Louis Armstrong plays Jazz for the Pyramids of Giza, 1961.

Original caption: 28 January, 1961, Pyramids of Giza, Egypt—
American jazz trumpeter Louis Armstrong plays the trumpet while his wife sits listening, with the Sphinx and one of the pyramids behind her, during a visit to the pyramids at Giza in 1961.
Image Credit: Photograph by Bettmann / Getty
Source: Weird, Wonderful Photos From the Archives – The Atlantic

The Beatles’ last unhappy Photo session.

‘This marriage had come to an end – and boy did it show’ … the Beatles’ last photo session, in August 1969.
Photograph: Ethan Russell/© Apple Corps Ltd/All rights reserved‘
George Harrison was miserable from frame one to frame 500,” says Ethan Russell. “He was so over it. I don’t think he did anything but scowl for three hours.”
The photographer is recalling the day he unknowingly took the last ever shot of the Beatles together. It was 22 August 1969, and they were all at John Lennon’s countryside estate near Ascot.
“Paul was trying to hold it together,” he adds. “He had his arms crossed like, ‘Come on, lads!’
But the concept of the Beatles just didn’t sync with who they were any more.
I could have asked them to smile, but it would have been totally fake and I’m glad I didn’t.
This marriage had come to an end – and boy does it show.”
Source: ‘I took the last ever shot of the Beatles – and they were miserable!’ | Art and design | The Guardian

Freddie Mercury, 1946-1991.

freddi_merkuri
Photo: Freddie Mercury as a baby.
Freddie Mercury (born Farrokh Bulsara; 5 September 1946 – 24 November 1991) was a British singer, songwriter and record producer, known as the lead vocalist and co-principal songwriter of the rock band Queen.
He also became known for his flamboyant stage persona and four-octave vocal range. Mercury wrote and composed numerous hits for Queen (“Bohemian Rhapsody,” “Killer Queen,” “Somebody to Love,” “Don’t Stop Me Now,” “Crazy Little Thing Called Love,” and “We Are the Champions.”); occasionally served as a producer and guest musician (piano or vocals) for other artists; and concurrently led a solo career while performing with Queen.

Photo: Rami Malek starred in the 2018 Movie ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’.
Freddy Mercury was born of Parsi descent in the Sultanate of Zanzibar and grew up there and in India until his mid-teens, before moving with his family to Middlesex, England — ultimately forming the band Queen in 1970 with Brian May and Roger Taylor.
Mercury died in 1991 at age 45 due to complications from AIDS, having acknowledged the day before his death that he’d contracted the disease.
In 1992 Mercury was posthumously awarded the Brit Award for Outstanding Contribution to British Music, with a tribute concert held at Wembley Stadium, London.
As a member of Queen, he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2001, the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2003, the UK Music Hall of Fame in 2004, and the band received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2002.
Source: Freddie Mercury – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Chimps Love Boppy Music.

While preferring silence to music from the West, chimpanzees apparently like to listen to the different rhythms of music from Africa and India, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.
“Our objective was not to find a preference for different cultures’ music.
We used cultural music from Africa, India and Japan to pinpoint specific acoustic properties,” said study coauthor Frans de Waal, PhD, of Emory University.
“Past research has focused only on Western music and has not addressed the very different acoustic features of non-Western music. While nonhuman primates have previously indicated a preference among music choices, they have consistently chosen silence over the types of music previously tested.”
Previous research has found that some nonhuman primates prefer slower tempos, but the current findings may be the first to show that they display a preference for particular rhythmic patterns, according to the study.
“Although Western music, such as pop, blues and classical, sound different to the casual listener, they all follow the same musical and acoustic patterns.
Therefore, by testing only different Western music, previous research has essentially replicated itself,” the authors wrote.
The study was published in APA’s Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Learning and Cognition.
When African and Indian music was played near their large outdoor enclosures, the chimps spent significantly more time in areas where they could best hear the music.
When Japanese music was played, they were more likely to be found in spots where it was more difficult or impossible to hear the music.
The African and Indian music in the experiment had extreme ratios of strong to weak beats, whereas the Japanese music had regular strong beats, which is also typical of Western music.
“Chimpanzees may perceive the strong, predictable rhythmic patterns as threatening, as chimpanzee dominance displays commonly incorporate repeated rhythmic sounds such as stomping, clapping and banging objects,” said de Waal.
Read more via Chimps like listening to music with a different beat — ScienceDaily.

The Who live at Monterey 1967.

BN-IZ091_061715_J_20150617172919The rock band The Who performs on stage at the Monterey Pop Festival on June 18, 1967, in Monterey, California.
The introduction as the band took the stage: “And this is a group that will completely destroy you in more way than one. This is The Who.” At the end of the set, they destroyed their instruments.
A flip of a coin reportedly determined that The Who would take the stage before Jimi Hendrix.
Then in an effort to one-up the Who, Jimi Hendrix lit his guitar on fire at the end of his own set.
Photo: Paul Ryan/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images
via #TBT: The Who Plays a Destructive Set at Monterey Pop Festival 1967 – Photo Journal – WSJ.