de Kehtam’s ‘Fasiculus Medicine’ first Anatomy Book with Illustrations.

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“For my part I deem those blessed to whom, by favour of the gods, it has been granted either to do what is worth writing of, or to write what is worth reading; above measure blessed those on whom both gifts have been conferred”–Pliny the Elder.
Johannes de Kehtam’s Fasciculus Medicine (printed in Venice in 1500) was the first anatomy book to be printed with illustrations.
Ketham was described as a German doctor living in Italy and may well have been Johann von Kerchheim, a German practising surgery and medicine in Venice during 1470), and who wrote a series of tracts on various aspects of medicine which were then collected into this single bound volume.
6a00d83542d51e69e2017ee57542ac970dThe illustrations are spectacular and to me have a very modern sensibility in their mid-Renaissance woodcut legacy–the look very clear and concise, are well proportioned, nicely labelled, and give plenty of free rein to open and blank spaces on the woodblock.
The only time these images really “fail” is when they appear in colour–a process that would’ve been undertaken privately, by the purchaser of the book, who would have contracted with an artisan to colo r the book.
The images in almost all of the cases of colouring that I have seen just do not match the elegance and brilliance of the original with no color.
Source for all images: NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE,
Read on further via JF Ptak Science Books: First Printed & Illustrated Medical Book (1500)

Fracastoro, the Syphilis Poet by Titian.

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Original Painting of Fracastoro by Titian.
A notorious 16th-century Italian’s portrait was acquired by the National Gallery in London in 1924.
His name? Girolamo Fracastoro. His claim to fame?
A word for the sexually transmitted disease that was terrifying his countrymen—syphilis—was derived from a poem he wrote.
The portrait was damaged, darkened by varnish, and unsigned, so the museum staff relegated it to a basement gallery despite Fracastoro’s renown.
Eventually, cleaning and conservation revealed the hand of a master artist.
After close examination, curators decided last year that the artist must be the famed Venetian painter known as Titian.
The portrait now hangs in one of the museum’s main galleries.
via Rediscovered Treasures

Light from Above, Santa Maddalena.

Light from Above.
The picture “Light from above” was taken in September 2016 in Santa Maddalena, Dolomiten, Italy.
Beautiful light and humidity stood behind the nice play of light and shadows that morning.
I was waiting as the small church was illuminated by the very first rays of Sun.
Image Credit: Photograph by Peter Svoboda, Slovakia National Award.
Source: The Winners Of 2017’s Sony World Photography Contest | Bored Panda

Fortinio Liceti’s Monsters, 1665.

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Highlights from the illustrations in the 1665 edition of Fortunio Liceti’s De Monstris, originally published, without the illustrations, in 1616.
Liceti’s work, although not the first on the topic of deformities in nature, was perhaps the most influential of the period.
In the wake of the book there was a huge rise in interest throughout Europe in “monstrosities”: pygmies, supposed mermaids, deformed fetuses, and other natural marvels were put on display and widely discussed, becoming the circus freak-shows of their time.
However, unlike many of his contemporaries Licenti did not see deformity as something negative, as the result of errors or failures in the course of nature.
Instead he likened nature to an artist who, faced with some imperfection in the materials to be shaped, ingeniously creates another form still more admirable.
‘It is said that I see the convergence of both Nature and art,’ wrote Liceti, ‘because one or the other not being able to make what they want, they at least make what they can.”
Read more via Fortunio Liceti’s Monsters (1665) | The Public Domain Review.

Dragonfly visits Milan’s ‘Library of Trees.’

Milan, Italy
A dragonfly perches on a pine branch at the ‘Library of Trees’ public park.
Transforming the grey city, began with the planting of seeds in September and by trees and plants in November 2017. There will be 450 trees from 19 species, 90,000 plants including hedges, shrubs and climbers.
The “Library of Trees” will be a 3,500m2 green space in the heart of Milan that is increasingly returning to nature.
The so called – vertical forest, aims to reduce pollution and to increase the biodiversity. The vertical forests concept has proven so popular that similar projects have been commissioned for Switzerland, Netherlands, and China.
Photograph: Luca Bruno/AP
Source: Pandas and pageantry: Tuesday’s top photos | News | The Guardian