“Glaciers.”

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The 8.1 miles of the Fox Glacier in New Zealand’s Westland Tai Poutini National Park form an ever-transforming terrain of ice caves and glacial terminal that is bordered on all sides by rainforests and mountains.
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photograph by anoldent/Flickr user
Along with its neighbor Franz Josef Glacier, it’s one of the world’s most accessible glaciers for exploring, and regular guided tours are available.
The glacier has been advancing since 1985 after decades of retreating, and with all the movement and melting stunning ice caves have been revealed.
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However, gorgeous as it is, solo wandering is not advised as there is a danger of ice breaks and rockfalls that in the past have proved fatal.
Edited by: Rachel (Admin)
via Fox Glacier | Atlas Obscura.

“Descent Into the Lost World.”

Image Credt: Photograph by © Ben Babusis. All rights reserved.
Descent into the Lost World
A group of rappellers descends into one of the most spectacular limestone caves on the North Island of New Zealand called the Lost World.
“Rappeller” – a person who descends down a nearly vertical face by using a doubled rope that is wrapped around the body and attached to some high point. Source: The Free Dictionary.
Source: Descent Into the Lost World | Smithsonian Photo Contest | Smithsonian

“New Zealand is Brilliant.”

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New Zealand’s first sheep were set ashore by Captain James Cook in 1773.
At their peak in 1982, there were twenty-two sheep for every person in New Zealand.
Nowadays, the numbers have fallen by two thirds and are now estimated at just over seven sheep per person.
Photograph: Nick Easton/BBC

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See more images via New Zealand: Earth’s Mythical Islands – in pictures | Environment | The Guardian

“The Mythical Milford Sound.”

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Milford Sound, perhaps New Zealand’s most famous scenic location, was long overlooked by early sailors and explorers, who didn’t realise the narrow entrance concealed an enormous and beautiful interior.
It wasn’t discovered by Europeans until 1812.
Named the eighth ‘wonder of the world’, its actually one of the wettest places on Earth, with rainfall creating cascades of waterfalls, some reaching a 1,000m in length.
Photograph by: Tom Walker/BBC
Source: New Zealand: Earth’s Mythical Islands – in pictures | Environment | The Guardian

“Milford Sound.”

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Photograph Credit: Craig Grieve
I left home in Invercargill at 3 am in order to get to Milford Sound for dawn and had rain the whole trip.
As I traveled up the road from Te Anau toward Milford I was getting concerned that it may have been a wasted journey but as I sat in my car and waited for the sun to came up, the rain cleared and left me with this magnificent visage.
Having dodged the infamous sandflies I had an enjoyable breakfast at the Cafe then headed for home.
The beauty of this place is unparalleled and every visit brings a different emotion.
Source: Smugshot: Readers’ travel photos of the week | Stuff.co.nz

Glow Worms Turn Cave Into Starry Night,

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by Shaun Jeffers
Something quite special dwells beneath the surface of New Zealand and these images prove that the country is just as beautiful below ground as it is above!
The Waitomo area is famous for it’s limestone caves and within these caves are one of the most magical insects in the world, the glowworm.
Glow worms emit a phosphorescent glow that light up the cave and create a surreal environment.
Over the past year I have been back and forth to Waitomo’s Ruakuri Cave to master the art of photographing these magnificent little creatures – it’s been quite the experience!
When the headlamps are out and all you can see are the glowworms, you can’t help but feel like you’ve stepped into James Cameron’s Avatar Pandora, it’s just unreal!

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Photographing glow worms is very similar to shooting the night sky, however the exposure time can be much longer.
These images in particular range between 30 seconds and 6 minutes exposures.
To achieve the shots, it required me to submerge myself and my tripod in cold water for up to 6-8 hours a day – it was totally worth it!
More info: shaunjeffersphotography.com
Source: Glow Worms Turn New Zealand Cave Into Starry Night And I Spent Past Year Photographing It | Bored Panda