“16thC. Prayer Nuts.”

prayernut1AlbertKunsthistorischesMuseum16th-Century Netherlandish prayer nuts are intricately carved wood items of devotion, and when one is closed it looks like an elaborate nut.
These symbols of status from the Middle Ages were worn on a rosary, a belt or a sack by the wealthy in northern Europe.
prayernut2britishmuseumOnly a few inches in diameter, these prayer nuts hold insanely detailed religious scenes, tiny treasures for those who could afford them.
Now they are on display at respectable institutions around the world.
via mymodernmet
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via Juxtapoz Magazine – 16th-Century Netherlandish Carved Prayer Nuts.

“The Magic Of the Forest.”

These photos were all taken in the Netherlands by albertdros.com. Zig Zag Zig Zag Curvy roads between trees can create an amazing effect when using long lenses to photograph them.
The Netherlands is famous for the beautiful canals in Amsterdam, the tulips and of course the windmills. The Netherlands also has some beautiful forests that you can get lost in for hours.
Forests are something different than normal landscapes. Especially for photographers, forests offer tons of different compositions even in a very small area because of the different lining and shapes of the trees.

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Also, they always look different with different light. These last few days have been very misty in my country. All the people around me are complaining about it being ‘grey’ and depressing. I always tell them: ‘Take a stroll around your local forest, you’ll be amazed by the beautiful atmosphere.’ Because that’s where forests become magical: when there is fog separating the trees from each other it’s like walking in a fairytale.
But in any condition, forests always offer a great sense of peace and are relaxing to walk around in. Of course forests look very different from season to season but there is almost always something beautiful to see.

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In summer the forests are nice and green. My favourite time is autumn when the trees start to get all kinds of colour. But I love winter too. When the leaves fell of the trees, all that’s left is the distinct shapes of the tree branches, often creating magical or spooky atmospheres.
It doesn’t matter how the light is. But sometimes, I’d like to forget about photographing and just enjoy the beautiful silence the forests offer. I can recommend it to everyone that has forests, small or big, around them.
Take some time to walk around for an hour or two. It’s extremely relaxing and a great stress reliever too!
See more images via 10+ Photos That Reveal The Magic Of Dutch Forests | Bored Panda

“Amsterdam at Night”.

00341fc0445a1286809d97bfcfad7b5242b4408f_800Life in Amsterdam is always interesting.
Particularly at night, when the Dutch capital’s streets come alive with both locals and the usual tourists sampling anything and everything this wonderful place has to offer.
Enter Julie Hrudova, a street and documentary photographer born in Prague, now based in Amsterdam.
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Her latest series, Amsterdam at Night, shows a fascinating and atmospheric collection of life after dark in the Dam – picking up on the emotions and spirit of the city’s inhabitants.
Discover more of her beautiful work at http://www.juliehrudova.com.
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See more Images via Atmospheric street photography of Amsterdam at night | Creative Boom.

Rembrandt’s “Claudius Civilis”.

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Rembrandt van Rijn, ‘The Conspiracy of the Batavians under Claudius Civilis’ (1661-62). The Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Sweden
Owned by the Royal Swedish Academy of Fine Arts, the painting has been at the National museum of Art in Stockholm for more than 150 years, leaving Sweden only twice in that time, in 1925 and 1969.
Both of those occasions were for showings at the Rijksmuseum.
Rembrandt painted The Conspiracy of the Batavians Under Claudius Civilis, Claudius Civilis for short, in 1661-1662 under a commission from the burgomasters of Amsterdam.
The enormous canvas, originally 550 cm high and 550 cm wide, was far and away the largest, most prestigious painting of his long career.
The work was intended to be part of a series of eight equally large paintings depicting Batavian history to be hung in the new Amsterdam Town Hall (now the Royal Palace Amsterdam).
READ ON via Rembrandt’s Claudius Civilis temporarily on view at the  Rijksmuseum.

“Grotesques”.

12461190134_b8a9004a14_bVery little is known about the Dutch artist Arent van Bolten.
We do know he was born at Zwolle ca. 1573 and was actually a silversmith by profession.
His artistic output ranged from grotesque figures and monsters, to figural scenes from the Bible and mythology.
Here is a selection of the former, held by the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam and produced sometime in the early 17th century.
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See more Grotesques via Arent van Bolten’s Grotesques | The Public Domain Review.

“Sheepdog Sisters.”

old-english-sheepdog-dog-sisters-sophie-sarah-cees-bol-23Sophie and Sarah, a pair of Old English sheepdog sisters living in the Netherlands, are a couple of regular hams when it comes to posing for photos.
And that’s OK with their owner Cees Boll, an amateur photographer who loves to follow them around as they post for the camera together with the rest of their sheepdog friends.
6-year-old Sophie and 4-year-old Sarah are sisters from different litters, but they’re still inseparable.
They love to pose (especially since they sometimes receive treats for doing so), and they’ve posed in plenty of beautiful locations – from the fields of Sibculo in the Netherlands where they live to the Austrian Alps.
“The main reason I take the photos is so I can make people happy and put a smile on their face – well, Sophie and Sarah do,” Boll told the Dailymail. “In a world full of bad things, I found a way to make it a little bit brighter.
And seeing people happy makes me happy.“
via Extremely Photogenic Sheepdog Sisters That Love To Do Everything Together | Bored Panda.