16 to 24 year olds prefer Printed books.

Woman-reading-bookSixteen to 24-year-olds are known as the super-connected generation, obsessed with snapping selfies or downloading the latest mobile apps, so it comes as a surprise to learn that 62% prefer printed books to ebooks.
Asked about preferences for physical products versus digital content, printed books jump out as the media most desired in material form, ahead of movies (48%), newspapers and magazines (47%), CDs (32%), and video games (31%).
“It is surprising because we think of 16-24s as being attached to their smartphones and digital devices, so it does shout out,” said Luke Mitchell of agency Voxburner, which researched questions about buying and using content with 1,420 young adults.
The two big reasons for preferring print are value for money and an emotional connection to physical books. On questions of ebook pricing, 28% think that ebooks should be half their current price, while just 8% say that ebook pricing is right.
The top-rated reasons for preferring physical to digital products were: “I like to hold the product” (51%), “I am not restricted to a particular device” (20%), “I can easily share it” (10%), “I like the packaging” (9%), and “I can sell it when used” (6%).
Mitchell said that qualitative comments about preferring physical books included things like “I collect”, “I like the smell”, and “I want full bookshelves”. “Books are status symbols, you can’t really see what someone has read on their Kindle,” Mitchell said.
Voxburner questioned 16-24 year olds online between 25 September and 18 October.
Half of the respondents were sourced through student moneysaving website Studentbeans.com, and half through a broader youth research panel.
via Young adult readers ‘prefer printed to ebooks’ | Books | theguardian.com.

“The Darkness”.

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By Sarah Ann Loreth
Melania Brescia is an introvert, but that hasn’t stopped her from creating a bold and dark body of work that places herself both behind and in front of the camera. Inspired by bouts of sadness and depression, her self-portraiture started as a constructive way to deal with emotions she couldn’t convey in any other way.
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Her images served as a photographic journal of her experiences.
Learning to deal with her extreme introversion, Melania feels most comfortable creating entirely alone, preferring to manage each part of the process from modeling, to shooting, to editing.
Her work touches on a side of life most of us can relate to and there is a bravery in being able to turn those dark periods into beautiful pieces of art.
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Read on further for the Interview with Melania Brescia

http://goo.gl/etVB0g

“Firestorm.”

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Firestorm, from the series The Quiet of Dissolution, 2008.
For its exhibition, the Parasol unit gallery has collected together artists who uncover the weirdness beating at the heart of placid landscapes.
Image Credit: Photograph by Sonja Brass, Fabian & Claude Walter Gallery
See more unusual images via Uncanny valleys: sinister landscapes from around the world – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian

“The Impressionist Experience”.

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Photographer Richard Forestier collaborated with art director Aurélien Bigot to create a photo project titled “The Impressionist Experience”.
impressionist-experience-9The series tries to capture and turn real life into still images.
Bigot uses the key characteristics of famous painters: religious pose, nudity, antique drapery, etc.
“If we recreate scenes with those elements and shoot them with this special technique that imitates the painting texture, we can bring together impressionist art and photography creating the first impressionist photographs.
This will lead the observer to doubt, unsure if faced with a painting or not, eventually realizing that it is indeed an absolutely unedited photograph,” explains the artist.
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See more Images via Artists Create Still Photographs That Look Like Impressionist Paintings | Bored Panda.

“Milky Way Night.”

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Image Credit: Photograph by Dana McMullen,
Lit by a low hanging, sliver of crescent moon, the arch at Joshua Tree glows under the night sky and the Milky Way.
This photograph was created with an image stack of two exposures and two different focal points.
Source: Milk & Cookies Photo by Dana McMullen — National Geographic Your Shot

The Magic of Isabella Stahl.

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From afternoon sunlight beaming through treetops to omnipresent fog and white horses, Stahl captures moments when one might wonder if the impressiveness of nature stretches beyond that of the earthly world.
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Something almost magical is at play in her snapshots, which could very likely be her eye for the divine.
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Stahl does not need to incorporate humans into her landscapes because of her knack for representing the landscapes themselves as interesting and fantastical in their most natural sense.-
Linnie Cole

See more Images via Juxtapoz Magazine – The Work of Isabella Stahl