Tripe and Aussie Cooking in the 1950s.

tripe_wideweb__470x340,0

by Michael Symons
In Adelaide in the 1950s, my grandmother was our family cook, turning out such standards as shepherd’s pie, lamb chops, and apple pie and custard.
She cooked tripe (see above) in white sauce as a treat. I liked it.
You don’t see tripe (in this case, the lining from a beastie’s second stomach, the reticulum) in your local butcher any more.
It’s something you have to order in advance. 
Tripe is associated with working class northern England nostalgia – flat caps, poverty and grime”.
An after-school favourite was a South Australian specialty, jubilee cake.
This was a teacake with dried fruit, which was iced and sprinkled with coconut. Sliced and buttered it was the best cake in the world.
IMG_2831
Her cooking now seems plain, but unlike many people in the world at that time, she had access to quality ingredients, many of which were gathered from our Adelaide backyard.
Back then the choice in milk was simply the number of pints ladled by the milkman into our billy early each morning.
Bread was delivered by cart, too, and the greengrocer would fill an order from a large green van. Men used special tongs to carry huge, dripping blocks of ice down our gravel drive to the ice chest in the laundry.
My grandfather’s crucial contribution, other than ensuring that I sat with a straight back, was telling stories around the kitchen table.
Read more via Australia’s cuisine culture: a history of food – Australian Geographic.

Hemingway creates a Reading List for a Young Writer.

Hemingway-Reading-List-e1369330871727In 1934 Ernest Hemingway wrote down a list of two short stories and 14 books and handed it to a young out-of-work writer Arnold Samuelson (many of the texts you can find in the Open Culture collection of Free eBooks):
“The Blue Hotel” by Stephen Crane
“The Open Boat” by Stephen Crane
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
Dubliners by James Joyce
The Red and the Black by Stendhal
Of Human Bondage by Somerset Maugham
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann
Hail and Farewell by George Moore
The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
The Oxford Book of English Verse
The Enormous Room by E.E. Cummings
Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
Far Away and Long Ago by W.H. Hudson
The American by Henry James
Read more of this great story via Ernest Hemingway Creates a Reading List for a Young Writer, 1934 – | Open Culture.

Funky Platform Shoes – the Past.

225025_LargeDo you remember the ultra funky platform shoes that were all the rage in the 1970s?
After their use in Ancient Greece for raising the height of important characters in the Greek theatre and their similar use by high-born prostitutes or courtesans in Venice in the 16th Century, platform shoes are thought to have been worn in Europe in the 18th century to avoid the muck of urban streets.
During the Qing dynasty, aristocrat Manchu women wore a form of platform shoe similar to 16th century Venetian chopine.
Platform shoes enjoyed some popularity in the United States, Europe and the UK in the 1930s, 1940s, and very early 1950s, but not nearly to the extent of their popularity in the 1970s and 1980s.
When the biggest, and most prolonged, platform shoe fad in U.S. history began at least as early as 1970 (appearing in both advertisements and articles in 1970 issues of Seventeen magazine), and continued through the late-1980s though not in Europe or the UK where they had all but died out by 1979.
At the beginning of the fad, they were worn primarily by young women in their teens and twenties, and occasionally by younger girls, older women, and (particularly during the disco era) by young men, and although they did provide added height without nearly the discomfort of spike heels, they seem to have been worn primarily for the sake of attracting attention.
Many glam rock musicians wore platform shoes as part of their act.

Sassy Ladies, 1970s

While a wide variety of styles were popular during this period, including boots, espadrilles, oxfords, sneakers, and both dressy and casual sandals of all description, with soles made of wood, cork, or synthetic materials, the most popular style of the early 1970s was a simple quarter-strap sandal with light tan water buffalo-hide straps (which darkened with age), on a beige suede-wrapped cork wedge-heel platform sole.
These were originally introduced under the brand name, “Kork-Ease.”
derwombat

The 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair.

Bird’s-eye view of 1904 World’s Fair buildings from the Administration building. A panoramic view of the construction of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition buildings in the snow. 1904-01-24

In April 1904, St. Louis opened its doors to the world for what was officially called the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, but was widely known as the St. Louis World’s Fair.
Millions of dollars had been spent to build the 1,200-acre fairgrounds and its nearly 1,500 buildings—a huge scale that ended up delaying the opening by a year.
During the eight months the fair stayed open, nearly 20 million people paid a visit. On display were marvels of technology, agriculture, art, and history, and there were amusement rides and entertainment to be found in a section called “the Pike.”
The fair introduced a huge audience to some relatively new inventions such as private automobiles, outdoor electric lighting, and the X-ray machine—as well as foods from across the United States and around the world.
The exposition also had a focus on anthropological exhibits—with an approach that is shocking by today’s standards: In some cases, organizers brought people from the Philippines, the Arctic, and elsewhere to the fairgrounds as set pieces among re-creations of their home environment or villages.
After the fair closed, nearly all of its structures were demolished within a short time, leaving only a few footprints, ponds, and canals in Forest Park in St. Louis.
Source: The 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair: Photos – The Atlantic

Renée Adorée.

793992012928234641

Renee Adoree was born Jeanne de la Fontein in Lille, in Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France on 30 September 1898.
Renee had what one could call a normal childhood. Her background is, perhaps, one of the most difficult to find information on any actress in existence. What we do know that her interest in acting surfaced during her teen years with minor stage productions in France.
By 1920, Renee had gained the notice of American producers and came to New York. Her first film before US audiences was The Strongest that same year.
That was to be it until 1921 when she appeared in Made In Heaven. Renee wondered if she had made the right move by going into motion pictures because of two minor roles in as many films.
Finally MGM saw fit to put her in more films in 1922. Movies such as West Of Chicago, Daydreams, Mixed Faces, and Monte Cristo saw her with meatier roles than she had had previously. Renee was, finally, hitting her stride.
Better roles to be sure, but still she was not of first class caliber yet. All that changed in 1925 when she starred as Melisande with John Gilbert in The Big Parade. The picture made stars out of Renee, Gilbert, and Karl Dane.
Based on the films success, Renee was put in another production that same year in Excuse Me. It lacked the drama the previous picture but was well-received. In a plot written by Elinor Glyn, Renee starred as Suzette in Man and Maid (1925).
1tm9j7bqu83vt198
This was Renee’s most provocative role yet and she was fast becoming one of the sexiest actresses on the screen. In 1927, Renee starred as Nang Ping in Mr. Wu along with her sister Mira. The film was a hit with co-stars Ralph Forbes and Lon Chaney, but it was Renee’s character which carried the film.
After several more films, her career was slowing down. She appeared in a bit part in Show People later that year. The following year she had an uncredited bit role in His Glorious Night.
Re-discovered by First National Pictures after being released by MGM, she appeared in The Spieler (1928) where she was a struggling carnival manager trying to overcome the dishonesty that went on in her organization. Ill with tuberculosis, she retired.
Less than a week after her 35th birthday, Renee died in Tujunga, California on October 5, 1933.
– IMDb Mini Biography By: Denny Jackson
via Renée Adorée – Biography – IMDb.

Chromatic Wood Type and Borders 1874.

Specimens of Chromatic Wood Type and Borders (1874)
Some select pages from the exquisite Specimens of Chromatic Wood Type, Borders, Etc. (1874), a specimen book produced by the William H. Page wood type company.
Chromatic types, which were made to print in two or more colours, were first produced as wood type by Edwin Allen, and shown by George Nesbitt in his 1841 Fourth Specimen of Machinery Cut Wood Type.
It is William H Page’s book, however, that is considered to be the highpoint of chromatic wood type production.
As well as providing over 100 pages of brilliantly coloured type, the book can also be seen, at times, to act as some sort of accidental experimental poetry volume, with such strange snippets as “Geographical excursion knives home” and “Numerous stolen mind” adorning its pages.
One wonders whether the decisions about what words to feature and in what order were entirely arbitrary.
Thanks to the wonderful Bibliodyssey blog where we came across the book: visit the post there for more info on the book and a great list of related links.

Source: Specimens of Chromatic Wood Type and Borders (1874) – The Public Domain Review