The Glory of Woodstock Is how they Managed to Clean Up.

The crowd was much, much bigger than expected, which helped turn a music festival into the stuff of legend.
Photo Credit: John Dominis/The LIFE Picture Collection via Getty Images
Fifty years ago, a farm in Bethel, New York, traded 650 Guernsey cows for 400,000 human beings and a lot—a whole lot—of drugs. A few of those humans were famous, and were there to play music for the rest of them.
The occupation there was brief, but intensive. It was August 1969, and the site has been widely interpreted as a kind of mass ritual gathering.
It’s also been interpreted as Woodstock.“For many hippies,” says Damon Bach, a historian at Texas A&M University, “it was three halcyon days where they were immersed in their ideal microsociety.
”Woodstock brings certain sounds and images to mind. Jimi Hendrix’s iconic “Star Spangled Banner.” Joe Cocker’s croon. Sha Na Na’s anachronism.
Masses of people rolling around in mud, if just for a little while. And when the last notes of Hendrix’s “Hey Joe” faded, there was little to do in Bethel besides head home. But not before cleaning up.
Archaeologists excavate test units in the general area of the stage. Public Archaeology Facility, Binghamton University
Since the concert, not much has happened on the Woodstock site.
There have been some anniversary events, sure, but nothing even remotely approaching the scale and impact of the first.
This makes life easier for the archaeologists who have been digging into the material history of the legendary festival.
Over the past two years, researchers from Binghamton University, in conjunction with the Museum at Bethel Woods, conducted excavations and surveys on the site, to see what 72 hours of peace and love look like 50 years later.
Source: The True Glory of Woodstock Is That They Managed to Clean Up So Well – Atlas Obscura

The highs of Woodstock, 1969.

Concert-goers at Woodstock, 1969. ‘What people were trying to do was get higher, spiritually.’ Photograph: Elliott Landy/The Image Works
Throughout the Woodstock music festival, which celebrates its 50th anniversary later this month, concert-goers scaled 70ft sound towers to get a better look at what was happening on stage.
Depending on your view, this was either “insanely dangerous”, as production coordinator John Morris described it in Woodstock: An Oral History – the towers weren’t set up to hold all that extra weight and one fallen structure could have killed “hundreds of people” – or an expression of the joyful sense of freedom that pervaded the four-day event in August 1969.
For photographer Elliott Landy, who captured the climbers during his in-depth coverage of Woodstock, the ascent of the sound towers, though dangerous, has a broader meaning.
‘It really symbolises the nature of the 60s,” he says, “which was that people were trying to get higher’.
Source: The big picture: the highs of Woodstock | Art and design | The Guardian

Scientists show Drunk birds slur their Songs.

imrsBird, go home, you are drunk. (AP Photo/Rawlins Daily Times, Jerret Raffety, File)
Sometimes science means getting a bunch of finches sloshed. Or at least giving them blood alcohol levels of around .08 percent, which is pretty crazy by bird standards.
In a study published last week in PLOS ONE, researchers from the Oregon Health and Science University tempted zebra finches with spiked juice — but not because they wanted to help the lab animals ring in the new year in style.
The researchers study birdsong to learn more about human speech. Birds learn to sing in much the same way that humans learn to talk (in fact, a recent study found that birdsong and speech even rely on the same genes).
It’s much easier to keep a bird in a cage and study its brain than it is to do the same with a human toddler, so birds give scientists some of our best insights into the brain mechanisms that make speech possible.
If you’ve ever talked to someone under the influence of alcohol, you know that it makes speech more difficult. But there hasn’t been much research on vocal impairment caused by alcohol — mostly because scientists have so few non-human lab animals capable of “speech” to work with.
“At first we were thinking that they wouldn’t drink on their own because, you know, a lot of animals just won’t touch the stuff,” researcher Christopher Olson told NPR, “But they seem to tolerate it pretty well and be somewhat willing to consume it.”
And once the birds were buzzed, they started to slur their songs.
“The most pronounced effects were decreased amplitude and increased entropy,” the researchers wrote in the study.
So in other words, their songs got quieter and less organized.
Read more via Scientists show that drunk birds ‘slur’ their songs – The Washington Post.

Neil Young through the Years.

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For the first time, the Morrison Hotel Gallery is hosting an exhibition in all three of their locations – Long May You Run, a retrospective of Neil Young, charts his rise from Buffalo Springfield to refusing to settle down in his 70s.

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2080

See more on Neil Young via Neil Young: an artist through the years – in pictures | Music | The Guardian

Seeburg Select-O-Matic Jukebox,1948.

Myron Holbert, shown with the Seeburg Selec-O-Matic "200" library demonstrated for the first time in Los Angeles, April 2, 1948. It stores and automatically plays 200 selections which are accomplished by merely setting a lever to play either side or both sides of any record in the whole library and the whole library can be played without anyone touching the records. A revolutionary development is the playing of both sides of the record without turning it over. (AP Photo)

Myron Holbert, shown with the Seeburg Select-O-Matic “200” library demonstrated for the first time in Los Angeles, April 2, 1948. It stores and automatically plays 200 selections which are accomplished by merely setting a lever to play either side or both sides of any record in the whole library and the whole library can be played without anyone touching the records. A revolutionary development is the playing of both sides of the record without turning it over. (AP Photo)

In this photo from April of 1948 we see engineer Myron Holbert, who’s showing off the Seeburg Select-O-Matic jukebox.
The machine held a relatively enormous library of music — 200 selections!
And although the jukebox became a symbol of the postwar teen music explosion, it predates the 1950s.
In fact, it was during the 1930s that America saw an incredible rise in the number of jukeboxes filling dance halls and diners.
Source: This Was a Jukebox in 1948

‘Auld Lang Syne’ by Robbie Burns, 1796.

robert_burnsThe most commonly sung song for English-speakers on New Year’s eve, “Auld Lang Syne” is an old Scottish song that was first published by the poet Robert Burns in the 1796 edition of the book, Scots Musical Museum.
Burns transcribed it (and made some refinements to the lyrics) after he heard it sung by an old man from the Ayrshire area of Scotland, Burns’s homeland.
It is often remarked that “Auld Lang Syne” is one of the most popular songs that nobody knows the lyrics to. “Auld Lang Syne” literally translates as “old long since” and means “times gone by.”
The song asks whether old friends and times will be forgotten and promises to remember people of the past with fondness, “For auld lang syne, we’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet.
“The lesser known verses continue this theme, lamenting how friends who once used to “run about the braes,/ And pou’d the gowans fine” (run about the hills and pulled up the daisies) and “paidl’d in the burn/Frae morning sun till dine” (paddled in the stream from morning to dusk) have become divided by time and distance—”seas between us braid hae roar’d” (broad seas have roared between us).
Yet there is always time for old friends to get together—if not in person then in memory—and “tak a right guid-willie waught” (a good-will drink).

guylombardi

But it was bandleader Guy Lombardo, and not Robert Burns, who popularized the song and turned it into a New Year’s tradition. Lombardo first heard “Auld Lang Syne” in his hometown of London, Ontario, where it was sung by Scottish immigrants.
When he and his brothers formed the famous dance band, Guy Lombardo and His Royal Canadians, the song became one of their standards. Lombardo played the song at midnight at a New Year’s eve party at the Roosevelt Hotel in New York City in 1929, and a tradition was born.
Source: New Year’s Traditions