‘Strawberry Fields Forever’ by John Lennon, 1967.

February, 1967 saw the release of ‘Strawberry Fields Forever’, John Lennon’s ode to his childhood haven Liverpool’s Strawberry Field children’s home and its grounds held special memories for John Lennon.
It inspired one of his greatest achievements, an effects-laden paean to his childhood haven drenched in hallucinogenic overdubs and owing much to the genius of George Martin.
Originally cited for inclusion on Sgt Pepper but instead released as a double A-side single along with Paul McCartney’s equally brilliant and nostalgic “Penny Lane”, “Strawberry Fields Forever” was pop music presented as art, a quantum leap in the group’s development, and a record that set the standard and style for the year to come.
Source: 12 essential songs that defined 1967 | The Independent

Jimi Hendrix at Woodstock.1969.

tumblr_mc0e8wL3WR1rvix3eo1_500

No one had planned for half a million people.
The highways in the area literally became parking lots as people abandoned their cars in the middle of the street and just walked the final distance to the Woodstock Festival.
Traffic was so bad that the organizers had to hire helicopters to shuttle the performers from their hotels to the stage.
The Music Starts
Despite all the organizers’ troubles, the Woodstock Festival got started nearly on time.
On Friday evening, August 15, Richie Havens got up on stage and officially started the Festival. Sweetwater, Joan Baez, and other folk artists also played Friday night.
The music started up again shortly after noon on Saturday with Quill and continued non-stop until Sunday morning around 9 am.
The day of psychedelic bands continued with such musicians as Santana, Janis Joplin, Grateful Dead, and The Who, to name just a few.
130108-jimi-hendrix-somewhere
It was obvious to everyone that on Sunday, the Woodstock Festival was winding down.
Most of the crowd left throughout the day, leaving about 150,000 people on Sunday night.
When Jimi Hendrix, the last musician to play at Woodstock, finished his set early on Monday morning, the crowd was down to only 25,000.
Despite the 30-minute lines for water and at least hour-long wait to use a toilet, the Woodstock Festival was a huge success.
There were a lot of drugs, a lot of sex and nudity, and a lot of mud.

The Beatles in Paris, 1964.

Jean-Marie Périer was at the heart of the pop explosion of the 1960s, capturing homegrown stars such as Jacques Dutronc and Johnny Hallyday – along with The Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan and Miles Davis – for the French magazine Salut les Copains.

The Beatles, Paris, 1964
Périer left the magazine Salut les Copains in 1974, and largely gave up photography to pursue a career in filmmaking.
Source: Effortlessly cool: Jean-Marie Périer’s 1960s pop stars – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian

Aretha Franklin’s Amazing Career.

American soul singer Aretha Franklin, a star on the Atlantic record label, photographed in 1968. Image Credit: Express Newspapers / Getty
The legendary soul singer, pianist, and performer Aretha Franklin died on Thursday, surrounded by family and friends, at the age of 76.
The Queen of Soul will be remembered for countless songs and performances throughout her life.
Aretha Franklin was a Crusader  for the rights of black women and men in the USA.
Source: Photos: The Queen of Soul’s Amazing Career – The Atlantic

‘Auld Lang Syne’ by Robbie Burns, 1796.

robert_burnsThe most commonly sung song for English-speakers on New Year’s eve, “Auld Lang Syne” is an old Scottish song that was first published by the poet Robert Burns in the 1796 edition of the book, Scots Musical Museum.
Burns transcribed it (and made some refinements to the lyrics) after he heard it sung by an old man from the Ayrshire area of Scotland, Burns’s homeland.
It is often remarked that “Auld Lang Syne” is one of the most popular songs that nobody knows the lyrics to. “Auld Lang Syne” literally translates as “old long since” and means “times gone by.”
The song asks whether old friends and times will be forgotten and promises to remember people of the past with fondness, “For auld lang syne, we’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet.
“The lesser known verses continue this theme, lamenting how friends who once used to “run about the braes,/ And pou’d the gowans fine” (run about the hills and pulled up the daisies) and “paidl’d in the burn/Frae morning sun till dine” (paddled in the stream from morning to dusk) have become divided by time and distance—”seas between us braid hae roar’d” (broad seas have roared between us).
Yet there is always time for old friends to get together—if not in person then in memory—and “tak a right guid-willie waught” (a good-will drink).

guylombardi

But it was bandleader Guy Lombardo, and not Robert Burns, who popularized the song and turned it into a New Year’s tradition. Lombardo first heard “Auld Lang Syne” in his hometown of London, Ontario, where it was sung by Scottish immigrants.
When he and his brothers formed the famous dance band, Guy Lombardo and His Royal Canadians, the song became one of their standards. Lombardo played the song at midnight at a New Year’s eve party at the Roosevelt Hotel in New York City in 1929, and a tradition was born.
Source: New Year’s Traditions