‘What’s having a Barbie mean?’

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Above: A very fine example of a hardworking Aussie BBQ, somewhere in the donga I would suspect.
The word “barbecue” comes from the Caribbean word “barbacoa.” Originally, a barbacoa wasn’t a way of cooking food, but the name of a wooden structure used by Taino Indians to smoke their food. It’s likely that the first barbecue consisted of some sort of fish, creatures from the sea obviously being plentiful in the Caribbean.
Besides used for cooking, the structure of sticks could also be used as an area for sleeping, storage, and shelter.
Spanish explorers took the word barbacoa back to Spain, where it appeared in print for the first time in 1526. For a while, barbacoa still referred to the structure that food was cooked in, but after a while people started using it to refer to the process of cooking food.
The first known instance of barbecue appearing in English print was in A New Voyage Round the World by Englishman, Captain William Dampier, (who landed in what is now known as Western Australia) in the 17th Century.
By 1733, “barbecue” had started to mean a social gathering during which meat was grilled, as evidenced in B. Lynde’s diary that year: “Fair and hot; Browne, barbacue; hack overset.”
About two decades later, in 1755, the word “barbecue” was entered into Samuel Johnson’s The Dictionary of the English Language.
The entry reads:
“to ba’rbecue. A term used in the West-Indies for dressing a hog whole; which, being split to the backbone, is laid flat upon a large gridiron, raised about two foot above a charcoal fire, with which it is surrounded”.
Today, there are just as many spellings for barbecue as there are meanings for the term. Many people use barbeque, BBQ, Bar-B-Que, and other variations thereof. That said, the “official” spelling is generally considered to be “barbecue” with a “c”, similar to the original.
While people may debate over what should be the correct spelling or what exactly constitutes barbecue, there is one thing we can all agree on: a barbecue is definitely no longer a shelter or a sleeping structure!
derwombat
 

‘The Clang Out.’

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Hot Metal Comps. had a unique way of saying goodbye to a workmate who was retiring from the trade.
There was a hell of a lot of racket in the Comp Room when it happened!
The journeyman Comps. and their Apprentices would scatter everywhere grabbing small chases, metal galleys, quoin keys, furniture or anything remotely metal and line up around the work “stone” or “stones” and wait.
Wait for what, you may ask? Yes, it was for some poor old bastard who was retiring.
The noise was deafening as the blokes went ballistic by banging away with their chases and galleys at a furious rate.
 It was bloody wonderful fun and a fitting tribute to the comp for his years of slaving away with lead type and ink.
Gradually with the advent of new technology the clang-out slowly subsided.
There wasn’t much fun in trying to slap two paper bromides together.
It was a bloody sad time! The trade was changing as the new technology swept over us!
derwombat

Learn the Aussie Lingo: ‘gday Mate!’

GDay-MateFor Overseas visitors preparing to come to Oz, here are some Aussie expressions that you can learn  and use to impress your friends with.
Strine is an abbreviation of Stralian, which is the shortened form of Australian.
And now some Strine words for you to learn:
“Mate”Friend, cobber. Can be used anywhere in a sentence, but never to be used in anger.
“Gudday”Hello, Good Morning, How are you? (Compulsory expression).
“Oooroo” – Goodbye, see ya!
“Dad and Dave – Having a Shave of your face.
“Tom Tit” – having a Shit, Crap or a Poo.
“Bag of Fruit” – A nice Suit of clothes to wear
“Dickhead – Dickhead (universal word for dickhead).
“Bludger” – Lazy person who lives off other people and is a Low Bastard.
“to and from” – Pom, English person. Ten pound tourist (expression now outdated).
“septic tank” – Citizen of the United States. (possible wartime expression).
“Pissed” – Drunk, inebriated, sloshed, under the weather.
“Dobber” – Person who runs to the Boss and dobs on mates, a Low life and boss’s man.
“Ow they hanging” – Enquiry about the state of your testicles or life in general.
“Long Drop” – country shithouse, deep hole in the ground where Newspaper substitutes for toilet paper.
“Blowies” – blowflies, large carnivorous Aussie flies. Blowies congregate around long drops, and human bums.
derwombat

Georg Trakl, Poet and Addict, 1887-1914.

15585838855_7455135728_bGeorg Trakl, poet in 1910.
He doesn’t know whether his behaviour was unusual, he didn’t drink but took large amounts of cocaine.
This remark is taken from the medical file of Georg Trakl and is part of a brief account of the poet’s movements and behaviour in the month or so preceding his committal for observation to a psychiatric hospital in Kraków in early October 1914.
Just six weeks earlier, towards the end of August, the 27-year-old Trakl had undertaken the 1000-kilometre train journey from Innsbruck, at the western end of the Habsburg Empire, to the far eastern crownland of Galicia, where he was to be deployed as a military pharmacist.
His frontline experience was brief but traumatic.
During the Battle of Grodek-Rawa Ruska, he was assigned sole care of ninety badly wounded soldiers sheltering in a barn, a task for which he had neither the training nor the equipment.
As he later recounted from his hospital bed in Kraków to his friend and publisher Ludwig von Ficker, when one of the wounded men had ended his own suffering by shooting himself in the head, Trakl had fled outside only to be confronted by the sight of local peasants hanging lifeless in the trees.
One evening during the westward retreat of the defeated Austro-Hungarian forces, he announced his own intention to shoot himself, but was forcefully disarmed by his comrades.
His committal followed on 6 October and he died in hospital on 3 November.
His medical file lists the cause of death, complete with exclamation mark, as “Suicid durch Cocainintoxication!”
Read more via Wild Heart Turning White: Georg Trakl and Cocaine | The Public Domain Review.

‘Treadleys’ (Pushbikes) in Australia.

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Pretty untidy lot we were.
Just put the old tredley (or “treadly“) anywhere along the kerb while we go in and watch some American B Grade Movie at the local cinema..
But we didn’t lock our bikes back then, did we?
We actually cared and looked out for each other.

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And some Aussies depended on their pushbike to pursue a livelihood like shearing.

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In Adelaide the Toffs had the opportunity to purchase a Three Speed Bike. Bloody Toffs.
These two pipe smoking chums admire the magnificent cycle.
But hang on is the bloke on the right attempting to urinate on his chum or his bike. We will never know.
Please Note; Everyone died  (eventually) after this ad was published.
derwombat

‘What Aussies call other Aussies.’

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Aussies love to nosh up at a barbie, have a coldie and take a gander at some footy, and tell you that everything is bonza.
They also love their slang.
A little-known fact, however, is that Aussies even have lingo for each other…
It was inevitable that the first Pommies in Australia developed a new vocabulary to describe their alien surroundings, given that everything in Australia was so different from all they had known.
Prison slang crept into general use, indigenous language was incorporated, and new words coined – much to the alarm of our colonial establishment.
The upper class pommies looked down their noses at the convicts and Australian-born folk.
Originally, they called them ‘Cornstalks’, because the new generation of Aussies were taller than their forebears.
The name stuck for awhile, and so did the custom of giving regional names to our fellow Aussies.
‘Sandgropers’, or Western Australians, once used the term ‘Wise Men from the East’ in reference to visitors from the Eastern side – especially the ones who enjoyed telling us how good they were.
Victoria was called the Cabbage Patch because of its small size, hence ‘Cabbage Patchers’ hailed from the garden state. ‘
Gum Sucker’ was formerly applied to all colonials for their pastime of sucking the sweet gum from some species of wattle.
How it came to refer solely to Victorians is a mystery.
Tasmanians, too, suffered prejudice, and ‘Taswegian’ was once used almost derisively to describe the mob who in kinder moments were called ‘Apple Islanders’.
Those Taswegians were once also known as ‘Barracoutas’, after the creature that supported fishing families and was a staple during the starvation years.
The name is rarely heard now, and the ’couta, too, have almost vanished.
‘Crow-eaters’ for South Australians is still commonly used, and refers to the piping shrike (not a crow) on the South Australian coat of arms.
‘Top Enders’ for those from the Northern Territory is heard quite often and is a pretty good description.
‘Banana Benders’, referring to those from Queensland describes them perfectly and is simply not heard enough.
As for the residents of the Australian Capital Territory, anything goes seeing most of them are pollies or bloody bludging public servants.
via Slang: What Aussies call other Aussies – Australian Geographic.