The Remarkable Dragonfly.

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The sight of a dragonfly is one of the more remarkable that nature has to offer.
The Ark In Space, with the help of some astounding macrophotography, takes a look at the life cycle of the dragonfly as well as its remarkable and unusual physiology.
Image Credit: Photograph by MrClean1982
via Dragonfly Delight – Amazing Macrophotography ~ Kuriositas.

Where are all the Christmas beetles?

Do you remember when hordes of large, brightly coloured scarab beetles used to descend on Aussie summertime gatherings like mobile festive decorations?
by John Pickrell
Image credit: Stuart_Cox/Shutterstock
Christmas beetles were said to be so numerous 100 years ago in the Sydney region that they could be found floating in the harbour in huge numbers at this time of year.
These iridescent insects were known to swarm in such quantities that the boughs of eucalypt trees would regularly bend under their weight.
Once common in summertime – particularly at night around streetlights or as visitors at barbecues in eastern Australia – these large and often colourful scarab beetles comprise 36 different species, nearly all of which are endemic to Australia. They’re all in the genus Anoplognathus, with the common names of some species including king, queen, and campfire beetle, washerwoman and furry tailed prince.
But you may have noticed that they are less common than they used to be, with these metallic pink, brown, green and gold insects likely to be experiencing similar declines in numbers that are blighting other insects worldwide, particularly in urban areas. According to Australian Museum experts, the evidence for declines in New South Wales is anecdotal but compelling.
Perhaps unsurprisingly, increasing human population numbers and habitat loss are implicated as the most likely causes for declines.
Sydney’s human population grew from just over 4 million in 2011 to more than 5 million in 2018.
Meanwhile, Cumberland Plain woodland in Western Sydney – once rich with eucalypts that adult Christmas beetles feed on – now covers less than 10 per cent of its original area.
Climate change is likely to be another factor in declines, experts say. Christmas beetle larvae usually pupate into adults from about November or December and the adult stage only lives for a few weeks, during which time they must mate and lay eggs. Unusually dry spring weather can delay development of pupae into adults until the following year, which can mean fewer beetles around in a given year.
Insect populations have been declining worldwide, with some studies suggesting the problem is significant.
While some think of Christmas beetles – named for their yuletide arrival and festive bauble-like appearance – as pests, many will cast their minds nostalgically back to their youth and lament this pretty little creature’s decline.
Source: Ghosts of Christmases past: where are all the Christmas beetles?

Steampunk Animal and Insect Sculptures by Igor Verniy.

igor-1by Christopher Jobson.
Steampunk Animal and Insect Sculptures by Igor Verniy steampunk sculpture assemblage animals
From heaps of scrap metal, old bike chains, and silverware, sculptor Igor Verniy creates birds, butterflies, and other unusual creations.
Many of his steampunk and cyberpunk sculptures are made to be fully articulated, with dozens of moving or adjustable parts enabling each piece to be posed in several lifelike positions.
These are some of my favourite pieces but you can see more over on his VK and Facebook pages.
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See more wonderful sculptures via Steampunk Animal and Insect Sculptures by Igor Verniy | Colossal.

Why do Fly Swatters have Holes?

il_570xn-411650431_5aw6If you try hitting a horrible fly with something like a swatter without the tiny holes, air doesn’t pass through it, so the fly can feel the air current changing and can fly out of the way.

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Pictured: Louie the Fly became a bit of media star when television came to Australia in the late 1950s. He advertised Mortein Fly Spray of course.
The holes on a fly swatter reduce air resistance so you can swing it faster, and it doesn’t press an air current towards the fly, so hopefully he can’t feel it coming.
Therefore you should kill that fly, if you’re quick enough.
Source: Why do fly swatters have holes

Capturing the Fireflies of Japan.

When you see a firefly, it’s only for a moment. The bright light blinks and vanishes until it magically appears a few feet away.
But photographer Kei Nomiyama freezes the dance with long exposures that make hundreds of fireflies appear suspended in mid-air.
Nomiyama is an environmental science professor, but loves to spend his free time photographing the world he studies. “I became a scientist to protect nature, and I have an interest in photography to record nature,” he says.
The fireflies thrive in the forests of Shikoku Island where Nomiyama lives, and he’s spent the last eight years documenting their mating ritual with his camera.
The fireflies are most abundant during Japan’s rainy season between May and June, where they live a brief but beautiful two-week adult life.

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During that period, Nomiyama makes frequent into the forests around central Shikoku Island, seeking the perfect patch of trees or river for his shoot.
Once he finds a location, Nomiyama makes long exposures up to 30 minutes with his Canon EOS 5D Mark III and Sony Alpha a7R II.
Later, he digitally composites multiple frames together.
The final images are overflowing with hundreds of tiny lights. In the early 20th century, firefly hunters captured thousands of the insects to illuminate hotels and private gardens in Tokyo.
Nomiyama just needs his camera.

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See more images via Dazzling Long Exposures Capture the Fireflies of Japan | WIRED