Cath, Daphne and Max Gill’s Salad Roll.

freshly-made-roll-veg-177Cath Wing collapsed while making sandwiches in the Old Guv Canteen in King William Road.
Michael “Bulldog” Byrne related this story to me recently at The Bunyip, in Gawler, where we work. He actually witnessed this incident back in the early 1970’s.
While making the lunch orders Cath Wing collapsed on the Canteen floor, clutching her chest. Daphne Gsodam her offsider, was quick to the rescue!
Leaning over Cath did Daphne ask the question that any caring person would ask in those circumstances…
No! it wasn’t, “Are you OK, Cath?” OR
“Shall I call an Ambulance for you Cath?” OR
“Can I help you Cath?” OR any other number of caring questions….
…..Leaning in closer to listen to what could possibly be Cath’s last words.
Daphne asked, “This is real important Cath.” “Does Max Gill have tomato on his Salad Roll?”!
“As Cath laid there clutching her chest, she squeezed out the words, ‘Yes, Daphne, Max does have tomato on his salad roll!’
She Lived.
Stolen Biro

The Latest on Don Woolman.

Hi Rod,
Just an update on Dad since last week. 
They have started to try and graft skin back onto his right foot.
He has several surgeries still to come to put plates and screws in to hold the fractures in both ankles.
Unfortunately, he was meant to have two surgeries last week but they were cancelled.
The plan is for one longer op. today to pin his left foot.
He has lost his toes on the right foot and they need to do more skin grafting on this leg to see if it will heal.
The surgery takes a lot out of Dad and they have to allow enough time between sessions for his body and spirits to recover. 
It is going to be a long and slow road ahead for Don. 
I will let you know how the next surgery goes. 
Kind Regards,
Sandy Woolman

Your Blood type is more complicated than you think.

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Not long ago, a precious packet of blood traveled more than 7,000 miles by special courier, from America to Australia, to save the life of a newborn. Months before the delivery date, a routine checkup of the mom-to-be had revealed that the fetus suffered from hemolytic disease.
Doctors knew that the baby would need a blood transfusion immediately after delivery. The problem was, the baby’s blood type was so rare that there wasn’t a single compatible donor in all of Australia.
A request for compatible blood was sent first to England, where a global database search identified a potential donor in the United States.
From there, the request was forwarded to the American Rare Donor Program, directed by Sandra Nance. The ARDP had compatible frozen blood on hand, but Nance knew that a frozen bag might rupture in transit.
So her organization reached out to the compatible donor, collected half a liter of fresh blood, and shipped it across the Pacific. When the mother came in to give birth, the blood was waiting. “It was just magic,” Nance says.
You’re probably aware of eight basic blood types: A, AB, B and O, each of which can be “positive” or “negative.” They’re the most important, because a patient who receives ABO +/– incompatible blood very often experiences a dangerous immune reaction.
For the sake of simplicity, these are the types that organizations like the Red Cross usually talk about. But this system turns out to be a big oversimplification.
Each of these eight types of blood can be subdivided into many distinct varieties. There are millions in all, each classified according to the little markers called antigens that coat the surface of red blood cells.
AB blood contains A and B antigens, while O blood doesn’t contain either; “positive” blood contains the Rhesus D antigen, while “negative” blood lacks it. Patients shouldn’t receive antigens that their own blood lacks—otherwise their immune system may recognize the blood as foreign and develop antibodies to attack it.
That’s why medical professionals pay attention to blood types in the first place, and why compatible blood was so important for the baby in Australia. There are in fact hundreds of antigens that fall into 33 recognized antigen systems, many of which can cause dangerous reactions during transfusion.
One person’s blood can contain a long list of antigens, which means that a fully specified blood type has to be written out antigen by antigen—for example, O, r”r”, K:–1, Jk(b-).
Try fitting that into that little space on your Red Cross card.
Read more via Your Blood Type is a Lot More Complicated Than You Think | Science | Smithsonian.

Philadelphia College students experiment in physics laboratory c. 1933.

Credit: Wellcome Collection
Description: Founded in 1821, the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science was the first college of pharmaceutical sciences in the United States
Publication/Creation: publisher not identified.
Physical description: photograph silver gelatin.  
Source: Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science: students experimenting in a physics laboratory. Photograph, c. 1933. |

Pleasure and Pain from Coffee.

balzac163 years after his death, Honoré de Balzac remains an extremely modern-sounding wag.
Were he alive today, he’d no doubt be pounding out his provocative observations in a coffice, a café whose free wifi, lenient staff, and abundant electrical outlets make it a magnet for writers.
One has a hunch Starbucks would not suffice…
Judging by his humorous essay, “The Pleasures and Pains of Coffee,” Balzac would seek out a place that stays open past midnight, and the strongest, most arcane brewing methods.
The Bucket of Black Snakes was his Green Fairy. He was that most cunning of addicts, sometimes imbibing up to 50 cups of coffee a day, carefully husbanding his binges, knowing just when to pull back from the edge in order to prolong his vice.
Coffee — he called it a “great power in [his] life” — made possible a grueling writing schedule that had him going to bed at six, rising at 1am to work until eight in the morning, then grabbing forty winks before putting in another seven hours.
It takes more than a couple of cappuccinos to maintain that kind of pace.
Whenever a reasonable human dose failed to stimulate, Balzac would begin eating coffee powder on an empty stomach, a “horrible, rather brutal method” that he recommended “only to men of excessive vigor, men with thick black hair and skin covered with liver spots, men with big square hands and legs shaped like bowling pins.”
Apparently it got the job done. He cranked out eighty-five novels in twenty years and died at 51.
The cause? Too much work and caffeine, they like to say.
Other speculated causes of death include hypertension, atherosclerosis, and even syphilis.
via Honoré de Balzac Writes About “The Pleasures and Pains of Coffee,” and His Epic Coffee Addiction | Open Culture.

Moray Eel visits the Dentist.

The Dentist
Observing the interactions between deep sea marine life is a visual feast.
So many activities unfold in front of your eyes like this moray eel having its dental hygiene looked after by a cleaner shrimp.
Image Credit: Photograph by Lilian Koh, Singapore.
Member since 2018.
Source: Dentist | Smithsonian Photo Contest | Smithsonian