“The Creation of Volapük, a universal Language”.

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Johann Schleyer on a harp given to him as a 50th birthday present by his colleagues at Sionsharfe, a magazine devoted mainly to Catholic poetry, which Schleyer edited and in which he first published on Volapük in 1879 –
Johann Schleyer was a German priest whose irrational passion for umlauts may have been his undoing.
During one sleepless night in 1879, he felt a Divine presence telling him to create a universal language.
The result was Volapük. It was designed to be easy to learn, with a system of simple roots derived from European languages, and regular affixes which attached to the roots to make new words.
Volapük was the first invented language to gain widespread success.
By the end of the 1880s there were more than 200 Volapük societies and clubs around the world and 25 Volapük journals.
Over 1500 diplomas in Volapük had been awarded. In 1889, when the third international Volapük congress was held in Paris, the proceedings were entirely in Volapük.
Everyone had at least heard of it. President Grover Cleveland’s wife even named her dog Volapük.
Though Schleyer was German, a large part of the Volapük vocabulary was based on English.
“Volapük” was a compound formed from two roots, vol (from “world”) and pük (from “speak”).
However, it was often hard to spot the source of a Volapük word because of the way Schleyer had set up the sound system of the language.
“Paper” was pöp, “beer” bil, “proof” blöf and “love” löf. He had rational reasons for most of the phonological choices he made. For simplicity, he tried to limit all word roots to one syllable.
He avoided the ‘r’ sound, “for the sake of children and old people, also for some Asiatic nations.” The umlauts, however, were there for löf.
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The International Logo of the Organisation.
Read on further via Trüth, Beaüty, and Volapük | The Public Domain Review.

“Grey Matter(s) by Tom Jacobi'”

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Image Credit: Photographs by Tom Jacobi.
German photographer Tom Jacobi captures mystical, archaic landscapes in the grey world from dusk to dawn.
The photos look otherworldly—free from any color distractions in order to convey the calm, contemplative, and meditative qualities of these timeless locations.
For Grey Matter(s), Jacobi traveled over two years to six continents searching for archaic landscapes—North America, South America, Europe, Africa, Australia, and Antarctica—capturing indelible images of their distinct natural beauty and shaped over thousands of years by nature.
In art, there is a technique known as grisaille and Jacobi’s work could be described as photographic grisailles: tranquil scenes composed entirely of landscapes that are devoid of color.

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To capture this desaturated world, Jacobi photographed the landscapes as light shifted between day and night.
As twilight fell, he writes that the landscapes seemed “like mystical enactments from some other world.” Colors simply are reflected light, individually put together in our brain, a place also called “Grey Matter.” No light, no colors.

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By photographing our colorful world at times and places, where there is no color, the illusion of a colorful reality is being unmasked.
A coffee table book of this series is available through Amazon.

See more of Tom’s work via Grey Matter(s): Photos by Tom Jacobi

“In a Tangle.”

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Germany Daily Life
Red deer fighting during the rutting season at a wildlife park on a fall day in Bonn, Western Germany.
The rut is the mating season of ruminant animals such as deer, sheep, camels, goats, pronghorns, bison and Asian and African antelopes.
During the rut (also known as the rutting period males often rub their antlers or horns on trees or shrubs, fight with each other, wallow in mud or dust, self-anoint and herd in season females together.
Photograph taken on Thursday, 27 October, 2016.
Image Credit: AP Photo/Markus Schreiber
Source: Photos of the day — AP Images Spotlight

“Early Printing in Cologne”.

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Cologne’s location on the River Rhine placed it at the intersection of the major east-west trade routes and this was the basis of its wealth and power.
Besides its economic and political significance, Cologne also became an outstanding centre of medieval pilgrimage when Cologne’s archbishop gave the relics of The Three Wise Men to the Cathedral in 1164.
In the Middle Ages it was the most densely populated and one of the most prosperous towns in the German-speaking region, with an established university and membership of the Hansa alliance (Hanseatic League) of trading cities.
This economic association of towns and cities stretched from the Baltic to the North Sea and dominated trade along the coast of Northern Europe for centuries.
Trade fairs, which provided early printers with a market for their books, were an established feature of Cologne life.

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In the early 1470s William Caxton, the English Printer, spent time in Cologne learning the art of printing.
He returned to Bruges in 1472 where he and Colard Mansion, a Flemish calligrapher, set up a press.
Eventually Caxton set up his press in London.
Caxton’s own translation of ‘The Recuyell of the Histories of Troye’ was the first book printed in the English language.
via First Impressions | Cologne.

“Music on the Elbe.”

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The new Hamburg landmark “Elbphilharmonie” (Philharmonic Hall) along the Elbe river is illuminated during the opening of the new concert hall in Hamburg, Northern Germany.
Photographic Credit: REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer
See more images via Editor’s choice | Reuters.com

“Dead Calm.”

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Photograph by Gregor Thelen.
Just before dawn the sun rises over the Hintersee lake in the Berchtesgaden National Park, Germany.
The mist clears over the dead calm lake giving a mystic view of the mountains greeting the morning sun.
Like a land untouched by human hand the quietness and peace is tangible in the delicate shades and majestic nature rising from the night.
Source: Winter Sunrise Photo by Gregor Thelen — National Geographic Your Shot