Hedy Lamarr, the 1940s Movie Star with a beautiful mind.

After a brief early film career in Czechoslovakia, she fled from her husband, a wealthy Austrian ammunition manufacturer, and secretly moved to Paris.
There, she met Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studio head Louis B. Mayer, who offered her a movie contract in Hollywood, where she became a film star from the late 1930s to the 1950s.
Among Lamarr’s best known films are Algiers (1938), Boom Town (1940), I Take This Woman (1940), Comrade X (1940), Come Live With Me (1941), H.M. Pulham, Esq. (1941), and Samson and Delilah (1949).

Lamarr is also credited with being an inventor.
At the beginning of World War II, she and composer George Antheil developed a radio guidance system for Allied torpedoes, which used spread spectrum and frequency hopping technology to defeat the threat of jamming by the Axis powers.
Although the US Navy did not adopt the technology until the 1960s, the principles of their work are arguably incorporated into Bluetooth technology, and are similar to methods used in legacy versions of CDMA and Wi-Fi.
Lamarr was married six times, had two sons and a daughter.
She died in 2000 in Casselberry, Florida, of heart disease, aged 85.
via Hedy Lamarr: The 1940s Hollywood Beauty With Brilliant Mind ~ vintage everyday

The Bundy ‘Time Clock’ Brothers torn apart by their Clock.

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It was a disaster for the families.
But it started well. The inventor of an early version of the time clock was a jeweler, Willard Legrand Bundy of Auburn, New York.
His brother, Harlow Bundy, an entrepreneur, formed Bundy Manufacturing Company in 1889 to produce Willard’s time clock.
Their “workman’s time-recorder” captured on paper tape the arrival and departure times of employees. Businesses and factories across the country began using the recorder.
In 1900, Bundy Manufacturing merged with other companies to form international time recording, which later became IBM.
But the brothers, who worked together, had disagreements, starting with the firing of one of Willard’s sons.
Willard eventually left the company , too. His sons formed a rival time recording company using a new patent. Harlow’s company hammered them with lawsuits for years.
Family disputes aside, the value of the time clock was immediately obvious. It’s ability to accurately track workers’ hours helped workers, who had proof of time worked.
And managers received data more accurately and efficiently than from human time recorders.
via Two Brothers Time Clock | Orbital Shift.

The Flying Bum, Bedfordshire.

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Full of gas: The world’s longest aircraft – part airship, plane and helicopter – has been unveiled in Cardington, Bedfordshire.
It will be used for surveillance and aid missions… and resembles something very familiar. The 300ft-long ‘airship’ unveiled in Britain is the world’s longest aircraft.
Known as the HAV304, aircraft is being displayed at a Hangar in Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.
It is 302ft (91m) long making it 60ft (18m) longer than the biggest airliners.
long-aircraft
It can stay in the air for 3 weeks and will be vital to delivering humanitarian aid.
Its funders include Iron Maiden singer Bruce Dickinson.
The aircraft is 70 per cent more environmentally friendly than a cargo plane and doesn’t need a runway to take off.
via HAV304 300ft-long ‘airship’ unveiled in Britain is world’s longest aircraft | Mail Online.

Airship R33, Selby, England, 1919.

pervaya-mirovaya-vojna-3-24-990x718An observer in the tail tip of the English airship R33 on March 6, 1919 in Selby, England. (Bibliotheque nationale de France)
World War I was the first major conflict to see widespread use of powered aircraft — invented barely more than a decade before the fighting began.
Airplanes, along with kites, tethered balloons, and zeppelins gave all major armies a new tactical platform to observe and attack enemy forces from above.

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via vintage everyday.

The Giffard Dirigible, France 1852.

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The Giffard Dirigible, flying from Paris to Trappes, 1852.
In France, an engineer named Henri Giffard (1825-82) was leading the way in les ballons dirigeable, French for directable balloons, and from which English adapted the word dirigible.
In 1852, Giffard’s airship made the first recorded successful powered and steerable flight.
The intrepid inventor flew his machine from the Paris Hippodrome to Trappes, a distance of 17 miles (27 km), in roughly 3 hours. The craft proved manoeuvrable, making many navigational turns and performing circles, but the engine wasn’t powerful enough to fly against the wind and failed to make a return journey.
The balloon was 144 feet long (44 m), hydrogen filled, and highly flammable, so the engine exhaust was diverted downwards by a long pipe.
The engine produced 3 hp, drove a propeller, and top speed of the dirigible was 6 mph (9 km).
via Incredible Victorian Inventions & the Roots of Steampunk | Kate Tattersall Adventures.

The Champion Asbestos Gas Fire, 1884.

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Example of the World’s love affair with Asbestos, even in the 1880’s they knew of its harmful nature.
NAMPA — Chemistry professor Jerry Harris has a book in his office at Northwest Nazarene University called, “Asbestos: Silk of the Mineral Kingdom,” published in 1946.
He pulls it out when he needs a prime example of why his research on nanoparticles toxicity is important.
Asbestos is the infamous material that has cost billions of dollars to remove after it was used in millions of manufacturing projects throughout the 20th century.
But inhaling it for a long period of time has been shown to cause lung cancer and mesothelioma, among other sicknesses.
His project is one of six taking place at NNU under a $3.2 million, five-year grant from the IdeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence Program, or INBRE — a grant that was just renewed at the beginning of this month.
Harris’ research centers on what can happen when a material is broken down into smaller and smaller particles, or nanoparticles.
As a substance is compressed, it can change shape and color, sometimes changing its biological factors.
“So as (researchers) are starting to look at these nanomaterials, they’re trying to avoid something like asbestos from happening again,” Harris said.
Continue on from the Idaho Press Tribune.