A Field of Light at Night in the Red Centre.

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Photo by Bruce Munro
Over 50,000 bulbs light up an expanse of Australia’s Red Centre desert near Ayers Rock in an installation about the size of four football fields.
The solar powered work, Field of Light Uluru, was produced by artist Bruce Munro who conceived the idea while visiting Uluru in 1992.
Twelve years later he created its first installation in a field behind his home, and it has since moved the work around to several different sights across the United Kingdom, United States, and Mexico.
Field of Light was a project that refused to leave the artist’s sketchbook.
“I saw in my mind a landscape of illuminated stems that, like the dormant seed in a dry desert, quietly wait until darkness falls, under a blazing blanket of southern stars, to bloom with gentle rhythms of light,” said Munro.
The British artist is best known for his light installations which often contain components numbering in the thousands.
These large works refer to his own experience as being a tiny element to life’s larger pattern, and employ light as a way to tap into a more emotional response with his viewers.
Profits for the installation will benefit the local community.
The Anangu tribe have named the piece Tili Wiru Tjuta Nyakutjaku in Pitjantjatjara which translates to “looking at lots of beautiful lights.
See more Images via 50,000 Solar Powered Bulbs Illuminate the Australian Desert in Bruce Munro’s Field of Light Installation | Colossal

Cholita women conquer Highest Peaks in Mountain Range, Bolivia.

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Eleven Aymara indigenous women, ages 42 to 50, who worked as porters and cooks for mountaineers, put on crampons – spikes fixed to a boot for climbing – under their wide traditional skirts and started to do their own climbing.
These women have now scaled five peaks: Acotango, Parinacota, Pomarapi and Huayna Potosí as well as Illimani, the highest of all, in the Cordillera Real range.
All are higher than 19,500ft (6,000 meters) above sea level Bolivia’s cholita climbers scale highest mountain yet.

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Photographs by David Mercado/Reuters

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Aymara indigenous women Lidia Huayllas, 48, and Dora Magueno, 50, stand near Milluni lake, with Huayna Potosí mountain in the background.
See more images via Bolivian cholita climbers conquer highest peaks near La Paz – in pictures | World news | The Guardian

Canning Stock Route runs from the Kimberley to Wiluna.

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AUSTRALIA’S ICONIC CANNING STOCK Route, created in 1906, runs for 1800 km through Western Australia from the Kimberley to Wiluna in the state’s mid-west.
The history of this famous cattle track has typically been told from a colonial perspective, but a new exhibition at the Australian Museum , which has previously toured the National Museum of Australia in Canberra, seeks to retell the story through Aboriginal eyes and voices
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“The Canning Stock Route (CSR) is a place where Indigenous and non-Indigenous histories intersect. This exhibition tells the story of the recovery of the Indigenous histories,” says Michael Pickering, head of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Program at the National Museum of Australia. “For many years the story of the stock route was represented as a white man’s story.
This exhibition, and the collection that forms its heart, allows us to recognise that its history goes back much further and is held in the hearts and minds of the Aboriginal people of the region.”
Read on via Canning Stock Route: the Aboriginal story – Australian Geographic.

Destruction in Broome by Ingetje Tadros.

1500Ingetje Tadros has been named a finalist in the feature/photographic essay category for her work, which presents an insider’s view of the struggles faced by remote Aboriginal communities undergoing the hardships that stem from dislocation.
This shot shows Meah, a five-year-old, standing outside her family home watching a bulldozer demolishing Kennedy Hill’s office in Broome.
The image reflects the news that the premier of Western Australia, Colin Barnett, committed to closing down about 150 remote Aboriginal communities in Western Australia.
Image Credit: Photograph by Ingetje Tadros/Diimex
Source: Walkley photo of the year: ice addict image wins prestigious award – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian

The Mushuanu Innu of Labrador, Canada.

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Labrador, Canada
The Mushuau Innu of Labrador were one of the last indigenous peoples to be forced to settle by the Canadian government in 1967.
Many families still stay Nutshimit (on the land) for several months, hunting caribou, fishing and picking berries while living in their tents.
Image Credit: Photograph by Sarah Sandring/Survival International
via Indigenous peoples – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian.

Ancient Aboriginal Astronomy, Australia.

EmuInTheSky_Web_LoQual_sRGBIt is acknowledged that Australian Aboriginal culture is heavily spiritual and symbolic, but a rock engraving in a national park near Sydney suggests that the indigenous belief system represents a deep knowledge of the sky and the motion of the bodies within it.
Scientists at Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) have presented the hypothesis that Aborigines – whose existence stretches back, unbroken, for more than 50,000 years – could have been the world’s first astronomers.
Coalsack Dark Nebula (within the Milky Way) is known to the Wardaman Aboriginal people as the head of the ‘Emu In The Sky’.
The rest of its body falls to the left, seen as the darkness between the stars.
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In the Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park, near Sydney, is an ancient Aboriginal rock engraving of the Emu In The Sky, oriented in such a way so as to line up with the nebula where it appears in the sky at the time when real-life emus are laying their eggs.
This engraving, and the CSIRO’s research, could change people’s understanding of Aboriginal people and the development of advanced human thinking.
See more via Ancient Aboriginal Astronomy | Atlas Obscura.