“Hibernation.”

c398ystein-sture-aspelund-hibernation-10Dark and somewhat mysterious night shots around locations in Norway by Trondheim-based photographer Øystein Sture Aspelund.
He describes the series entitled Hibernation as “investigating subconsciousness, and the sometimes grey boundary between truth and fiction… utilizing man and his relation to the landscape as an investigative tool.”

oystein-sture-aspelund-hibernation-14

Based upon real places and events, this series intends to catch moments when our daily reality and our subconscious world sometimes strike each other.
It can be seen as a stream of frozen moments, where the story between each frame is as important as the frame itself.

oystein-sture-aspelund-hibernation-20

See more of Øystein Sture Aspelund’s work on Behance or at his website.
Source: Hibernation: Photos by Øystein Sture Aspelund

“Protecting the Kill.”

A female polar bear guards a fresh bearded seal kill on the frozen Templefjord in Svalbard, Norway during the winter sunset.
This won the best Polar Bear photography award determined by FIAP, the International Federation of Photographic Art, at the World Arctic Award.
Prints are available from Joshua Holko’s website.
Photograph credit: Joshua Holko
See more stunning images via Joshua Holko’s award-winning Arctic photography

“Kannesteinen Rock by Dimitrov.”

Kannesteinen Rock, Photograph by Nikolay Geogiev Dimitrov
Kannesteinen Rock is shaped over thousands of years by the crashing waves in this magnificent form like a mushroom.
The rock is located in the rural village of Oppedal, on the island of Vågsøy, approximately 10 km west of the center of Måløy city, Norway.
Source: Kannesteinen Rock, Island Vågsøy, Norway Photo by Nikolay Georgiev Dimitrov — National Geographic Your Shot

“Fanning surfs under Norway’s Northern Lights.”

8117634-1x1-700x700Photo: Mick Fanning was “screaming with excitement” in between riding waves. (Supplied: Emil Sollie, Mats Grimsæth, RedBull)
by Anthony Pancia
In terms of ticking things off the bucket list, Mick Fanning may have trumped just about every surfer on the planet with a once-in-a-lifetime surf under a stunning Northern Lights display in Norway.
Fanning — currently on a hiatus from professional surfing — camped out on a beach in the Norwegian archipelago of Lofoten, Norway with local photographers Emil Sollie and Mats Grimsaeth waiting for the conditions to align and, as it turned out, they didn’t have to wait long.
“We’d set out a 10-day waiting period because there were so many elements that had to come together,” Fanning told the ABC.
PHOTO: Mick Fanning was “screaming with excitement” in between riding waves. (Supplied: Emil Sollie, Mats Grimsæth, RedBull)
“Even then it was a bit of a roll of the dice. You need the right waves, clear skies and on top of all that, you actually need the lights to come on
.”The lights came on for the first two nights, however, the waves refused to co-operate.
“But on the third night we got lucky,” Fanning said. The surfer spent the night riding “surprisingly good” waves as the photographers set to work capturing an image they planned for two years.
Read on via Surfer Mick Fanning rides waves under Norway’s Northern Lights – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

“Surfing the Ends of the Earth”.

120313_burkard_04867

With the sun fading away and the Arctic beginning to turn dark and cold, Dane Gudauskas finds enough warmth to take flight (Lofoten Islands, Norway) (Courtesy of Chris Burkard)
Southern California, Hawaii and Australia are all legendary locales for some of the best surfing in the world, and the pristine beaches and palm trees only add to the allure.
But for Chris Burkard and surfers Patrick Millin, Brett Barley and Chadd Konig, the more exciting waves can be found among the snow-capped mountains, jagged blue ice crystals and the Northern Lights of the Arctic.
This March, a two-man production team followed award-winning surf photographer Chris Burkard and three warm-blooded surfers to the northern 68th parallel, at Unstad Beach in Norway.
The result was a new SmugMug Films short documentary, Arctic Swell: Surfing the Ends of the Earth.
140325_burkard_135049
Although they often times elude us, the Northern Lights have the potential to completely enchant us as well (Courtesy of Chris Burkard)
The California-based Burkard, the senior staff photographer at Surfer magazine, relishes being able to travel great distances to photograph the most interesting surf locales.
He is adept at pairing surfing action against dramatic landscapes.
His recent book, the aptly-titled “Distant Shores: Surfing at the Ends of the Earth,” features surf photography from across five continents.
chris_burkard
Chris Burkard, Photographer.
“I want people to drift away when they look at my images,” says Burkard in the film.
“I want them to feel like it’s taken them so far from where they are at that moment that they’re immersed in that feeling,”
Read more via Meet the Insane Surfers Who Travel to the Arctic Ocean to Catch a Wave | Arts & Culture | Smithsonian.

“Fairy Tale Houses”.

fairy-tale-viking-architecture-norway-11__880Think Norway, and the first thing that comes to mind are fjords, blonde people and Vikings – not fairy tale architecture.
Below, you’ll find photographs of architecture in the Norwegian countryside that looks like it’s been taken straight from a fairy tale.
fairy-tale-viking-architecture-norway-1__880
The architectural styles range from Stave churches, which were built during the Middle Ages, to ghostly natural waterfalls and traditional wooden houses constructed in the Norwegian vernacular style (byggeskikk) during the 19th century.

norway-fairytale-ancient-architecture-church-design-4__880

See more images via 16+ Pics Of Fairy Tale Architecture From Norway | Bored Panda