The Rock City where Chronicles of Narnia was shot.

Pictured is he entrance to the rocky city of Adrspach situated in the Czech Republic. near the border with Poland. 

It was the site and region where the movie “The Chronicles of Narnia” was shot.
Image Credit: Photograph by My Natural Blog.
Source: My First Steps In Photography In The Rocky City Of Narnia | Bored Panda

‘The Strange Colour of Your Body’s Tears.’

A great majority of movie posters are uninspiring. You know it’s true. They are, by and large, utterly routine and photoshopped affairs with little more to say than “Come and see this new film!”
They all look the same too.
However, a few lucky ones break away from the unadventurous monotony and stand in their own right as pieces of graphic art worthy of a place on any cinephiles’ bedroom or office wall.
Some of them are actually released and others exist as “alternatives” that, thanks to the wonders of the Internet, we can still get to view and admire.
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The Strange Colour of Your Body’s Tears
The clear inspiration is the Art Nouveau movement and its crazed and dreamy association with Absinthe, probably the most famous drink associated with La Belle Époque.
However, “The Strange Colour of Your Body’s Tears” (2013) is a neo-giallo and the art noveau grandeur also cleverly references the famed work of Dario Argento, the Italian maestro behind “Suspiria” (1977) and “Inferno” (1980) as well as classic giallo tropes.
This is a very beautiful piece of artwork that captures the allure and shattering surrealism of the movie.
See more images via 5 Brilliant Modern Movie Posters › Illusion.

The Wild Bunch, 1969

The Wild Bunch is a 1969 American epic revisionist Western film directed by Sam Peckinpah and starring William Holden, Robert Ryan, Ernest Borgnine, Edmond O’Brien, Ben Johnson and Warren Oates.
The plot concerns an aging outlaw gang on the Mexico–United States border trying to adapt to the changing modern world of 1913.
The film was controversial because of its graphic violence and its portrayal of crude men attempting to survive by any available means.
The screenplay was co-written by Peckinpah, Walon Green, and Roy N. Sickner.
The Wild Bunch was filmed in Technicolor and Panavision.
LocationMexico, notably at the Hacienda Ciénaga del Carmen, deep in the desert between Torreón and Saltillo, Coahuila, and on the Rio Nazas.
The Wild Bunch is noted for intricate, multi-angle, quick-cut editing using normal and slow motion images, a revolutionary cinema technique in 1969.
The writing of Green, Peckinpah, and Roy N. Sickner was nominated for a best screenplay Oscar, and the music by Jerry Fielding was nominated for Best Original Score.

Additionally, Peckinpah was nominated for an Outstanding Directorial Achievement award by the Directors Guild of America, and cinematographer Lucien Ballard won the National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Cinematography.
In 1999, the U.S. National Film Registry selected The Wild Bunch for preservation in the Library of Congress as culturally, historically, and aesthetically significant.
via  Wikipedia

The Shire of ‘Hobbiton’.

BAhbCVsHOgZmSSJIdXBsb2Fkcy9wbGFjZV9pbWFnZXMvY2Q2ZDllMDhlMzYxODk4YjliXzgyODI3ODYzOTZfODI1ODQyY2JiZF9iLmpwZwY6BkVUWwg6BnA6CnRodW1iSSIKOTgweD4GOwZUWwc7BzoKc3RyaXBbCTsHOgxjb252ZXJ0SSIQLXF1YWxpdHkgOTEGOwZUMAEven before it was retrofitted with several Hobbit Holes to play the part of Hobbiton in Peter Jackson’s adaptations of the classic Tolkien book series, this sheep farm seemed like a perfect stand-in for the famous fictional “Shire,” home of hobbits everywhere.
Indeed, its natural likeness is undoubtedly the reason Jackson and his producers chose the location – with the only other qualification being that it’s located in New Zealand, unofficial real-life location of Tolkien’s Middle Earth.
The farm is still an active sheep farm, but visitors can tour the area used for the set.
Most of the Hobbit Holes are fenced off and you can’t enter them, but one is specifically designed for visitors to enter and explore. Tour guides are employed to explain where in the movies each area appears – Bag End is a highlight, along with The Green Dragon, a whimsical old-world pub.
In fact, The Green Dragon is now open for business and at the end of the tour you can have a drink there.
The set is very detailed and the hobbit holes are purposely made to look as though they have been there for years, complete with details like fake moss and many other small touches.
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The tree at Bag End is a fake tree intended to preserve the area’s appearance as it was in the film, even though the one featured in The Lord of the Rings was real.
The film version was actually cut down and placed there for the movie.
It died by the time they decided to film The Hobbit, so a fake tree with hand-painted leaves sits in its place, an exact replica of the original.
The gorgeous location makes it easy to see why this was chosen for The Shire.

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The farm is in the middle of the countryside, still seemingly hidden from the modern world.
A GPS is helpful in locating it, since there aren’t really any signs directing you where to go.
via Hobbiton | Atlas Obscura.

Greer Garson, a Popular female Actor during WWII.

Born 1904 in Manor Park, East Ham, British-American actress Greer Garson was popular during the Second World War, being listed by the Motion Picture Herald as one of America’s top-ten box office draws from 1942 to 1946.
Unlike most young actresses beginning their careers in Hollywood, Garson was already in her mid-thirties when she made her first film.
Her elegant and intelligent demeanor struck a cord with the movie going public and her popularity soared at MGM.

A major star at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer during the 1940s, Garson possessed a beautiful speaking voice and her refined acting style earned her seven Academy Award nominations, including a record-tying five consecutive nominations for acting and all in the Best Actress category (1941–1945), winning the award for Mrs. Miniver (1942).
Garson had her final role for television was in a 1982 episode of The Love Boat.
She received an honorary Doctor of Arts degree from Southern Methodist University in Dallas, her late husband’s alma mater, in 1991.
In 1993, Queen Elizabeth II recognised Garson’s achievements by investing her as Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE).
In her final years, Garson occupied a penthouse suite at the Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas.
She died there from heart failure in 1996 at the age of 91.
Source: Greer Garson: One of the Most Popular Actresses During WWII ~ vintage everyday

Jean Harlow, ‘The Blonde Bombshell’.

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Jean Harlow, the “Blonde bombshell” (1911-1937) is often used to describe an exciting, dynamic, sexy woman with blonde hair, particularly blonde celebrity sex symbols.
The expression seems to have come from, or at least was popularized by, a movie and originally referred to a specific blonde bombshell.
In 1933, the platinum blonde Jean Harlow was one of the most popular actresses in Hollywood.
That year, Harlow starred in a movie called Bombshell (at the time “bombshell” in American slang was already being used to refer to incredibly attractive, flamboyant women, with the first documented case of this in 1860).

One of the advertising lines for the film was “Lovely, luscious, exotic Jean Harlow as the Blonde Bombshell of filmdom.”

When the film was released in England, they even renamed it “Blonde Bombshell” as it was thought in England that the original title sounded like a war film, which the movie is decidedly not. (It’s actually about an actress who gets fed up with being a sex symbol and just wants to lead a normal life).
While it seems probable that this wasn’t the first time someone out there uttered the words “blonde bombshell” (those two words fitting together so nicely), this does appear to be the first documented instance of it with, of course, the first actress to be labeled such being the lovely Jean Harlow, who incidentally died at the tender age of 26.
via Today I Learned.