive rusts inside the abandoned Riyaq train station in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley on May 1, 2019.
Rail transport in Lebanon began in the 1890s as French projects under the Ottoman empire, but largely ceased in the 1970s owing to the country’s civil war.
The last remaining routes ended for economic reasons in the 1990s. At its peak, Lebanon had about 408 kilometers of railway.
Image Credit: Photograph by Joseph Eid / AFP / Getty
Source: Photos of the Week: German Asparagus, Traffic Zebras, Enormous Bear – The Atlantic

‘Bob the Railway Dog’ 1882-1895.

Bob the Railway Dog had an insatiable thirst for train travel – he was a dog for all Australians.
THIS SCRUFFY GERMAN COLLIE was born in 1882 with four seriously itchy paws.
At just nine months old, Bob left his home at the Macclesfield Hotel, South Australia, and began his canine career as a hitchhiker on railway locomotives – often taking himself on interstate trips and being welcomed everywhere by friendly train crews.
Peterborough History Group chair Heather Parker says Bob the Railway Dog, as he was later known, was adored throughout his home state and beyond. “He had a wonderful temperament and loved people, particularly the engine drivers,” she says.
“He’d start off going in one direction, he’d get off and think about it for a while – he could pick and choose where he wanted to go – and hop on another train. He liked Broken Hill and he had a friend down in Hindley Street, Adelaide, who used to give him food.”
Adelaide’s “The Advertiser” said in 1939 that, until his death at the distinguished age of 13, Bob traveled freely – “like politicians” – on the trains, suburban trams and even the Murray steamers.
He also attended official functions, The Advertiser reported.

Bob, the railway dog, (sitting on top of the driver’s car) of a stationary locomotive at Port Augusta Railway yard, circa 1887.
Railway staff stand in a group alongside the vehicle. (Photo courtesy of the State Library of South Australia.)
“He was a guest at the banquet for the opening of the railway from Peterborough to Broken Hill and appeared at the opening of the Hawkesbury Bridge in New South Wales.
Bob was happiest on a Yankee engine, said The Petersburg Times: “The big whistle and belching smokestack seem to have an irresistible attraction for him; He lives on the fat of the land, and he is not particular from whom he accepts his dinner.”
News of the traveling dog soon spread, even as far away as England.
In 1895, shortly before Bob died, an E. Cresswell, of Adelaide, wrote to an English magazine, The Spectator, to share Bob’s story.
“His name is Railway Bob and he passes his whole existence on the train – his favourite seat being on top of the coal box,” the author wrote. “He has travelled many thousands of miles, going all over the lines in South Australia.”

A Statue of Bob the Railway Dog in the Main Street of Peterborough, South Australia. (Photo credit: Sulzer55/wikimedia.org)
“The most curious part of his conduct is that he has no master, but every engine driver is his friend.
At night he follows home his engine man of the day never leaving him or letting him out of his sight until they are back on the Railway Station in the morning, where he starts off on another of his ceaseless journeys”.
Continue reading via Bob the railway dog: icon of Australian history – Australian Geographic

The Steamrail Rolls into Bendigo.

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The steamrail rolls in.  by Meg West · · From Snapped: My town
On occasion, the old steamrail rolls through Bendigo on its way through to Echuca.
This can be during the day or in the middle of the night.
We went out for a 1am viewing at the Bendigo Train Station.
Image CreditMeg West, Contributor, Kangaroo Flat VIC 3555.
via ABC OPEN: The steamrail rolls in || From Project: Snapped: My town.

Locomotives by Roy Stryker, 1942.

One of the great innovations in a sea of great things accomplished during the Franklin Roosevelt administrations was the formation of the Farm Security Administration, a division of the government established to help farmers through the devastating Dust Bowl and Great Depression.
A subset of the FSA was a photographic unit which was set up to document the progress made by the FSA (and provide, I am sure, for some much-needed good news, a hearts-and-minds campaign).
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This division was headed by Roy Emerson Stryker, who wound up with the greatest and most beautiful photographic history ever assembled in the United States.
There were about 77,000 images made, and I recall reading (somewhere) that the total budget for the Stryker group for the years 1936-1942 was about $100,000, meaning that each completed image cost just over a dollar apiece.

So far as art funding by the government is concerned, that about the best it has done.
See more at this great website via JF Ptak Science Books: PowerPunk Locomotives, in Color (1942).

Abandoned train tracks and small-town history.

All Photos by Greg Davis
An amateur photographer with a passion for preserving Australian history is using old railway lines to lead him to relics that have withstood the test of time.
Sydney real estate agent Greg Davis spends his spare time photographing neglected and historical buildings, abandoned bridges and disused train stations around Australia.”They were probably good little towns when they were going, but now you go there and there is half a dozen buildings left,” he said.
So far, he has photographed towns in New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland and Western Australia.His most recent expedition was to Western Australia. in March.
Mr Davis edits and researches all the buildings and landmarks so he can provide information with the images.
“I was always amazed by roads that had closed or old bridges, but your parents would never want to stop the car to let you have a look,” he said.
Fast-forward more than 50 years and social media helped him realise other people shared his interest in small-town history.
Source: Amateur photographer follows old train tracks across country to document small-town history – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

London to Fort William by rail.

Some of the world’s wildest and most beautiful scenery is best enjoyed from a train window. From Lhasa to Lima, we choose brilliant and great value routes

Highland flung… the Glenfinnan Viaduct, on the way to Fort William. Photograph: Alan Copson/Getty Images
London to Fort William, UK.  Duration: 13 hours.
The Caledonian Sleeper, one of Britain’s last sleeper services (the other is the Night Riviera to Penzance), is getting a £100m upgrade.
The new trains will have double beds, en suites, Highland food and Arran toiletries.
They’ll run first on the Lowland route from London to Edinburgh/Glasgow in October, then join the Highland route to Fort William next year.
The Highland service, called the Deerstalker, is one of the best train journeys in Britain.
After Glasgow, it goes past Loch Treig to the foot of Ben Nevis. From Fort William, the line continues to Mallaig, across the Glenfinnan viaduct – of Harry Potter fame – for ferries to Skye.
via 18 of the world’s best rail journeys | Travel | The Guardian