The Thousand-Year Rose of Hildesheim.

r1Photo by Thangmar on Wikipedia | Copyright: Public Domain
Contributor: Josh (Admin)
More of an out-of-control tree than the lilting flower the name might suggest, the Rose of Hildesheim, otherwise known as the Thousand-Year Rose, is thought to be the oldest living rose on the planet, and it looks to continue to be for the foreseeable future since not even bombs can stop it.
Growing up the side of a columnar portion of Germany’s Hildesheim Cathedral, the now-bushy flower is thought to have been planted in the early 800s when the church itself was founded.
Miraculously, the hearty plant slowly crept up the side of the apse for hundreds of years, and still continues bud and bloom each year, producing pale pink flowers once a year (usually around May).

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While the rose bush looks as though it’s big enough to have been growing for a thousand years, the plant has been nearly destroyed a number of times throughout its history.
Most notably the bush was nearly completely razed during the Second World War when Allied bombs annihilated the cathedral.
Every bit of the plant above ground was destroyed, but from the rubble, new branches grew from the root that survived.
Today the the base of the Thousand-Year Rose is protected by a squat iron fence and each of the central roots is named and catalogued to protect one of the oldest pieces of natural beauty one is lucky to find.

via The Thousand-Year Rose | Atlas Obscura.

‘Flowers in Ice’.

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Botanic artist Makoto Azuma has added a completely new spin on the concept of ‘putting it on ice’.
These stunning images depict a range of exotic flowers encapsulated in ice to preserve and present new characteristics, which might have otherwise been overlooked.
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This particular set of works was exhibited in Japan last week, but due to the nature of the material was temporary.
via Putting flowers on ice | Creative Boom.

Plantscapes by Anton Kerner von Marilaun’s Pflanzenleben, 1887.

1022px-Lophophytum+Sarcophyte_sp_vMH373Four remarkable images from the 19th-century Austrian botanist Anton Kerner von Marilaun’s Pflanzenleben, one of his most important works.
Some 20 years after its initial publication in German in 1887 the work was brought to the English speaking world in a translation by F. W. Oliver under the title The Natural History of Plants their Forms, Growth, Reproduction, and Distribution.
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The images here come, via Wikimedia Commons, from Kurt Stüber’s wonderful collection of historical botanical illustrations housed at his BioLib site, definitely worth an explore.
Rhopalocnemis+Helosis_sp_vMH371via “Plantscapes” from Kerner von Marilaun’s Pflanzenleben (1887) | The Public Domain Review.

The Fragile Beauty of Nature.

My name is Katarzyna Załużna.
I live in Poland. I am a mother of three children.
I am an amateur photographer and have become passionate about photography over the past three years.
I love to photograph my children, snails and floral motifs in the sunlight.
I shoot mostly using a manual lens with an old Pentacon.
My photographs are a reflection of my emotional state and spirituality.
Photography is not only my passion, but is a way of expressing myself.
See more images via I Use Macro Lens To Capture Fragile Beauty Of Polish Nature | Bored Panda

The Trees That Refuse To Die.

A Place of Enchantment
Trees have been around for about 370 million years, and as you can from these incredible pictures, there’s a good reason why they’ve survived for so long.
Whether they’re growing in the middle of gale-force winds, on the tops of rocky platforms, inside concrete tunnels, or even growing out of each other, trees know how to survive in places that few living organisms can, which explains why the planet is host to around 3 trillion adult trees that cover an estimated 30% of the earth’s land.

Considering that plants produce the vast majority of the oxygen that we breathe, we should all think ourselves very fortunate that trees are as resilient as they are.
We wouldn’t even be here if they weren’t. Thanks guys! (h/t: twistedsifter)
See more Images via 10+ Badass Trees That Refuse To Die No Matter What | Bored Panda