Terry Jones: ‘I’ve got dementia.

Old friends Michael Palin and Terry Jones, right, at Jones’s home in London this month. Photograph: Robin McKie for the Observer
Terry Jones first exhibited signs that all was not well with his health in July 2014. He and his close friend Michael Palin were performing with the rest of the surviving Monty Python’s Flying Circus troupe in a show of sketches and songs, Monty Python live (mostly) at the O2 in London.
“Terry was always very good at remembering lines,” recalled Palin last week. “But this time he had real problems, and in the end he had to use a teleprompter. That was a first for him. I realised then that something more serious than memory lapses was affecting him.”

Jones, now 75, later passed standard tests designed to pinpoint people who have Alzheimer’s disease. His speech continued to deteriorate nevertheless. “He said less and less at dinner parties, when he used to love to lead conversations,” said his daughter Sally.
Eventually, in September 2015, Jones was diagnosed as having frontotemporal dementia (FTD), a condition that affects the front and sides of the brain, where language and social control centres are based. When cells there die off, people lose their ability to communicate, and their behaviour becomes increasingly erratic and impulsive. Unlike Alzheimer’s, there is no loss of reasoning or orientation. However, planning, decision making and speech are affected, and patients often seem less caring or concerned about their family and friends.
Sally recalls that even though her father’s speech was faltering, he was still initially able to outline his plans and thoughts by email. “However, the emails slowly became more and more jumbled, and by autumn last year he had to give up,” she said. “For someone who lived by words and discussions this was tragic.”
Jones’s family revealed his condition to the public six months ago, and at last year’s Bafta Cymru ceremony in October, his son Bill had to help his father collect his award for outstanding contribution to television and film. The only words that Jones was able to utter were to tell his audience to “quieten down”.
Continue on via Source: Terry Jones: ‘I’ve got dementia. My frontal lobe has absconded’ | Society | The Guardian

The Best Way to Wash Your Fruit and Veggies.

Image Credit: iStock/courtneyk
The produce aisle is one of the best places in a grocery store to ensure you’re stocking up on nutrient-rich foods that add fiber, increase satiety, and generally keep your body in working order.
But as we’ve previously explained, those grocery store water nozzles are mainly for theatrics, and to add a little bulk to vegetables sold by weight—not to clean your produce.To really make sure your vegetables are clean and free of bacteria before adding them to meals, you need to take action at home.
As The Washington Post’s Becky Krystal recently explained, it’s a little more involved than just running lettuce under the faucet.The first thing you want to do is wash your own hands.
It makes little sense to rinse vegetables if your handling of them just reintroduces germs. Then, wash your produce with plain water and gently rub the surface to dislodge any gunk.
If it’s a root vegetable, like a carrot, you probably want to use a stiff brush to attack the soil left behind.
For leafy greens, a water bath might be preferable to a spray wash. Tearing off the outer layer will get rid of a lot of bacteria, and the remaining debris in the inner layers will get dislodged after being submerged. (You might be surprised by the dirt left at the bottom of a water basin.) Five minutes is sufficient. To avoid serving soggy leaves or herbs, dry them with a towel or in a salad spinner.
It’s also a good idea to wash your produce just before you’re ready to prepare your meal, not right after you bring it home.
Washing and then refrigerating just leads to dampness that expedites spoilage. And yes, you should wash your fruit, or anything else with skin.
Even though apples and oranges are basically sealed, you don’t want any surface bacteria moving to the interior when cutting or peeling.
[h/t The Washington Post]
Source: The Best Way to Wash Your Fruits and Veggies | Mental Floss

Germs & early Ice Cream Street Vendors.

An ice cream vendor in New York hands a young girl an ice cream, circa 1920.

An ice cream vendor in New York hands a young girl an ice cream, circa 1920.
Image Credit: Elizabeth R. Hibbs/Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Before the tinny melody of “Pop Goes The Weasel” brought swarms of sweaty kids to the streets for an ice cream cone, mobile ice cream vendors used more primitive—and less sanitary—means.
In the late 19th century, vendors sold dishes of ice cream from carts cooled with ice blocks, which meant customers would lick their dish clean and then return it to the seller to use for his next customer. Not exactly a model of hygiene.
Before widespread milk pasteurization, ice cream also came topped with the threat of bacteria that could cause scarlet fever, tuberculosis, and other extreme ailments.
The frozen treat became safer to order after studies of typhoid in New York implicated raw milk, causing most cities to require pasteurization, and inventions like the ice cream cone made that whole sharing dishes issue disappear.
Technological advances around the same time made refrigeration easier and scoopers traded in their carts for cars.
Ice cream trucks, which first appeared in the 1920s, have seen something of a resurgence in recent years as other food trucks have flourished and anything vintage has become hipster cool, but the once-ubiquitous carts tend to remain relegated to zoos, amusement parks, and other touristy areas.
Source: 8 Summertime Treats We Should Bring Back | Mental Floss

Hunt’s Remedy for Kidney Complaints, circa 1860.

rds56design150_medWilliam E. Clarke of Providence, Rhode Island produced and marketed “Hunt’s Remedy”, a widely sold nostrum for kidney complaints, for decades. Research into Providence city directories from 1859 (no mention of Clarke) through 1910 provides insight into Clarke and his activities.
His name first appears in 1860, listed as a clerk at a business located at 43 Wickenden Street; I suspect the number “43” might be a typographical error and that Clarkemay have worked at the apothecary and dry goods store of Benjamin Bailey at 46 & 48 Wickenden.
Clarke’s home address is given as 58 Sheldon Street, which is also the address of John Clarke, “Carpenter & Builder”.
I strongly suspect that John (whose directory appearances and advertisements date back to 1850) was William’s father.

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The Hunt’s store at 28 Market Street with his traveling wagon posed out front, complete with dog sitting in the front, 1860s. The man in the doorway is likely William E. Clarke, and the driver holding the reins may well be his traveling salesman W. B. Blanding. ( from a stereo view in Sheaff collection ).
William’s name does not appear again until 1864, at the end of the Civil War. Research in other sources indicate that he enrolled in the 11th Regiment of the Rhode Island Volunteers on September 15, 1862.
On November 4, 1863 Clarke married Emma P. Mason of Providence. In the 1864 directory he is listed as an apothecary at 233 South Main Street (“Corner of South Main and Transit Sts.”), and as boarding at 58 Williams Street. In 1866 he is listed as a clerk again, at 40 Weybosset Street (the address of Mason, Dawley & Baker, apothecaries).
Importantly to the story of his career, in 1866 the earliest advertisement for Hunt’s Remedy of Providence which I have so far uncovered (appearing on a broadsheet “The National Hotel Register”, December 5, 1866, Worcester, Massachusetts) lists “William E. Clarke, Proprietor, 28 Market Street, Providence.
” The 1867 Providence directory lists him as the proprietor of an apothecary at 28 Market Street. Later, in an 1883 Hunt’s Remedy “ABC” advertising pamphlet, Clarke states that Hunt’s Remedy “had been on the market several years prior to 1867” and also that “In 1867 Hunt’s Remedy attracted my particular attention”.
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The most common Hunt’s Remedy trade card “Copyrighted 1883”
Continue the article via Hunt’s Remedy | Sheaff : ephemera.

Dyslexia or Word Blindness.

Photographic Image: British Prime Minister Winston Churchill was a very famous person with Dyslexia.
Dyslexia defined by Google search is a: “Developmental reading disorder is a reading disability that occurs when the brain does not properly recognize and process certain symbols.” Wow, that is so clinical and precise.
Dyslexia is much more than a learning disability. Yet before the 1900′s, this childhood development was the subject of much conjecture and how children learned was still pretty much theorised.
A plethora of terms was used to describe the problem such as “word blindness” or “strephosymbolia.”
It was 1878 when German neurologist, Adolph Kussmaul, coined the phrase “word blindness” describing what we know as dyslexia today.
He had a special interest in adults with reading problems who also had neurological impairment.
He noticed that several of his patients could not read properly and regularly used words in the wrong order. He introduced the term ‘word blindness’ to describe their difficulties.
The phrase, word blindness, then began to be used regularly in the medical journals to describe adults and children who had difficulty learning to read.
This phrase also conveyed the fact that these patients were neurologically impaired. ~ Understanding Dyslexia: A Guide for Teachers and Parents: The history of dyslexia
In 1887, a German opthalmologist, Rudolf Berlin, was the first to use the word ‘dyslexia’ but it wasn’t widely used or accepted to replace the “word blindness” as of yet.
It’s like Manic Depressive Disorder perfectly describes the condition… Whereas Bipolar Disorder took a while to catch on. Seems the same was true for “word blindness” that perfectly describes dyslexia, where we skipped words, suffixes and endings.
“Dyslexia appeared in 1891 with a report in The Lancet medical journal by Dr Dejerne.”
Ah, ha just when you think Dyslexia would go mainstream:
“Dr James Hinshelwood, a Scottish eye surgeon, published an account of a patient who had reading difficulties and also a congenital defect in the brain related to eyesight.
From this evidence, he concluded that the cause of reading difficulties was a malfunction of eyesight as a result of a brain defect.
Dr Hinshelwood’s work reinforced the use of the term word blindness and this phrase persisted throughout the early twentieth century.”
Read further via The History Of Dyslexia | Mental Health Humor.

Monster Soup (polluted Thames Water) by Pry, 1828.

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Coloured satirical engraving by William Heath (1795-1840), also know by his pseudonym Paul Pry, showing a lady discovering the quality of the Thames water.
The top title reads: ‘Microcosm dedicated to the London Water Companies. Brought forth all monstrous, all prodigious things, hydras and organs, and chimeras dire.’ The bottom title reads:
‘Monster Soup commonly called Thames Water being a correct representation of that precious stuff doled out to us!’.
It is probably a reference to the water distributed by the Chelsea Water works.
By the 1820s, public concern was growing at the increasingly polluted water supply taken from the Thames in London.
In 1831 and 1832 the city experienced its first outbreaks of cholera.
via Image of ‘monster soup’, 1828. by Science & Society Picture Library.
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