Our Very Long Dingo Fence.

58874Image Credit: Photograph by gswell · · From Snapped:
Photograph is of part of the South Australian section of the Australia’s extremely long Dog Fence.
The Dingo Fence or Dog Fence is a pest-exclusion fence that was built in Australia during the 1880s and finished in 1885, to keep dingoes out of the relatively fertile south-east part of the continent (where they had largely been exterminated) and protect the sheep flocks of southern Queensland.
It is one of the longest structures in the world and is the world’s longest fence.
It stretches 5,614 kilometres (3,488 miles) from Jimbour on the Darling Downs near Dalby through thousands of kilometres of arid land ending west of Eyre peninsula on cliffs of the Nullarbor Plain above the Great Australian Bight
Coober Pedy SA 5723
Source: ABC OPEN: A fence too far || From Project: Snapped: Your Top 3

The Impressionist Experience by Richard Forestier.

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Photographer Richard Forestier collaborated with art director Aurélien Bigot to create a photo project titled “The Impressionist Experience”.
impressionist-experience-9The series tries to capture and turn real life into still images.
Bigot uses the key characteristics of famous painters: religious pose, nudity, antique drapery, etc.
“If we recreate scenes with those elements and shoot them with this special technique that imitates the painting texture, we can bring together impressionist art and photography creating the first impressionist photographs.
This will lead the observer to doubt, unsure if faced with a painting or not, eventually realizing that it is indeed an absolutely unedited photograph,” explains the artist.
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See more Images via Artists Create Still Photographs That Look Like Impressionist Paintings | Bored Panda.

3D Spider Dress by Anouk Wipprecht.

Spider-Dress-202092by Shawn Saleme.
3D printing is being explored in many different ways, and Dutch artist Anouk Wipprecht isn’t afraid to use the technology to push the limits of fashion.
Her latest creation is the “spider” dress, which is outfitted with six customized legs that spring out when it senses motion nearby.
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See Also 3-D Printed Plastic Fabric That Flows: New Software Is Making 3-D Technology Wearable
The structure itself was modeled using one of Intel’s Edison modules and is equipped with motion and respiratory sensors that link back the main processor.
If a person approaches the dress too fast, the arms spring up in a defense motion. But if a person approaches slow and smooth, the sensors will make suggestive movements to draw the prey… ahem, person closer.
Keep up to date with Anouk’s latest work on her site.
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via Creepy Couture: A 3D Printed “Spider” Dress That Senses and Reacts to Motion.

The Alfred Manta Ray.

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The Alfred Manta, (Manta alfredi), one of the largest rays on the planet, is currently listed as vulnerable in eastern Australian waters with recorded individuals numbering in the few hundred.
Gary Cranitch’s awe-inspiring image is an important reminder that we still have much to do to ensure the survival of this beautiful species.
Image Credit: Photograph by Queensland Museum: Gary Cranitch
Source: Spectacular science photos nominated for 2014 Eureka Prize – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Reflections in New York.

richard-combes05Reflections: Paintings by Richard Combes
Paintings of buildings reflected on standing water in the streets of New York.
Through his meticulous rendering of detail and dramatic use of perspective and colour.
Combes explores the relationship between architecture and the human form, transforming everyday objects and situations into extraordinary images that are absorbing and often haunting.
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via Faith is Torment | Art and Design Blog: Reflections: Paintings by Richard Combes.