“Out of the Blue.”

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British underwater photographer of the year – winner.
Out of the Blue
Image Credit: Photograph by by Nick Blake (UK).
Location: Yukatán peninsula.
Kukulkan is one of the spectacular cenotes (underwater sinkholes) on Mexico’s Yucatán peninsula, and is noted for its otherworldy light as sunbeams penetrate the darkness of the cave.
Blake captured this diver in the centre of one of the beams.
See more great images via Underwater photographer of the year 2017 winners – in pictures | Environment | The Guardian

“Magical Lake Camecuaro.”

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“Hundreds of old cypresses guard the perimeter of Lake Camécuaro and its turquoise-colored, crystal clear water,”
Javier Eduardo Alvarez writes of this photo he made of the small Mexican lake, popular for its picturesque beauty.
“This place is magical.”
Photograph by Javier Eduardo Alvarez, National Geographic Your Shot
Source: Trees and Lake Image, Mexico | National Geographic Photo of the Day

“The Ancient City of Teotihuacan.”

xPanorámica de Teotihuacan (image via José Luis Ruiz / Flickr)
Archaeologists may be a bit closer to solving one of the greatest ancient Mesoamerican mysteries:
Who ruled the ancient city of Teotihuacán, and where are they buried?
Small remote-controlled robots have led the team excavating the ruins to a cache of around 50,000 objects — from intricately carved sculptures to obsidian blades to jewelry — in a tunnel underneath the Temple of the Feathered Serpent that is now believed to lead to the royal tombs.x2
One of the feathered serpent heads that decorated the Temple of the Feathered Serpent (image via Jami Dwyer / Wikimedia)
Although Teotihuacán was once one of the largest cities in the world, with an estimated 125,000 residents at its peak, little is known about it.
It was established around 100 BCE and is believed to have lasted until the 7th century CE, when it was abandoned.
The city was an industrial hub and achieved great wealth as a center for the obsidian trade, and the ruins now cover 32 square miles of temples, pyramids, and residences.
It is not known what the city was called by those who built and lived in it; the Aztecs gave it the name Teotihuacán, which means something like “The Place Where Men Become Gods.”
via Atlas Obscura.

 

“Island of the Dolls”.

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The eyes of decapitated dolls blink lazily from their perches in the trees on Mexico’s Isla de las Munecas – ‘Island of the Dolls.’
There’s something undeniably terrifying about seeing what look like naked infants – sometimes remarkably realistic – clinging to the branches or dangling from their necks.
Legend has it that after a little girl drowned in Teshuilo Lake, island resident Don Julian Santana began collecting dolls and installing them in the trees.
Eventually, their numbers grew into the hundreds.
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Santana often sourced the dolls from the trash or traded produce for them, taking them in any condition, no matter how dirty or worn.
While many people viewed the doll-infested island as something out of a nightmare, to him it was a shrine.
Tragically, in 2001, Santana was discovered drowned in the same area of the lake where he believed the little girl had perished.
via Forbidden Islands: 7 Abandoned & Isolated World Wonders | Urbanist.

“Zapata”.

zapata-2Born August 8, 1879, in Anenecuilco, Morelos.
Zapata was a mediero (sharecropper) and horse trainer.
Conscripted into the army for seven years attaining the rank of sergeant.
As president of the village council, he campaigned for the restoration of village lands confiscated by hacendados. (Above: The Zapata Brothers).
His slogan was “Tierra y Libertad.” Zapata sided with Madero.
Between 1910 and 1919, Zapata who was loved by his people continued his fight for land and liberty for the poor of Mexico, rebelling against anyone who interfered with his Plan of Ayala which called for the seizure of all foreign owned land, all land taken from villages, confiscation of one-third of all land held by “friendly” hacendados and full confiscation of land owned by persons opposed to the Plan of Ayala.
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On April 10, 1919, Zapata was tricked into a meeting with one of Carranza’s generals who wanted to “switch sides.” The meeting was a trap, and Zapata was ambushed and killed as he arrived at the meeting.
(Above: The Zapatas and their wives).
via Emiliano Zapata 1879-1919 : Mexico History.

“Old Guard.”

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“Hundreds of old cypresses guard the perimeter of Lake Camécuaro and its turquoise-colored, crystal clear water,” Javier Eduardo Alvarez writes of this photo he made of the small Mexican lake, popular for its picturesque beauty.
“This place is magical.”This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo assignments, get expert feedback, be published, and more.
Photograph by Javier Eduardo Alvarez, National Geographic Your Shot
Source: Trees and Lake Image, Mexico | National Geographic Photo of the Day