Ice Caves at Búri.

There are a number of unique caving experiences across Iceland but most pale in comparison to Búri, an immense, tubular cave created by irregularly cooled magma.
Discovered fairly recently in 2005, the Búri lava tunnel is thought to be one of the most significant discoveries of its kind in the last 1,000 years due to its size and its one-of-a-kind formations.
The tunnel runs over half a mile underground and at its largest point the cavern’s size checks in at 32 feet tall and 32 feet wide. One of the most remarkable aspects of the long cave is that at some point it was full of rushing magma.
The structure formed when the lava on the edges of the flow cooled much faster than the interior plasma, creating a solid tube while the excess lava drained out the end.
There is still a 56-foot lava fall (read: hole) at the end of the tunnel marking where the lava drained out.
In addition to the rocky tube itself, due to the chilly climate within the stone, huge, bulbous icicles form in both stalactite and stalagmite formations.
Despite being forged in fire, it may be these ice formations that Búri is best known for.

via Búri | Atlas Obscura.

Northern Light shine over Kerid Volcanic Crater Lake.

Photographer Sigurdur William camped out at the edge of the Kerid volcanic crater lake in Iceland where he captured this unusual view of the Northern lights and stars reflected on the water’s surface.
Located in southern Iceland the Kerid is one of many crater lakes in the area that are frequented by locals and tourists alike, some of who visit through Sigurdur William’s photography tour business Arctic Shots.
(via Astronomy Picture of the Day)
Source: A Stunning View of the Northern Lights over Iceland Reflected in a Volcanic Crater Lake | Colossal

Alien Light in the Snow.

lucid-10Electroluminescent light shapes installed in the otherworldly landscapes of Iceland by German artists Tarek Mawad and Friedrich van Schoor, also known as 3hund.

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The geometric shapes, sharp lines and luminous spheres have an eerie effect as the camera pans around the valleys and mountains before encountering the luminous forms that seem alien.

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The installations were created in real time, without the use of CGI, by using electroluminescent wires and shapes placed on a rock surface or suspended in the air using a kite or drone.
View more images via Lucid: Light Installations by 3hund

William Patino in Iceland.

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Australian photographer William Patino’s short time in the photography world has made a big impact.
The young artist, who currently resides in Wollongong, Australia, began to pursue photography in 2012 and hasn’t looked back since.
After working as a tradesman for over 8 years, the shift in careers was drastic, yet Patino hit the ground running and has managed to build a name for himself in the industry, working for various clients including Tourism Australia, Flight Centre, and Apple.

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Recently, Patino took a 10-day journey to explore Iceland, and was blown away by the rugged beauty of the country’s natural landscape.
The trip refreshed the young artist, as he wandered the country and captured some stunning images of the awe-inspiring natural beauty of our earth.
Given it’s size, Iceland had a fairly low density of people, with a population of just over 300,000.
Known for it’s dramatic volcanoes, geysers, and hot springs, the country has an untouched and raw quality that Patino’s landscape shots accurately portray.

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 William Patino: Website | Facebook
Read and See more Images via Interview: William Patino Captures the Beauty of Iceland’s Vast, Untouched Landscapes – My Modern Met

Lighthouse Aurora.

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An incredible Aurora helps a little lighthouse in the South of Iceland to illuminate the dark Icelandic night.
Image Credit: Photographer: Leonardo Papèra Calavorno, resident of  Italy.
Smithsonian Member since 2016.
Source: Showing Who Is Boss | Smithsonian Photo Contest | Smithsonian