The ‘Island of the Dolls’.

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The eyes of decapitated dolls blink lazily from their perches in the trees on Mexico’s Isla de las Munecas – ‘Island of the Dolls.’
There’s something undeniably terrifying about seeing what look like naked infants – sometimes remarkably realistic – clinging to the branches or dangling from their necks.
Legend has it that after a little girl drowned in Teshuilo Lake, and island resident Don Julian Santana began collecting dolls and installing them in the trees.
Eventually, their numbers grew into the hundreds.
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Don Julian Santana often sourced the dolls from the trash or traded produce for them, taking them in any condition, no matter how dirty or worn.
While many people viewed the doll-infested island as something out of a nightmare, to him it was a shrine.
Tragically, in 2001, Santana was discovered drowned in the same area of the lake where he believed the little girl had perished.
via Forbidden Islands: 7 Abandoned & Isolated World Wonders | Urbanist.

Solar Portrait in Love.

Solar Portrait in Love. Finalist, People.
Faustina Flores Carranza (66), and her husband, Juan Astudillo Jesus (63), sit in their solar-lit home in San Luis Acatlán, Guerrero, Mexico.
Faustina and Juan have seven children and have been together for 48 years.
Like many members of the Mixteca indigenous community, they have never had access to electricity.
When asked how having solar light has affected their life, Faustina said, “For the first time, we are able to look at each other in the eyes in our moments of intimacy.”
Image Credit: Photograph by Ruben Escudero. All rights reserved.
Source: Finalists From Smithsonian Magazine’s 2018 Photo Contest – The Atlantic

The Xoloitzcuintli, relative of an ancient Aztec dog.

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Image Credit: Photograph by Yann Arthus-Bertrand/Corbis.
Mexico’s main national animal is the golden eagle—the bird that legend says played a role in the founding of Mexico City and appears on the country’s flag.
But the country didn’t stop there: it also selected a national mammal (jaguar), a national arthropod (grasshopper), a national marine mammal (vaquita) and a national dog, (xoloitzcuintli).
Commonly called a Mexican hairless, the xoloitzcuintli (pronounced “show-low-itz-quint-lee”) descends from an ancient species native to Central America that was prized by the Aztecs, who believed the canine to have healing abilities.
via Ten Unusual National Animals That Rival the Unicorn | Science | Smithsonian.

Mythical Mural Art by Curiot.

1384499184_1-640x480Mexican street artist Favio Martinez, better known as Curiot, is famous for his mixing of humans and animals in his works, creating some new forms of living beings.
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In his illustrations there are present many folklore elements of the Mexican people, which have roots in Native American folklore.
Favio Marinex was born and raised in the United States, but ten years ago, returned to his ethnic homeland.
He lives and works in Mexico City now.
via Mythical Street Art by Curiot | Weezbo Inspiration.

1st New World Medical Book published Mexico City, 1570.

by Michael J. North
Just over thirty years after the first printing press arrived in the New World from Spain, the first medical book was printed in Mexico City: Francisco Bravo’s Opera Medicinalia, published by Pedro Ocharte in 1570.
While it is well within NLM’s mission to collect, preserve and give the world access to such a book, there is only one known copy of it, housed in La Biblioteca José María Lafragua at the Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla in Mexico and we are all extremely fortunate that this sole copy has been digitized by the Primeros Libros project.
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Decorative title page with Latin text presented with classical architectural features, dated 1549. Photography: Iván Pérez Pineda
The National Library of Medicine does have a copy of the text, however, in the form of a photostatic copy made in 1944.
Long before the age of digitization, the only ways to make rare texts available at other libraries were by copying them by hand, reprinting them, microfilming, or making photocopies, all of which are extremely time-consuming and expensive for entire books.
This copy was made from a photostatic copy at the Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens, which in turn was made from a photostatic copy at the New York Public Library.
The copy in New York is described as a “facsimile reproduction of the original at the Library at the Universidad de Puebla, Mexico” where the only original copy is held.
via The First Medical Book Printed in the New World | Circulating Now.