The Quebec City I Love.

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Rue St. Louis – Photograph by Susan Seubert
Keith Bellows, Editor in Chief, National Geographic Travel
When I was growing up, Quebec City was something of an also-ran compared to Montreal, its brasher, more idiosyncratic sibling and my hometown. My family would often drive the 150 miles up the St. Lawrence River to Quebec City, and as a kid I recall coming away a little underwhelmed. I
t seemed so dutiful and reserved next to the “sin city,” as Montreal was known. Sure, Quebec City could lay claim to a marginally more storied history—symbolized by the star-shaped Citadelle and the once bloody Plains of Abraham, where the British and French clashed over control of what would become Canada. But next to Montreal it lacked panache.
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Notre-Dame de Quebec – Photograph by Susan Seubert
No more. These days the cities have reached a comfortable détente over which has the most to offer. They are simply different. Quebec City’s warren of cobblestone streets, hulking Fairmont Le Château Frontenac, and Upper and Lower Towns are backdrop to its francophone fashion shops, chansons echoing off centuries-old cut-stone buildings, and air heavy with thick Québécois accents—a combination that’s unique in all North America. The food has gone from pedestrian to a superbly traditional force of gustatory nature (many dishes draw on local ingredients).
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Raclette – Photograph by Susan Seubert
When it turned 400 years old in 2008, Quebec City also seemed to turn a corner. Now it is a truly modern city with old bones. My advice: Learn a little French, try it out on the residents, and you’ll enter a world where the locals will help you unlock the keys to street-level Old France.
See more via I Heart Quebec City — National Geographic.

NZ’s best mince and cheese Pie takes baker to historic Awards win.

Tauranga baker Patrick Lam has been crowned the King of Pies for a record seventh time.
Lam has picked up the 2019 Supreme Award at the NZ Supreme Pie Awards for his mince and cheese pie, which was the first pie filling he ever ate and which he has called his favourite.
Speaking the morning after the awards, having had just over an hour’s sleep, Lam said that his bakery, Gold Star in Tauranga, entered the competition each year “just to update ourselves and make sure our skills are up there.
Patrick Lam, New Zealand’s most-crowned NZ Supreme Pie Awards winner. Photo Credit: STUFF
Patrick Lam, added his thoughts, “To be honest its unbelievable that we could win the Award again,” he said. “It was a big surprise… We know the competition is really hard.”
Source: New Zealand’s best mince and cheese takes baker to historic Pie Awards win | Stuff.co.nz

Breakfast around the World.

Breakfast in Nepal
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NEPAL – “This is a Nepalese milk tea accompanied by a hot pot of spicy chana gravy, which is mainly chickpeas with curry. It’s a typical Nepalese breakfast in Chautara, Sindhupalchok, one of the areas worst affected by the 25 April earthquake and its aftershocks.
And it’s what I ate while I was there with the Action Against Hunger team. Despite the difficulties many people are still facing, including a lack of shelter and exposure to monsoons and aftershocks, they still find the resources to serve this humble but energetic food early in the morning.”
Breakfast in Thailand
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THAILAND – “Jok (Thai style rice porridge). This is one of the most popular breakfasts for Thai people.
You can do it at home because it’s easy to cook or just buy it at street stalls. They usually sell it in the morning or late at night.
Photograph: IamNaZza
Senegalese breakfast
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SENEGAL – “Breakfast in Kaolack Region near the IFAD project in Senegal composed of couscous, niebé (beans) and meat accompanied by water.”
Photograph: AgricultureAtWork
Read and see more via Breakfast around the world – gallery | Global Development Professionals Network | The Guardian.

Breakfast at the Weekly Market.

© Nguyen Huu Thong. All rights reserved.
The American Experience – 15th Annual Smithsonian.com Photo Contest.
Breakfast at the Weekly Market in northern Vietnam, people come to the weekly market to exchange goods and culture. They usually wake up very early to go to market and have breakfast here.
This photo is the Grand Prize winner of our 15th Annual Photo Contest.
Source: Breakfast at the Weekly Market | Smithsonian Photo Contest | Smithsonian

The Best Way to Wash Your Fruit and Veggies.

Image Credit: iStock/courtneyk
The produce aisle is one of the best places in a grocery store to ensure you’re stocking up on nutrient-rich foods that add fiber, increase satiety, and generally keep your body in working order.
But as we’ve previously explained, those grocery store water nozzles are mainly for theatrics, and to add a little bulk to vegetables sold by weight—not to clean your produce.To really make sure your vegetables are clean and free of bacteria before adding them to meals, you need to take action at home.
As The Washington Post’s Becky Krystal recently explained, it’s a little more involved than just running lettuce under the faucet.The first thing you want to do is wash your own hands.
It makes little sense to rinse vegetables if your handling of them just reintroduces germs. Then, wash your produce with plain water and gently rub the surface to dislodge any gunk.
If it’s a root vegetable, like a carrot, you probably want to use a stiff brush to attack the soil left behind.
For leafy greens, a water bath might be preferable to a spray wash. Tearing off the outer layer will get rid of a lot of bacteria, and the remaining debris in the inner layers will get dislodged after being submerged. (You might be surprised by the dirt left at the bottom of a water basin.) Five minutes is sufficient. To avoid serving soggy leaves or herbs, dry them with a towel or in a salad spinner.
It’s also a good idea to wash your produce just before you’re ready to prepare your meal, not right after you bring it home.
Washing and then refrigerating just leads to dampness that expedites spoilage. And yes, you should wash your fruit, or anything else with skin.
Even though apples and oranges are basically sealed, you don’t want any surface bacteria moving to the interior when cutting or peeling.
[h/t The Washington Post]
Source: The Best Way to Wash Your Fruits and Veggies | Mental Floss

Germs & early Ice Cream Street Vendors.

An ice cream vendor in New York hands a young girl an ice cream, circa 1920.

An ice cream vendor in New York hands a young girl an ice cream, circa 1920.
Image Credit: Elizabeth R. Hibbs/Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Before the tinny melody of “Pop Goes The Weasel” brought swarms of sweaty kids to the streets for an ice cream cone, mobile ice cream vendors used more primitive—and less sanitary—means.
In the late 19th century, vendors sold dishes of ice cream from carts cooled with ice blocks, which meant customers would lick their dish clean and then return it to the seller to use for his next customer. Not exactly a model of hygiene.
Before widespread milk pasteurization, ice cream also came topped with the threat of bacteria that could cause scarlet fever, tuberculosis, and other extreme ailments.
The frozen treat became safer to order after studies of typhoid in New York implicated raw milk, causing most cities to require pasteurization, and inventions like the ice cream cone made that whole sharing dishes issue disappear.
Technological advances around the same time made refrigeration easier and scoopers traded in their carts for cars.
Ice cream trucks, which first appeared in the 1920s, have seen something of a resurgence in recent years as other food trucks have flourished and anything vintage has become hipster cool, but the once-ubiquitous carts tend to remain relegated to zoos, amusement parks, and other touristy areas.
Source: 8 Summertime Treats We Should Bring Back | Mental Floss
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