Abandoned School in the Vanishing West, Fresno.

Abandoned School in Fresno.
Image Credit: Photograph by Robert Cassway – Montana, USA
‘This photo shows the ravages of time and weather on a building that was left to decay after the families that lived in Fresno moved away.
It is part a larger series of photographs titled The Vanishing West’
via The walls have eyes: the best urban photography | Cities | The Guardian

Furtherrr’s Psychedelic Mural in Denver.

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Furtherrr mural by Mars-1, Damon Soule, and Oliver Vernon on Cultivate, Denver.
The acclaimed artists initiative Furtherrr created a stunning, visceral, psychedelic mural on the East facing wall of Cultivate in Denver.
The talented trio works harmoniously to create an almost alien experience, disassociating people with their expectations of art and instead taking them on a journey of the minds-eye.
It will make you question your perception of reality like an acid trip.
A good one, depending on the lighting.
See more Images via The Best Denver Street-Art of The Season Part 2 – 303 Magazine.

Aurora Ice Museum Chena Hot Springs, Alaska.

imagePhoto by | Copyright: Eric Dubya
Contributor: Rachel (Admin)
Located at the Chena Hot Springs Resort, the Aurora Ice Museum is the world’s largest year-round ice environment.
You may be wondering just what this means exactly – it means jousting knights, polar bear bedrooms, a 2-story snowball fight structure, and perfectly chilled cocktails in icy martini glasses for visitors of age.

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Champion ice carver Steve Brice has created a winter wonderland of ice sculptures depicting all sorts of crazy shenanigans for the polar region, including entire rooms built out of ice and the awkwardly fascinating “ice outhouse.”
Igloos, spheres, a giant chess set, and a full-sized pair of knights jousting on horses are just a few of the amazing examples of Brice’s work.
The entire place is lit up with ice chandeliers that splay the colors of the Aurora Borealis across the glimmering walls, and everything at the bar, from the glasses to the bar itself, are crafted from ice harvested locally and shaped for your delight.
The ambitious beginnings of the museum were to create an ice hotel, but it was decided that being a year-round ice environment was a lofty enough undertaking, and they scaled down to a museum.
Edited by: Martin, Mark Casey (Admin), Allison (Admin), EricGrundhauser (Admin)
See more via Aurora Ice Museum | Atlas Obscura.

The Ice Hotel of Quebec Province.

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Hôtel de Glace. Photo by | Copyright: Creative Commons
Contributor: atimian (Editor)
Comprised of 15,000 tons of snow and 500,000 tons of ice, the Hôtel de Glace, Canada is a massive undertaking, yet each spring it completely disappears.
With only a four-month lifespan, the Ice Hotel takes a month and a half and 60 full-time workers to finish its rooms, but the result is a spectacular blend of chilly, natural architecture and ambient pastel light.
Altogether, the hotel features 85 bedrooms along with a club, art gallery, and even a chapel that usually hosts a handful of weddings.

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Every inch of the hotel is created out of ice, including the furniture.
To make the rooms more livable, beds are covered with furs, blankets and sleeping bags tested to arctic temperatures.
The only areas of the hotel that are heated are a few outdoor bathrooms, along with a few outdoor hot tubs to add to the experience.
Considered an example of a pure ice structure, the hotel is not supported by anything except the icy walls, which can be as thick as four feet to insulate the hotel.
Although you might not get four-star service, the Hôtel de Glace is certainly a unique experience as it changes in layout and complexity every year.
via Hôtel de Glace | Atlas Obscura.

Daybreak at Monument Valley.

Image Credit: Photograph by Lidija Kamansky.
A storm was rolling in from the west and the few of us gathered for sunrise were watching and hoping that day would break before the rains came.
The moment the sun peeked above the horizon, we were hit with incredible winds and sideways driving rain.
My husband jumped behind me to block the blowing sand and to try to shelter me from the wind.
I kept shooting as the skies lit up, while gripping the tripod to keep it steady.
This image is the result of those efforts from this memorable sunrise!
Source: Daybreak at Monument Valley Photo by Lidija Kamansky — National Geographic Your Shot

Aurora over Brooks Range in Alaska.

Image Credit: Photograph by © Fred Wasmer. All rights reserved.
A bright aurora appears over a homestead in the Brooks Range of northern Alaska on the morning of 23 March, 2015.
Fred Wasmer, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America
Member since 2014
Source: Aurora Over Homestead | Smithsonian Photo Contest | Smithsonian