Approaching Storm Front spooks Tiny Owl.

Image Credit: Photograph by Christopher Brinkman
Franklin County, Dublin, Ireland.
Last fall I was able to spend a few days photographing this Eastern Screech Owl.
On one of the days there storm front moving in, and it was putting the tiny Owl on edge.
I captured this image just as a gust of wind was blowing and grabbed it’s attention.
Source: So much wind – Outdoor Photographer

Desert Tawny Owl discovered.

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Image credit: © Thomas Krumenacker, www.krumenacker.de.
The newly-discovered species, named the Desert Tawny Owl, belongs to the earless owl genus, Strix.
It is a medium-sized owl, 30 to 33 centimeters long, and weighing 140 to 220 grams.
It resembles the Hume’s Owl (Strix butleri) and the Tawny Owl (Strix aluco) in plumage pattern and proportions.
The species’ scientific name, Strix hadorami, honors Israeli ornithologist and writer Hadoram Shirihai.
“It is a special pleasure to name this bird for Hadoram Shirihai, a much-valued colleague and collaborator for 20 years,” Dr Schweizer and his colleagues wrote in a paper in the journal Zootaxa.
“Although Hadoram’s ornithological interests are staggeringly wide-ranging, his name is arguably particularly synonymous with this wonderful owl of wild places in the Middle East.
He discovered, when still a young boy, a live but poisoned specimen (of the Desert Tawny Owl) in En Gedi, which became the first individual to be held in captivity and is now a skeleton in the Tel Aviv University Museum.”
Read on via Desert Tawny Owl: New Species of Bird Discovered | Biology | Sci-News.com.

‘Two Yellow Eyes’ by Archie Tucker.

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Two Yellow Eyes” by Archie Tucker.
See more of Archie Tucker’s photography at aotucker.com.
Photo of the Day is chosen from various Outdoor Photographer galleries, including Assignments, Galleries and the OP Contests.
Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage,
To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.
Source: Photo Of The Day By Archie Tucker – Outdoor Photographer

The Tasmanian Masked Owl.

Author and Photo by Sandra – Tasmania.
Our beautiful Tasmanian Masked Owl (Tyto novaehollandiae castenops) was once described by John Gould (biologist) as ‘…a species distinguished from all other members of its genus by its great size and powerful form.
Probably, few of the Raptorial birds, with the exception of the Eagles, are more formidable or more sanguinary (causing much bloodshed) in disposition.’
After this beauty flew up to the tree tops, I packed up and walked back down to the house to close windows, feed the dog and cat, stoke the woodheater…and go collect more wood in a barrow. It was dark. I had a torch.
Whilst at the  woodpile I heard our chooks cry out. I had not yet closed their door for the night. Rushing in…there she was…looking perplexed…on the floor of the chook house…what’s all the noise about…I’m just after my chicken dinner!
I walked in between the terrified chickens and the owl…shining my torch on the ground so she could still see.
Slowly we turned around and together we left the chook house…both walking in a nonchalant manner.
She then flew up to the fence. I stood next to her…about a rulers length away. We had a quiet moment. I told her it’s not OK to eat the chooks. She let me pat her briefly.
We parted company. I had tears of wonderment.
Source: ABC OPEN: The fragility of life. || From Project: Pic of the Week

The Angry Baby Owl.

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Photograph by Etienne on Flickr
Even owls can have bad days! This baby owl has a feather sticking out and doesn’t look too pleased about it.
Owls, birds of the order Strigiformes, include about 200 species of mostly solitary and nocturnal birds of prey typified by an upright stance, a large, broad head, binocular vision and binaural hearing, and feathers adapted for silent flight.
via Picture of the Day: Angry Bird «TwistedSifter.