The ‘Vinegar’ King James Bible (1717).

Vinegar

The Holy Bible as printed in Oxford in 1717 by John Baskett became known as the ‘Vinegar Bible’ on account of the celebrated misprint in the Parable of the Vineyard. Rel.bb.71.2
No authoritative copy of the King James Bible survives.
The manuscript, supposedly still in existence in 1655, is said to have perished in the Great Fire of London.
The first editions were produced by the King’s Printer, Robert Barker, who despite his eminent position seems to have been a disorganised workman who introduced a large number of typographical errors.
The first Cambridge edition of 1629 carefully revised the text, but Barker excelled himself in 1631 with the notorious ‘Wicked Bible’ which omitted the word ‘not’ from the Seventh Commandment.
The translation itself was not universally admired either, the Puritan scholar Hugh Broughton damning it as soon as it appeared, and a later writer producing an 800 page volume on errors in the Pentateuch alone.
Nonetheless, assisted by the monopoly of the King’s Printer, the new translation rapidly supplanted the Bishops’ Bible and, more slowly, the Geneva version.
Plans for another rendering in the Commonwealth period came to nothing, and the King James version, dubbed the Authorised Version although no record survives of it ever having been authorised, reigned unchallenged until the 1880s.
Lectern
via Great and Manifold Blessings: The Making of the King James Bible.

The Letterpress Machine Room at Netley.

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From Right to Left: Norm Hodson, John (Sgt. Carter) Cresswell, Grant Hofmeyer (with beard) on Heidelberg 4; Ray Belt on KSB, John Cowell  and Ian (Luwigi)  Russell on KSB.
On 10 x 15 Heidelberg Platens over by the sink are: Bob Cooper in light coloured shirt and George Palmer in Overalls.
Laurie Hussin is on a Vertical Miehle behind them and I think way over in the back is ‘Farmer’ John Fletcher.
Note the pieces of dirty and stinking rubber (Cut up conveyor belt) placed at the machine delivery.
These rubber mats were procured from a fertiliser company by Frank Johnson to protect our wonderful parquet floor from the rough bastards who kept on dropping their letterpress printing formes on the floor.
The parquet floor was totally impractical for a Machine Room and soon started breaking up.
In the words of Brian James, Government Printer, “this is the largest parquet floor in the Southern Hemisphere”.
YEAH! So what…OK for a Ballroom but hopeless for a heavy work area.
Caxton 1947.

Solar Printing Press.

Screen shot 2011-01-23 at 2Photo: Printing press driven by the heat rays of the sun.
On  6 August 1882, Monsieur Abel Pifre, a French Engineer, demonstrated the solar engine invented by him at a meeting of the Union Francaise de la Jeunesse held at the Jardin des Tuileries in Paris.
It consisted of a concave mirror 3.5 metres in diameter, in the focus of which there is placed a cylindrical steam boiler equipped with a safety valve.
The steam generated by the reflected sun-rays actuates a small vertical engine of 2/5 horse power driving a Marioni type printing-press.
Although the sun lacked power and the sky was frequently overcast, the press operated continuously from 1.00 pm to 5.30 pm turning out an average of five hundred copies per hour of a journal which was especially made up for the occasion and appropriately called Soleil-Journal.
Previously Pifre had demonstrated that 50 litres of water could be brought to boil in less than 50 minutes, after which the pressure of the steam increased 1 atmosphere every eight minutes.
There is little doubt that such a solar engine will be a boon to the population of hot areas which so often suffer from a shortage of fuel.
via Metal Type – Solar Powered Printing Press.

Historic Olivewood Estate at Renmark, 1889.

IN THE semi-arid Riverland area along the Murray River, there’s a grand old Canadian log cabin that is an oddity of the landscape.
And behind the log cabin there is an American-inspired barn from 1890, full of antique citrus processing machines.
If only the walls of these buildings could talk, they would tell a tale of early settlement like no other.
This is Olivewood Estate in Renmark, South Australia, built in 1889 by one of the three Canadian Chaffey brothers, who were brought out from the US to establish Renmark — and Mildura — as the first irrigation settlements in Australia.
William, George and Charles Chaffey were Canadian-born, and were working in California on irrigation projects when the Victorian and South Australian governments approached them to set up settlements here.
”What followed were several tough years to attract new settlers and establish the pumps, channels and infrastructure for irrigation, with Mildura and Renmark taking different paths to settlement”.
While the towns today are the result of this settler work, Olivewood Estate is a more personal reminder of the Chaffey brothers’ impact on the landscape.
Charles, who established Olivewood, chose a Canadian-style log cabin and US-style barn, on an original 60ha property, which is today 12ha.
Since the National Trust took over management of the building in 1979, volunteers have worked to attract visitors and keep the property viable.
Alongside the homestead, the barn is filled with machines donated from local citrus farms such as a 1910 stemmer and grader.
Next to the barn is a reproduction olive crushing mill and oil house, again full of donated items such as photos, a wedding dress, and a large display of dental equipment.
At the front of Olivewood the Charles Chaffey Centre showcases Renmark’s history.

It is four museums in one, including a Printing Museum dedicated to the old days of hot metal composition and letterpress printing production.
The Images that follow include some taken by Old Guv letterpress printer Bob Downs from his recent trip to Renmark and Olivewood. Thanks Bob.

 

Source: Historic Olivewood at Renmark is remarkable for its architecture and horticulture | The Weekly Times

Battle of the Somme telegram Discovered in Print workshop.

The telegram was discovered by Peter Plowman — a volunteer with the local Peterborough History Group.
Mr Plowman spent his working life in printing businesses and did not know why telegram was kept.

PHOTO: Peter Plowman found the telegram while cleaning the Peterborough printing shop. (ABC News: Patrick Martin)
The unlikely find had special significance for the printing buff.
“I had a grandfather that fought at Somme for England, so the telegram has a significance for me as well as the print shop and the local community,” Mr Plowman said.
Lieutenant Colonel David Edmonds unveiled the carefully restored telegram at a public ceremony at Peterborough. Lt. Colonel  Edmonds said the find had significance for the whole region.
“Our information is that the local regiment was the 9th Australian Light Horse Regiment — they formed the 9th Light Horse [Regiment] in the First World War — it was the second light horse regiment to be raised here in South Australia,” Lt Colonel Edmonds said.
“All through the mid north of South Australia, from Peterborough to Port Pirie, Port Augusta all the way down to Kadina and Clare, the 9th Light Horse Regiment drew its soldiers who went away in the First World War.”
“It’s a very important piece of local history and Australian history, too.”
He said it was an honour to unveil the telegram as a former commander of the 3rd/9th Light Horse Regiment, which still existed in Adelaide.
He said the battle — which left more than one million dead and wounded across all sides — represented the last German offensive of the war.
PHOTO: Lieutenant Colonel David Edmonds stands beside the 100-year-old telegram. (ABC News: Patrick Martin)
“The telegram shows that the Germans were still well and truly on the front foot.”
“It was shortly thereafter that the war turned in the Allies’ favour.”
He said the war impacted communities throughout Australia “for decades after the war”.
via Battle of the Somme telegram discovered in workshop a century after it was sent – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

The Wharfedale Printing Press.

wharfedale-1024x526The Wharfedale is one of a spe­cial fam­ily of presses-the ‘stop cyl­in­der’ presses.
The forme moves back­wards and for­wards on a flat-bed, and the impres­sion is made by a rotat­ing cyl­in­der.
Paper is gripped on the cyl­in­der. In com­mon with proof­ing presses, the force of the impres­sion is delivered in a thin strip (just where the cyl­in­der hits the forme). This allows for a greater pre­ci­sion of impression.
The press has a long his­tory: in 1830 Wil­liam Dawson, a joiner from Otley in West York­shire, made a ‘rul­ing machine’ from wood. This expos­ure to print­ers led to more work sup­ply­ing print­ers.
Across the UK in Ulver­ston, Stephen Soulby pat­en­ted a print­ing machine where the cyl­in­der rolled over a sta­tion­ary forme. He called the press the ‘Ulver­sto­nian’ but had little suc­cess with it and was poin­ted in the dir­ec­tion of Dawson in Otley. I assume Dawson developed Soulby’s ideas with him.
In 1855 the first machine was sent from Otley-on the banks of the river Wharfe — at a cost of £60 and was cap­able of pro­du­cing 500 impres­sions per hour. At that time twenty men were employed in this work.
By 1911 between two and three thou­sand men were engaged in build­ing this type of press along the Wharfe at dif­fer­ent works: Dawsons, Payne, Folds and so on.
Wharfedales were able to deliver between two and three thou­sand impres­sions per hour.
via Wharfedale | British Letterpress.