Singin’ in the Rain, 1952.

Produced and Distributed by Metro Goldwyn Mayer (USA).
The most beloved of all screen musicals is also the most scholarly – a mock film-historical piece about the travails of a silent cinema star, Don Lockwood (Gene Kelly), struggling to make the transition into the talkies.
Some of the film’s choicest humour is, a little cruelly, at the expense of lofty diva Lina Lamont (Jean Hagen, who is priceless), Lockwood’s co-star in the preposterous The Duelling Cavalier, whose aura is destroyed by her Noo Yawk accent (“I cyan’t stan’im!”).
Gene Kelly and Stanley Donen’s classic, and the industry crisis it depicted, were paid due homage in Michel Hazanavicius’s brilliantly tricksy silent pastiche The Artist (2011).
via The 10 best films about films | Film | The Guardian

Neil Young through the Years by Bernstein and Clinch.

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For the first time, the Morrison Hotel Gallery is hosting an exhibition in all three of their locations – Long May You Run, a retrospective of Neil Young, charts his rise from Buffalo Springfield to refusing to settle down in his 70s.

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See more on Neil Young via Neil Young: an artist through the years – in pictures | Music | The Guardian

The Who at Monterey, California 1967.

BN-IZ091_061715_J_20150617172919The rock band The Who performs on stage at the Monterey Pop Festival on June 18, 1967, in Monterey, California.
The introduction as the band took the stage: “And this is a group that will completely destroy you in more way than one. This is The Who.” At the end of the set, they destroyed their instruments.
A flip of a coin reportedly determined that The Who would take the stage before Jimi Hendrix.
Then in an effort to one-up the Who, Jimi Hendrix lit his guitar on fire at the end of his own set.
Photo: Paul Ryan/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images
via #TBT: The Who Plays a Destructive Set at Monterey Pop Festival 1967 – Photo Journal – WSJ.

The Select-O-Matic Jukebox ,1948.

Myron Holbert, shown with the Seeburg Selec-O-Matic "200" library demonstrated for the first time in Los Angeles, April 2, 1948. It stores and automatically plays 200 selections which are accomplished by merely setting a lever to play either side or both sides of any record in the whole library and the whole library can be played without anyone touching the records. A revolutionary development is the playing of both sides of the record without turning it over. (AP Photo)

Myron Holbert, shown with the Seeburg Select-O-Matic “200” library demonstrated for the first time in Los Angeles, April 2, 1948. It stores and automatically plays 200 selections which are accomplished by merely setting a lever to play either side or both sides of any record in the whole library and the whole library can be played without anyone touching the records. A revolutionary development is the playing of both sides of the record without turning it over. (AP Photo)

In this photo from April of 1948 we see engineer Myron Holbert, who’s showing off the Seeburg Select-O-Matic jukebox.
The machine held a relatively enormous library of music — 200 selections!
And although the jukebox became a symbol of the postwar teen music explosion, it predates the 1950s.
In fact, it was during the 1930s that America saw an incredible rise in the number of jukeboxes filling dance halls and diners.
Source: This Was a Jukebox in 1948

E A Presley’s Army Days, 1958-1960.

26 March 1958, Fort Chaffee, Arkansas:
Private Elvis Presley contemplates his next two years of army service while awaiting issue of more clothing.
Presley was sent to Fort Hood, Texas, for eight weeks of basic training with the tough Second Armoured Division.
Image Credit: Photograph by Bettmann/Bettman Archive.

See more fantastic images of Elvis via Elvis Presley: a life in pictures, 40 years after his death | Music | The Guardian