Ngiyaapaa girl prepares for Corroboree in Wilcannia.

Wilcannia, Australia
Ngiyaampaa girl Punta Williams poses for photographs on the dry river bed of the Darling River before performing at the Yaama Ngunna Baaka Corroboree festival in Wilcannia, New South Wales.
Aboriginal communities have recently held special festivals along the river ‘to heal the Barka’. Ochre-painted dancers performed around fires at dusk, revering the river but also seeking to draw attention to its plight.
Image Credit: Photograph: Tracey Nearmy/Reuters
Source: 20 photographs of the week | Art and design | The Guardian

Uluru at Sunset, N.T.

Uluru, as seen from the sunset viewing area, in the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park in Australia.
The park board decided unanimously that the climb will close permanently on October 26, 2019.
Sacred to the Yankunytjatjara and Pitjantjatjara people, climbing Uluru (also known as Ayers Rock) is strongly discouraged by them for its cultural significance and their concerns for people’s safety.
Over 30 people have died and numerous others have been injured while attempting the steep ascent.
Known as Anangu land, the arkose sandstone formation, 348 meters high is believed to be half a billion years old.
Image Credit: Photograph by Lisa Maree Williams / Getty
Source: Photos of the Week: Sky Glider, Ice Swimmer, Cave Basketball – The Atlantic

‘Spirit Island’, Jasper National Park.

Text & Photography By Christopher Hawkins
Spirit Island is one of the most iconic locations in Alberta despite its small size. Emerald waters, pristine conifers and rugged snow-capped peaks surround the island.
The box canyon where Maligne Lake resides was named the “Hall of the Gods” by Mary Schaffer, the first European to discover the lake in 1908.
However, the island itself has been a site of spiritual significance to the native Nakoda people long before European settlers arrived.
Reaching the island is no small endeavour, requiring a 30-mile drive from Jasper on Maligne Lake Road to the dock, and then travelling by boat for 8.7 miles to the final destination.
Source: Photographing Spirit Island, Jasper National Park, Alberta

A Field of Light at Night in the Red Centre.

BruceMunro_07

Photo by Bruce Munro
Over 50,000 bulbs light up an expanse of Australia’s Red Centre desert near Ayers Rock in an installation about the size of four football fields.
The solar powered work, Field of Light Uluru, was produced by artist Bruce Munro who conceived the idea while visiting Uluru in 1992.
Twelve years later he created its first installation in a field behind his home, and it has since moved the work around to several different sights across the United Kingdom, United States, and Mexico.
Field of Light was a project that refused to leave the artist’s sketchbook.
“I saw in my mind a landscape of illuminated stems that, like the dormant seed in a dry desert, quietly wait until darkness falls, under a blazing blanket of southern stars, to bloom with gentle rhythms of light,” said Munro.
The British artist is best known for his light installations which often contain components numbering in the thousands.
These large works refer to his own experience as being a tiny element to life’s larger pattern, and employ light as a way to tap into a more emotional response with his viewers.
Profits for the installation will benefit the local community.
The Anangu tribe have named the piece Tili Wiru Tjuta Nyakutjaku in Pitjantjatjara which translates to “looking at lots of beautiful lights.
See more Images via 50,000 Solar Powered Bulbs Illuminate the Australian Desert in Bruce Munro’s Field of Light Installation | Colossal

Destruction in Broome, Western Australia.

1500Ingetje Tadros has been named a finalist in the feature/photographic essay category for her work, which presents an insider’s view of the struggles faced by remote Aboriginal communities undergoing the hardships that stem from dislocation.
This shot shows Meah, a five-year-old, standing outside her family home watching a bulldozer demolishing Kennedy Hill’s office in Broome.
The image reflects the news that the premier of Western Australia, Colin Barnett, committed to closing down about 150 remote Aboriginal communities in Western Australia.
Image Credit: Photograph by Ingetje Tadros/Diimex
Source: Walkley photo of the year: ice addict image wins prestigious award – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian

Nana Assenso, chief of Adidwan village, Ghana.

Nana Assenso, 68, chief of Adidwan, a village in Ghana’s interior, looks on before visiting the grave of his uncle Kwame Badu, in Adidwan, Ashanti Region, Ghanaon 21 July.
His uncle’s name Kwame Badu, has been passed on through the family in remembrance of an ancestor with that name who was captured and sold into slavery long, long ago.
“Growing up, I was told the story of two of my great-great-grand-uncles Kwame Badu and Kofi Aboagye who were captured and sold into slavery,” said Assenso.
He followed the family tradition and named his youngest son Kwame Badu.
Image Credit: REUTERS/Francis Kokoroko