Waterfall Island, Alto Parana.

ergwgewfwefewWaterfall Island, Alto Parana, Paraguay
Resembling some of the more inspired landscapes from Avatar movie, this spectacular waterfall conceals a wonderful island (shown here), and multiple falls form a singular mind-boggling cascade, making famous Niagara collection of waterfalls pale in comparison:
Technically, this waterfall is called Iguazu Falls on the Argentine side (there is a lookout on San Martin Island which gives the best view) – more info. “Iguazu” literally means “big water”, and in a more romantic way, “legend has it that a god planned to marry a beautiful woman named Naipi, who fled with her mortal lover Taroba in a canoe.
In rage, the god sliced the river, creating the waterfalls and condemning the lovers to an eternal fall.” –
Imgur:  http://bit.ly/1n4Uecx
via Dark Roasted Blend: Pic-of-the-Day: Enchanting Waterfall Island.

‘The Strange Colour of Your Body’s Tears.’

A great majority of movie posters are uninspiring. You know it’s true. They are, by and large, utterly routine and photoshopped affairs with little more to say than “Come and see this new film!”
They all look the same too.
However, a few lucky ones break away from the unadventurous monotony and stand in their own right as pieces of graphic art worthy of a place on any cinephiles’ bedroom or office wall.
Some of them are actually released and others exist as “alternatives” that, thanks to the wonders of the Internet, we can still get to view and admire.
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The Strange Colour of Your Body’s Tears
The clear inspiration is the Art Nouveau movement and its crazed and dreamy association with Absinthe, probably the most famous drink associated with La Belle Époque.
However, “The Strange Colour of Your Body’s Tears” (2013) is a neo-giallo and the art noveau grandeur also cleverly references the famed work of Dario Argento, the Italian maestro behind “Suspiria” (1977) and “Inferno” (1980) as well as classic giallo tropes.
This is a very beautiful piece of artwork that captures the allure and shattering surrealism of the movie.
See more images via 5 Brilliant Modern Movie Posters › Illusion.

‘Owls’ by Brad Wilson.

Photographer Brad Wilson specialises in studio portraits of wild animals, from birds to primates to the diverse wildlife of the African safari.
His book Wild Life includes these portraits of different types of owls which were found at two wildlife sanctuaries and were recovering from various injuries
Photos and Article by Brad Wilson.7c3801d5-32b6-44cf-83ec-1facbddbe3f9-2060x1405Long-eared owldbcd1e72-d012-4142-badf-71be7c9e2f7f-2060x1405
Great horned owl
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 Western screech owl
See more Images via Studio portraits of owls – in pictures | Environment | The Guardian.

A Field of Light at Night in the Red Centre.

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Photo by Bruce Munro
Over 50,000 bulbs light up an expanse of Australia’s Red Centre desert near Ayers Rock in an installation about the size of four football fields.
The solar powered work, Field of Light Uluru, was produced by artist Bruce Munro who conceived the idea while visiting Uluru in 1992.
Twelve years later he created its first installation in a field behind his home, and it has since moved the work around to several different sights across the United Kingdom, United States, and Mexico.
Field of Light was a project that refused to leave the artist’s sketchbook.
“I saw in my mind a landscape of illuminated stems that, like the dormant seed in a dry desert, quietly wait until darkness falls, under a blazing blanket of southern stars, to bloom with gentle rhythms of light,” said Munro.
The British artist is best known for his light installations which often contain components numbering in the thousands.
These large works refer to his own experience as being a tiny element to life’s larger pattern, and employ light as a way to tap into a more emotional response with his viewers.
Profits for the installation will benefit the local community.
The Anangu tribe have named the piece Tili Wiru Tjuta Nyakutjaku in Pitjantjatjara which translates to “looking at lots of beautiful lights.
See more Images via 50,000 Solar Powered Bulbs Illuminate the Australian Desert in Bruce Munro’s Field of Light Installation | Colossal

Destruction in Broome, Western Australia.

1500Ingetje Tadros has been named a finalist in the feature/photographic essay category for her work, which presents an insider’s view of the struggles faced by remote Aboriginal communities undergoing the hardships that stem from dislocation.
This shot shows Meah, a five-year-old, standing outside her family home watching a bulldozer demolishing Kennedy Hill’s office in Broome.
The image reflects the news that the premier of Western Australia, Colin Barnett, committed to closing down about 150 remote Aboriginal communities in Western Australia.
Image Credit: Photograph by Ingetje Tadros/Diimex
Source: Walkley photo of the year: ice addict image wins prestigious award – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian

Sundown at Cape Schanck Lighthouse.

Cape Schank Lighthouse

Cape Schank Lighthouse at Sunset – Photo by Australian Geographic.
The tower was built in 1859 from limestone and painted white. It is the second coastal light established in Victoria.
It is considered by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority to be the most original lighthouse under its jurisdiction.
An unusual feature of this lighthouse is its stone stairway rather than the usual wrought iron.
The present apparatus, installed in 1915 is a first order Chance Brothers lens. Upgrades of this lantern were carried out in 1907, 1917 and 1940.
The original clockwork mechanism is still in place, though the light is now turned by an electric motor.
The lighthouse was renovated from the late 1970s to the early 1980s.
Work included the refurbishment of the lantern.
via The Cape Schanck Lighthouse.