Destruction in Broome, Western Australia.

1500Ingetje Tadros has been named a finalist in the feature/photographic essay category for her work, which presents an insider’s view of the struggles faced by remote Aboriginal communities undergoing the hardships that stem from dislocation.
This shot shows Meah, a five-year-old, standing outside her family home watching a bulldozer demolishing Kennedy Hill’s office in Broome.
The image reflects the news that the premier of Western Australia, Colin Barnett, committed to closing down about 150 remote Aboriginal communities in Western Australia.
Image Credit: Photograph by Ingetje Tadros/Diimex
Source: Walkley photo of the year: ice addict image wins prestigious award – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian

Nana Assenso, chief of Adidwan village, Ghana.

Nana Assenso, 68, chief of Adidwan, a village in Ghana’s interior, looks on before visiting the grave of his uncle Kwame Badu, in Adidwan, Ashanti Region, Ghanaon 21 July.
His uncle’s name Kwame Badu, has been passed on through the family in remembrance of an ancestor with that name who was captured and sold into slavery long, long ago.
“Growing up, I was told the story of two of my great-great-grand-uncles Kwame Badu and Kofi Aboagye who were captured and sold into slavery,” said Assenso.
He followed the family tradition and named his youngest son Kwame Badu.
Image Credit: REUTERS/Francis Kokoroko

Monument Valley, Navajo Nation Reservation.

Monument Valley sits on the Utah-Arizona border, within the Navajo Nation reservation.
The iconic sandstone buttes that dot the valley floor can mostly be accessed or viewed from Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, which—though instantly recognizable—has many fewer visitors annually than the nearby Grand Canyon.

Gathered here, a collection of images of some of the many moods of the valley, from wild storms to dusky evenings to bright, sunlit panoramas.
First Image: Monument Valley, as viewed from Hunts Mesa, near the Utah-Arizona border. Photograph by Chan Srithaweeporn / Getty
Second Image: Sunset under a dramatic sky in Monument Valley, as seen from Arizona. Photograph by Dean Fikar / Getty
See more Images via Source: Monument Valley in Photos – The Atlantic

​What dreams reveal about different cultures.

What dreams reveal about different cultures. Anthropology adds another dimension to the bigger conversation.
by Cory Rosenberg
Dreamcatchers in a breeze, Monument Valley, Utah. The inner web of a dream catcher pulls in bad dreams at night and discharges them during the day. The dangling feathers allow good dreams to trickle down to the person sleeping.
Image Credit: Photograph by Jane Rix/Shutterstock
We tend to think of our dreams as being uniquely personal — nighttime narratives built from our own experiences that help us process our day-to-day lives.
While dreams can give us a glimpse into the rich tapestries of our personal selves, anthropologists have culled data that suggests dreams weave their way into our cultural fabric, manifesting themselves in ways that shape societal beliefs and reveal collective anxieties.
When the Society for Psychological Anthropology held its biennial conference in April in Santa Ana Pueblo, New Mexico, anthropologists specializing in psychology and dreams explained their cultural dream research.
It was a discussion that not only showed how culture and dreams are intertwined, but also the differences across various cultures, according to Psychology Today.
Source: ​What dreams reveal about different cultures | MNN – Mother Nature Network

Beauty Contest in the Peruvian Rainforests.

bIn this June 23, 2015 photo, Yeni Casiano Barboza, 15, from the Ashaninka Indian community, Natividad, poses for a photo while waiting to compete in the annual beauty contest, in the Otari Nativo village, Pichari, Peru.
For Ashaninka men, a woman’s beauty is determined in part by her hair, her sense of humor, and whether she can cook a tasty cassava dish, according to some community members.
Gathered in the middle of the Amazon forest, the participants in the beauty contest wear the simple brown dresses of the Ashaninka indigenous woman, their faces dotted in a traditional design with a red dye extracted from a spice called achiote.
“The little red dots are my happiness,” said Beysi Anaya, a 17-year-old who won last month’s competition after traveling three hours by car from her native valley community of Sampantuari. She was crowned with a small straw hat featuring a long red feather.
It was the fifth beauty contest held among annual festivities marking the founding of the Ashaninka community of Otari Nativo, which is in a valley near the Apurimac, Ene and Mantaro rivers in the world’s largest coca-growing region.
The Ashaninka people number in the tens of thousands and live mostly in the rainforests of Peru.
aIn this June 23, 2015 photo, Ashaninka Indian school children parade with torches during festivities celebrating the 44th anniversary of their village, in Otari Nativo, Pichari, Peru.
The village is located in a valley near the Apurimac, Ene and Mantaro rivers in the world’s largest coca growing region.
In addition to the standard Ashaninka dress, the contestants also showed off a shorter, midriff-baring summer version that can be used for swimming. Multiple strands of colored beads crisscrossed their chest like bandoliers.
Other activities included an archery competition for men and women as well as a contest for drinking the fermented juice of the cassava root.
The community’s men smoked large amounts of meat for festival-goers to eat.
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For Ashaninka men, a woman’s beauty is determined in part by her hair — the longer, the better — and whether she can cook a tasty cassava dish, said community member and translator Marishori Samaniego.
A sense of humor is also important in determining attractiveness, said psychologist Leslie Villapolo, who has worked with the Ashaninka.
via AP PHOTOS: Indigenous festival in Peruvian rainforest – Houston Chronicle.
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