A Field of Light at Night in the Red Centre.

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Photo by Bruce Munro
Over 50,000 bulbs light up an expanse of Australia’s Red Centre desert near Ayers Rock in an installation about the size of four football fields.
The solar powered work, Field of Light Uluru, was produced by artist Bruce Munro who conceived the idea while visiting Uluru in 1992.
Twelve years later he created its first installation in a field behind his home, and it has since moved the work around to several different sights across the United Kingdom, United States, and Mexico.
Field of Light was a project that refused to leave the artist’s sketchbook.
“I saw in my mind a landscape of illuminated stems that, like the dormant seed in a dry desert, quietly wait until darkness falls, under a blazing blanket of southern stars, to bloom with gentle rhythms of light,” said Munro.
The British artist is best known for his light installations which often contain components numbering in the thousands.
These large works refer to his own experience as being a tiny element to life’s larger pattern, and employ light as a way to tap into a more emotional response with his viewers.
Profits for the installation will benefit the local community.
The Anangu tribe have named the piece Tili Wiru Tjuta Nyakutjaku in Pitjantjatjara which translates to “looking at lots of beautiful lights.
See more Images via 50,000 Solar Powered Bulbs Illuminate the Australian Desert in Bruce Munro’s Field of Light Installation | Colossal

Destruction in Broome, Western Australia.

1500Ingetje Tadros has been named a finalist in the feature/photographic essay category for her work, which presents an insider’s view of the struggles faced by remote Aboriginal communities undergoing the hardships that stem from dislocation.
This shot shows Meah, a five-year-old, standing outside her family home watching a bulldozer demolishing Kennedy Hill’s office in Broome.
The image reflects the news that the premier of Western Australia, Colin Barnett, committed to closing down about 150 remote Aboriginal communities in Western Australia.
Image Credit: Photograph by Ingetje Tadros/Diimex
Source: Walkley photo of the year: ice addict image wins prestigious award – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian

Nana Assenso, chief of Adidwan village, Ghana.

Nana Assenso, 68, chief of Adidwan, a village in Ghana’s interior, looks on before visiting the grave of his uncle Kwame Badu, in Adidwan, Ashanti Region, Ghanaon 21 July.
His uncle’s name Kwame Badu, has been passed on through the family in remembrance of an ancestor with that name who was captured and sold into slavery long, long ago.
“Growing up, I was told the story of two of my great-great-grand-uncles Kwame Badu and Kofi Aboagye who were captured and sold into slavery,” said Assenso.
He followed the family tradition and named his youngest son Kwame Badu.
Image Credit: REUTERS/Francis Kokoroko

Monument Valley, Navajo Nation Reservation.

Monument Valley sits on the Utah-Arizona border, within the Navajo Nation reservation.
The iconic sandstone buttes that dot the valley floor can mostly be accessed or viewed from Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, which—though instantly recognizable—has many fewer visitors annually than the nearby Grand Canyon.

Gathered here, a collection of images of some of the many moods of the valley, from wild storms to dusky evenings to bright, sunlit panoramas.
First Image: Monument Valley, as viewed from Hunts Mesa, near the Utah-Arizona border. Photograph by Chan Srithaweeporn / Getty
Second Image: Sunset under a dramatic sky in Monument Valley, as seen from Arizona. Photograph by Dean Fikar / Getty
See more Images via Source: Monument Valley in Photos – The Atlantic

​What dreams reveal about different cultures.

What dreams reveal about different cultures. Anthropology adds another dimension to the bigger conversation.
by Cory Rosenberg
Dreamcatchers in a breeze, Monument Valley, Utah. The inner web of a dream catcher pulls in bad dreams at night and discharges them during the day. The dangling feathers allow good dreams to trickle down to the person sleeping.
Image Credit: Photograph by Jane Rix/Shutterstock
We tend to think of our dreams as being uniquely personal — nighttime narratives built from our own experiences that help us process our day-to-day lives.
While dreams can give us a glimpse into the rich tapestries of our personal selves, anthropologists have culled data that suggests dreams weave their way into our cultural fabric, manifesting themselves in ways that shape societal beliefs and reveal collective anxieties.
When the Society for Psychological Anthropology held its biennial conference in April in Santa Ana Pueblo, New Mexico, anthropologists specializing in psychology and dreams explained their cultural dream research.
It was a discussion that not only showed how culture and dreams are intertwined, but also the differences across various cultures, according to Psychology Today.
Source: ​What dreams reveal about different cultures | MNN – Mother Nature Network