Mount Ngauruhoe by Jules Drayton.

Mount Ngauruhoe
Image Credit: Photograph by Jules Drayton, (United Kingdom).
Mount Ngauruhoe is an active volcano, made up from layers of lava and tephra, she rises to 2291m.
It is the youngest vent in the Tongariro National Park and first erupted about 2,500 years ago.
Although seen by most as a volcano in its own right, it is technically a secondary cone of Mount Tongariro.
The volcano lies between the active volcanoes of Mount Tongariro to the north and Mount Ruapehu to the south, to the west of the Rangipo Desert and 25 kilometres to the south of the southern shore of Lake Taupo.
Source: Mount Ngauruhoe 4/4 – Landscape & Rural Photos – Jules’s Photoblog

Glowworms turn Cave into Starry Sky.

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By venturing into the 30-million-year-old limestone caves on New Zealand’s North Island, photographer Joseph Michael was able to capture magical images of the glowworms that call this place home.
Against the natural backdrop that the cave provides, it looks as though there are hundreds of miniature, blue-tinted stars, but this is actually the work of glowworms known as Arachnocampa luminosa.
Using a long-exposure method, the photographer was able to capture the glowworm larvae and their enchanting light in a way that makes the limestone formation look as though it’s an indoor, starry sky.
In the close-up photos, you may notice that something is hanging from the bioluminescent gnat larva.
Glowworm7These are the twinkling larvae’s nests, which are composed of up to 70 silk threads that contain droplets of mucus.
In order to attract prey into these threads, the larvae glow bright, but not all continue to do so once they become adults. Male glowworms will stop glowing a few days after emerging from the nest, while the females’ glow will increase in order to attract a mate.
With this in mind, it seems that the photographer caught the glowworms at the perfect time for his Luminosity series.
Read more via Glowworms Transform a New Zealand Cave into an Enchanting Starry Sky – My Modern Met.

‘Owls’ by John Pusateri.

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Using pencils, charcoal, and pastels artist John Pusateri creates near photo-realistic drawings of beautifully colored owls.
Pusateri currently teaches in the Department of Architecture at Unitec, New Zealand and  has a number of works available through Seed Gall.
owl-4See more from this owl series in his portfolio. (via devid sketchbook, thnx jessica)
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via Colored Owl Drawings by John Pusateri | Colossal.

Milky Way, Dunedin.

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Image Credit: Photograph by Stefan Mutch, My Shot
This was taken on the Otago Peninsula near Dunedin, New Zealand.
I was hoping to capture some aurora activity.
There was no aurora that night, but there was high humidity, so the light from the city was reflected over the entire sky, even though we were well away from the city.
Instead of the usual gold or orange glow, the sky took on a red hue that was clearly visible to the naked eye.
Stefan Mutch via Photo of the Day: Best Pictures of April 2013, Gallery – National Geographic.

The Magic of New Zealand.

Magic of New Zealand,
Image Credit: Photograph by Jingshu Zhu
Winner of the landscape category. Sydney accountant Jingshu Zhu captured her winning landscape-category portfolio on a trip to New Zealand’s South Island in August 2017, a place she describes as a paradise for landscape photography
Source: Australia’s 2018 Photographer of the Year awards – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian

Guardians of Lake Wakatipu.

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Image Credit: Photograph by Brad Grove.
Trees stand like guardians at the top of Lake Wakatipu on New Zealand’s South Island.
Says Brad Grove, a member of our Your Shot community: “I first discovered these trees by the Glenorchy jetty back in April 2011 and had never really been happy with my efforts to shoot them.”
Grove achieved this HDR image in June 2012, after approaching the trees from a different direction.
“It was minus 4 [degrees Celsius] on a very cold morning, and the sun had just broken the horizon behind me,” he says. “The composition fell into place, and I took seven exposures hoping I had enough data to produce the image I could see in my head.”
Source: Photo of the Day: Best Pictures of September 2013, Gallery – National Geographic