Reflection on Lone Tree, Lake Wanaka.

wanaka-fog_93384_990x742Photograph by Yusri Salleh, National Geographic Your Shot
In May 2015, Your Shot member Yusri Salleh took his “first photo adventure,” a ten-day trip to New Zealand, where he captured this image of the famed lone tree of Lake Wanaka.
Setting the scene required some consideration. “When we arrived at the planned location, there were almost 30 photographers there!” writes Salleh. “The fog was too thick and the color was dull.
A black-and-white image was the best option for the situation.
I wanted the image to be moody, quietly [mysterious], and different.
Source: Lone Tree in a Lake Image, New Zealand – National Geographic Photo of the Day

Milky Way, Dunedin.

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Image Credit: Photograph by Stefan Mutch, My Shot
This was taken on the Otago Peninsula near Dunedin, New Zealand.
I was hoping to capture some aurora activity.
There was no aurora that night, but there was high humidity, so the light from the city was reflected over the entire sky, even though we were well away from the city.
Instead of the usual gold or orange glow, the sky took on a red hue that was clearly visible to the naked eye.
Stefan Mutch via Photo of the Day: Best Pictures of April 2013, Gallery – National Geographic.

‘The Stanhope Press’.

Nearly 400 years after the birth of letterpress printing in Europe, a press came ashore with early settlers in New Zealand.
William Colenso (1835), was the first real New Zealand book printer with his “Stanhope” press, creating Maori and general ecclesiastical items.

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A drawing of the original Stanhope press design. None of these are known to exist today.
Samuel Revans published the first newspaper “The New Zealand Gazette”, in 1840 near the Petone foreshore.
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Printing is the medium which reflected the growth of this new country (170 newspapers came into existence by 1870) to meet the communication and information needs of a growing colony.
The development of letterpress printing in New Zealand can justly be said to mirror our nation’s history, we are determined that the principles and processes should not be lost.
via The Printing Museum.

Yellow TreeHouse Restaurant, Auckland.

1065305043These days, a tree house design is much more than just a playhouse in the backyard.
We’ve seen creative concepts from HemLoft, an egg-shaped tree house, to TreeHouse Point, a charming bed and breakfast nestled in the trees.
Another incredibly unique construction is this Yellow Treehouse Restaurant, developed by New Zealand based Pacific Environment Architects in collaboration with Yellow Pages.
Located north of Auckland, the unique concept is an eighteen seat cafe suspended around a large redwood tree and approximately 130 feet above the ground.
The entire structure spans more than 30 feet wide and almost 40 feet high, with kitchen and bathrooms located on the ground below.
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Timber trusses form the main structure, the curved fins are glue-laminated pine, and redwood milled from the site are used in the walkway balustrading.
Plantation poplar slats wrap around the tree and create interesting textured spaces that allow natural light to radiate throughout the interior.
The circular concept is also designed to be weather resistant, with acrylic sheeting fixed to the roof and vertical roll-down blinds on the interior.
Visitors are welcome to come and venture high up in the trees to enjoy a delicious meal.
via Stunning Tree House Restaurant Suspended 130-Feet Above Ground – My Modern Metropolis.

Glowworms transform Cave into Starry Sky.

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By venturing into the 30-million-year-old limestone caves on New Zealand’s North Island, photographer Joseph Michael was able to capture magical images of the glowworms that call this place home.
Against the natural backdrop that the cave provides, it looks as though there are hundreds of miniature, blue-tinted stars, but this is actually the work of glowworms known as Arachnocampa luminosa.
Using a long-exposure method, the photographer was able to capture the glowworm larvae and their enchanting light in a way that makes the limestone formation look as though it’s an indoor, starry sky.
In the close-up photos, you may notice that something is hanging from the bioluminescent gnat larva.
Glowworm7These are the twinkling larvae’s nests, which are composed of up to 70 silk threads that contain droplets of mucus.
In order to attract prey into these threads, the larvae glow bright, but not all continue to do so once they become adults. Male glowworms will stop glowing a few days after emerging from the nest, while the females’ glow will increase in order to attract a mate.
With this in mind, it seems that the photographer caught the glowworms at the perfect time for his Luminosity series.
Read more via Glowworms Transform a New Zealand Cave into an Enchanting Starry Sky – My Modern Met.