Bhangarh, India’s Haunted City.

Bhangarh ghost city India 2It has lain abandoned for the best part of 400 years and is said to be the most haunted place in India.

Situated between the cities of Delhi and Jaipur in the state of Rajasthan the true reason for its abandonment has been lost to history, though there are several legends surrounding its fate.

Even today no-one is allowed to enter the ghost city of Bhangarh after twilight – it is said that if they do they will never return.

Bhangarh ghost city India 1Image credit Flickr User Saad.Akhtar

Within the grounds there are still majestic temples to major Hindu deities: Shiva, Lavina Devi and Gopinath are represented among others but the throngs of worshipers who clamoured for entrance to the temple are long gone.

The town was first built in the reign of Bhagwant Das, a powerful maharaja, in 1573.

It is said that a local guru was asked for permission to build the city.Bhangarh ghost city India 3

Read further via Bhangarh – India’s Haunted City ~ Kuriositas

The Indian farm where George Orwell was born.

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George Orwell is one of the United Kingdom’s best-known 20th Century authors but he’s also claimed by a town in north-eastern India.
Orwell was born here – and his home is being turned into a museum.
There are farmyard animals everywhere. An iron door lies wide open, as if the rebellious animals have forgotten to bolt it after chasing their human masters away.
Pigs have the run of the place. Two horses, their frames withered with age, stand in one corner, swishing their tails to drive the flies away, and there are many more animals – cows, goats, sheep, hens.
Only the buffaloes would have looked out of place in Animal Farm.
This is where Orwell spent the first year of his life, before he and his mother moved to Henley on Thames.
Close to the bungalow where they lived are the remains of a warehouse which was used to store opium.
via BBC News – The Indian Animal Farm where Orwell was born.

Lion Tailed Macaques.

dec14_e03_macaquesBy Trisha Gupta, Photographs by Anup Shah & Fiona Rogers
Back when the forest was thicker, it was difficult even to catch a glimpse of a lion-tailed macaque.
Small, shy and quiet (nearly silent by howler standards), the monkeys are so habituated to the shadow-filled canopy that some scientists consider them the only truly arboreal macaques on earth.
And they only live in the Western Ghats, a mountain range along India’s western coast.
Because counting the furtive creatures isn’t easy, the best guess is that only 3,500 or so survive.
Whether that number is greater or fewer than decades ago isn’t certain, but the more scientists know about the monkey, the more they fear that road-building, logging and other human encroachments pose a serious threat to the glossy black primate with the arresting mane and tufted, leonine tail.
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A small village in the state of Kerala, in southwestern India, Nelliyampathy is among the best places to see lion-tailed macaques in what looks like a relatively intact habitat.
Many nearby coffee and tea plantations have been abandoned and have begun their slow return to wilderness. My guide, Joseph J. Erinjery, a gangly 27-year-old graduate student at the University of Mysore, spots a group of about 40 animals feasting in jackfruit trees and brings his truck to a halt.
The slapstick scene before us pits one of the world’s smallest macaques, maxing out at some 20 pounds and two feet tall, against the world’s largest tree-borne fruit, which can weigh as much as 100 pounds and reaches three feet.
I watched a monkey balance between two branches, use its forelimbs to immobilize a jackfruit larger than itself and proceed to tear into it with sharp front teeth. I also saw a young male teetering on two legs as he carried one off to eat on his own.
About a three-and-a-half-hour drive southeast of here, in and around Indira Gandhi National Park, in the state of Tamil Nadu, the photographers Anup Shah and Fiona Rogers spent four weeks observing the daily rhythms of another troop of macaques. “Feed, rest, feed, rest, feed, rest, move to another site, feed and rest,” Shah says jokingly of the monkey’s lifestyle.
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Read on via These Intense Photos of Lion-Tailed Macaques Will Turn You Into a Conservationist | Science | Smithsonian.

The Elephant Festival, Jaipur.

The Elephant Festival takes over the city of Jaipur every year. The animals are draped with jewellery and given majestic multicolour makeovers (complete with pedicures), before doing a procession through the streets.
Later they race, play elephant polo and take part in a human v animal tug-of-war. Charles Freger travelled to Rajasthan to get a sneak peek.
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See more Images via The extraordinary painted elephants of India – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian.

Two Watermelon Farmers, West Bengal.

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This winning photograph of two watermelon farmers by Atkins Ciewm in West Bengal, India will feature alongside over 100 photographic artworks in a display at the Royal Geographical Society in London.
Image Credit: Photograph by Atkins Ciewm.
via Atkins Ciwem environmental photographer of the year 2015 winners – in pictures | Environment | The Guardian.