Steve ‘King of Cool’ Mcqueen in 1963.

In the spring of 1963, already popular from his big-screen breakout as one of The Magnificent Seven and just a couple months away from entering the Badass Hall of Fame with the release of The Great Escape, Steve McQueen was on the brink of superstardom.
Intrigued by his dramatic backstory and his off-screen exploits — McQueen was a reformed delinquent who got his thrills racing cars and motorcycles — LIFE sent photographer John Dominis to California to hang out with the 33-year-old actor and, in effect, see what he could get.

Three weeks and more than 40 rolls of film later, Dominis had captured some astonishing images — photos impossible to imagine in today’s utterly restricted-access celebrity universe.
Here, a series of pictures from what Dominis would look back on as one of his favorite assignments, along with insights about the time he spent with the man who would soon don the mantle, “the King of Cool.”
via A Day in the Life With “The King of Cool” Steve McQueen in 1963 ~ vintage everyday

How Pie-Throwing Became a Comedy Standard,

‘Three actors use pie throwing for comedic effect in the 1947 flick ‘The Perils of Pauline.’
Paramount Pictures/Courtesy of Getty Images
by Anne Ewbank,
One of the last places you might expect to find a commemorative plaque is on a concrete self-storage building in Los Angeles.
But there, on 1712 Glendale Blvd., a plaque memorializes what was once a sprawling film lot known as Keystone Studios.
The film company, now located in present-day Echo Park, was famed for its uproarious slapstick comedies—particularly those involving tossed pies.For over a century, flinging a pie into someone’s face has been a comedy trope, thanks in part to Keystone.
Established in 1912 by director Mack Sennett, the studio was once touted as a comedy pioneer, and had a hand in making pie-throwing ubiquitous.
Yet pie-tossing is a more common stunt in the popular imagination than it is in reality.
This phenomenon can be traced back before the earliest days of pre-1920s silent film.
Tossing a pie into someone’s face for comedic effect first existed on the vaudeville circuit. The hilarity of seeing an elegant dessert hit an an actor, and watching them react with either anger or bewilderment, soon made its way to the screen.
In 1913, Sennett’s muse Mabel Normand and Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle “launched the first such missile in a Keystone film,” notes The Oxford Companion to Food.
Soon, the studio became known for pie-tossing shenanigans, and the high-flying desserts flew so freely that the studio needed its own bakery to make them.
Continue Reading via Source: How Pie-Throwing Became a Comedy Standard – Gastro Obscura

Chromatic Wood Type and Borders 1874.

Specimens of Chromatic Wood Type and Borders (1874)
Some select pages from the exquisite Specimens of Chromatic Wood Type, Borders, Etc. (1874), a specimen book produced by the William H. Page wood type company.
Chromatic types, which were made to print in two or more colours, were first produced as wood type by Edwin Allen, and shown by George Nesbitt in his 1841 Fourth Specimen of Machinery Cut Wood Type.
It is William H Page’s book, however, that is considered to be the highpoint of chromatic wood type production.
As well as providing over 100 pages of brilliantly coloured type, the book can also be seen, at times, to act as some sort of accidental experimental poetry volume, with such strange snippets as “Geographical excursion knives home” and “Numerous stolen mind” adorning its pages.
One wonders whether the decisions about what words to feature and in what order were entirely arbitrary.
Thanks to the wonderful Bibliodyssey blog where we came across the book: visit the post there for more info on the book and a great list of related links.

Source: Specimens of Chromatic Wood Type and Borders (1874) – The Public Domain Review

Dreamy and Romantic Autochromes.

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Belgian painter Alfonse Van Besten (1865-1926) (pictured above) embraced technology, utilizing innovative color processes to transfer black and white photographs into vivid, at times lurid Autochromes.
The tableaux of his Autochromes (a technology patented by the Lumière brothers in 1903 and the first color photographic process developed on an industrial scale) are often bucolic and romantic.
Here is a dreamy Autochrome photo collection that he shot from 1910 to 1915.

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See more images via vintage everyday: 25 Dreamy Autochrome Photos Taken by Alfonse Van Besten in the 1910s

Vintage Swimwear 1940s-1950s.

The mid to late 1940s was a breakthrough period for women’s swimwear, and at its peak was the birth of the pacesetting Bikini in 1946.
And it really boomed in the 1950s.
A postcard set of 69 women in swimsuits from the 1940s and 1950s will bring to you a clearer view.

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See more swimwear via vintage everyday: Vintage Swimwear Revisited – 69 Glamorous Postcards Show Women Swimsuits in the 1940s and ’50s

The Legs of the Opera by Disideri, c1862.

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An unusual creation from the studio of André-Adolphe-Eugène Disdéri, (circa. 1862) the French photographer (pictured below) best known for inventing the hugely popular “carte de visite”.
In this wonderful example, titled “Les Jambes de l’Opera”, Disdéri has created a collage composed entirely of legs belonging to opera (and ballet) stars

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Although his patent on the “carte de visite” initially made him extremely wealthy, Disdéri ended up dying a penniless man.

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His system of reproducing photographs was itself so easy to reproduce that photographers soon did so without Disdéri benefiting, and the format was replaced in the late 1860s by the larger cabinet card format.
Source: The Getty
Read on via The Legs of the Opera (ca. 1862) | The Public Domain Review