‘Faceless’ by Diego Bardone.

CaptureIn a world of celebrity injunctions and increasingly strict privacy laws, it can be difficult for street photographers to assert their creativity, argues Diego Bardone.

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Based in Milan, the 52-year-old has been documenting his home city for the past nine years.
For his recent project, “Faceless: An Ode to Privacy Laws”, Bardone built up a series of candid shots of strangers – their identities obscured – making for a poignant yet playful reflection on human identity.

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“Mine is a daily diary,” he says, “a tribute to those often unaware actors whom I have the good fortune to meet during my lonely walks in Milan.”
“It’s like I see myself in a sort of virtual mirror:
I’m every single one of them, they are my wandering cheerfulness becoming photography.”
Diego Bardone.
Source: Faceless: The street photography of Diego Bardone | Photography | Culture | The Independent

The Ice Hotel of Quebec.

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Hôtel de Glace. Photo by | Copyright: Creative Commons
Contributor: atimian (Editor)
Comprised of 15,000 tons of snow and 500,000 tons of ice, the Hôtel de Glace, Canada is a massive undertaking, yet each spring it completely disappears.
With only a four-month lifespan, the Ice Hotel takes a month and a half and 60 full-time workers to finish its rooms, but the result is a spectacular blend of chilly, natural architecture and ambient pastel light.
Altogether, the hotel features 85 bedrooms along with a club, art gallery, and even a chapel that usually hosts a handful of weddings.

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Every inch of the hotel is created out of ice, including the furniture.
To make the rooms more livable, beds are covered with furs, blankets and sleeping bags tested to arctic temperatures.
The only areas of the hotel that are heated are a few outdoor bathrooms, along with a few outdoor hot tubs to add to the experience.
Considered an example of a pure ice structure, the hotel is not supported by anything except the icy walls, which can be as thick as four feet to insulate the hotel.
Although you might not get four-star service, the Hôtel de Glace is certainly a unique experience as it changes in layout and complexity every year.
via Hôtel de Glace | Atlas Obscura.

Abbie the Surfing Dog.

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Photo: Abbie is the longest competing surf dog in the world. (Supplied: @abbiesurfs)
by Paige cockburn
The 10-year-old Australian Kelpie rescue dog has just taken first place in the World Dog Surfing Championships at Linda Mar Beach in California.
Abbie had a devastating start to life and was found on the roadside in the Silicon Valley, but was later adopted by Mike who introduced her to the beach in an attempt to rehabilitate her.
“We never planned this … originally we were just doing sports together as a way to bond because she had so much trauma,” Mike says.”She was even afraid of the dark and men, including me at first.
“But doing sports together I could actually measure how much closer we were getting … it built her trust in me.
“Since learning to ride the stick, Abbie has medalled in every competition she has entered and even set a new Guinness World Record for longest wave surfed by a dog — an impressive 107 metres.
But before this, it took some hard work from Mike to change people’s attitudes towards dog surfing and actually consider it a real sport rather than a novelty.

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Photo: (Supplied: @abbiesurfs)
“We tried to push it to be more of a sport … but we did get accused of being competitive,”
Mike says.“However, now everyone is competitive! “The same people who were pissed off at us are now fighting for trophies.
“The transformation has been massive and the world of dog surfing has officially moved from a dress-up event in the shallows, to a truly athletic competition.”
Now read on via A look inside the surprisingly competitive world of dog surfing – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Frozen Trees Lake Ontario

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Christopher Jobson
Landscape photographer Timothy Corbin recently captured some stunning photos of ice-laden tress on the shore of Lake Ontario.
It’s amazing is to see the evidence of what must have been hours of violent waves creating layers of ice that now hover over water or ice that’s now perfectly serene. 
You can see a couple more shots over on his Flickr stream.
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See more Images via Frozen Trees on the Shores of Lake Ontario | Colossal.

Snowfall on a Deserted Platform.

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Photograph by Akinori Koseki, National Geographic Your Shot.
Your Shot member Akinori Koseki was the only one on the train platform in the wee hours of the morning during this snowstorm in Fukushima, Japan.
The photographer caught this train conductor checking his watch just moments before the 5:30 a.m. train was due to pull out of Aizu-Kawaguchi Station on the regional Tadami Line.
Despite the heavy snowfall, the train left on time—helped in part by arriving at a station with no customers.
Source: Photo of the Day: Best of February | PROOF