Indian Kushti Wrestlers live a Spartan existence.

Image Credit: Photograph by © Alain Schroeder. All rights reserved.
Kushti is the traditional form of Indian wrestling.
Practised in Akhara, the wrestlers, under the supervision of a guru, dedicate their bodies and minds to Kushti on average for 6 to 36 months.
It is a way of life and a spartan existence that requires rigorous discipline.
Kushti is also known as pehlwani. The freestyle matches last about half an hour, and a wrestler typically wins by simultaneously pinning an opponent’s shoulders and hips to the ground.
Experienced wrestlers set the example and transmit their skills in the pit and in the community to the younger boys (7-8 years old) and new recruits, whereby promoting camaraderie, solidarity and fraternity.
See more great Images via Kushti | Smithsonian Photo Contest | Smithsonian

Stum brings 3D to the Streets.

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The 3D painting of a Kolkata street at Vivekananda Park Athletic Club, Haridevpur. Artist Tracy Lee Stum also seen. ( Source: Express photo by Partha paul )
Written by Arshad Ali
Those who have seen 3D street art in films and e-mail forwards, here is an opportunity to witness one in Kolkata.
The puja organised by Vivekananda Park Athletic Club at Haridevpur has put this form of art on display for visitors.
They roped in Tracy Lee Stum, an artist globally known for her street paintings, all the way from South California to help create the painting.
The theme has been called Tilottama which signifies both Goddess Durga and Kolkata. Different forms of arts have been blended in to depict the city and its transition over the years.
While the 3D painting, which has a bird’s eye view, is spread on a giant plywood canvas of 25 feet by 20 feet on the floor, the ceiling has paintings of an ant’s eye view of different areas of the city.
Read more via US artist brings alive Kolkata street in 3D | The Indian Express.

Images from ‘Hortus Malabaricus’ on Plant medicine, c. 1680.

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Selected illustrations from the stunning Hortus Malabaricus (Garden of Malabar), an epic treatise dealing with the medicinal properties of the flora in the Indian state of Kerala.
Originally written in Latin, it was compiled over a period of nearly 30 years and published in Amsterdam between 1678 and 1693 in 12 volumes of about 500 pages each, with a total of 794 copper plate engravings.
The book was conceived by Hendrik van Rheede, who was the Governor of Dutch Malabar at the time, and he is said to have taken a keen personal interest in the compilation.
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The work was edited by a team of nearly a hundred including physicians (such as Ranga Bhat, Vinayaka Pandit, Appu Bhat and Itti Achuden) professors of medicine and botany, amateur botanists (such as Arnold Seyn, Theodore Jansson of Almeloveen, Paul Hermann, Johannes Munnicks, Joannes Commelinus, Abraham a Poot), and technicians, illustrators and engravers, together with the collaboration of company officials, clergymen (D. John Caesarius and the Discalced Carmelite Mathaeus of St. Joseph’s Monastery at Varapuzha).
7561714328_67b7db25d8_oVan Rheede was also assisted by the King of Cochin and the ruling Zamorin of Calicut.
Prominent among the Indian contributors were three Gouda Saraswat Brahmins named Ranga Bhat, Vinayaka Pandit,Appu Bhat and Malayali physician, Itti Achuden, who was an Ezhava doctor of the Mouton Coast of Malabar.
The book has been translated into English and Malayalam by Dr. K. S. Manilal. (Wikipedia).
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Click for more Images via Hortus Malabaricus (1678-1693) | The Public Domain Review.

Art in the Streets of Bandra.

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A mural of a scene from Mughal-E-Azam in Mumbai, created for the Bollywood Art Project (all photographs by the author)
Walls in India are hardly ever bare; it’s a difficult task to find a wall in the country that isn’t covered in fly-posters, paan spittle, or colorful graffiti.
But one Indian suburb is taking this latter example to an extreme.
Bandra, a suburb located in West Mumbai, was originally developed as a trading post for the Portuguese in the 16th century, but today is known for its diverse street art. I
n the streets surrounding its array of unique restaurants and hip cafes, it is impossible to visit without stumbling across the work of talented artists living and working within the area.
However, Bandra hasn’t always been Mumbai’s street art capital.
In 2008, four artists from the National Institute of Design started the Wall Project.
The initiative aimed to add a bit of color to Bandra by turning its dull and vacant walls into vibrant pieces of art, thereby rejuvenating several areas that had long been in ruin.
Over the last few years they have given the suburb a terrific makeover — one that reflects the diverse range of people and perspectives within the community, whilst transforming its damaged and decrepit walls.
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Read on via Atlas Obscura
http://goo.gl/chT1QO

The Pink, Blue & White Festival.

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Nandgaon, India People celebrate Holi in a temple at the Uttar Pradesh Holi festival. Photograph: Zuma/Rex
The Guardian’s picture editors bring you a selection of the best photographs from around the world, including Milan Fashion Week, Uttar Pradesh Holi festival, Prince William with Shaun the Sheep in China and a very, very cold swim.
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Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic A performer with body paint takes part in an event marking the closing of national carnival celebrations in the Malecón of Santo Domingo
Photograph: Ricardo Rojas/Reuters

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New York, US A worker cleans the snow from the pavement in Midtown Manhattan as snow falls again in the city
Photograph: Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images
See more Images via Photo highlights of the day | News | The Guardian.