Breakfast around the World.

Breakfast in Nepal
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NEPAL – “This is a Nepalese milk tea accompanied by a hot pot of spicy chana gravy, which is mainly chickpeas with curry. It’s a typical Nepalese breakfast in Chautara, Sindhupalchok, one of the areas worst affected by the 25 April earthquake and its aftershocks.
And it’s what I ate while I was there with the Action Against Hunger team. Despite the difficulties many people are still facing, including a lack of shelter and exposure to monsoons and aftershocks, they still find the resources to serve this humble but energetic food early in the morning.”
Breakfast in Thailand
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THAILAND – “Jok (Thai style rice porridge). This is one of the most popular breakfasts for Thai people.
You can do it at home because it’s easy to cook or just buy it at street stalls. They usually sell it in the morning or late at night.
Photograph: IamNaZza
Senegalese breakfast
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SENEGAL – “Breakfast in Kaolack Region near the IFAD project in Senegal composed of couscous, niebé (beans) and meat accompanied by water.”
Photograph: AgricultureAtWork
Read and see more via Breakfast around the world – gallery | Global Development Professionals Network | The Guardian.

The Sweet Mr. John Cadbury.

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John Cadbury (1802-1889) was born in Birmingham to Richard Tapper Cadbury, who was from a wealthy Quaker family that moved to the area from the west of England.
As a Quaker in the early 19th century, he was not allowed to enter a university, so could not pursue a profession such as medicine or law. As Quakers are pacifist, a military career was also out of the question.
So, like many other Quakers of the time, he turned his energies toward business and began a campaign against animal cruelty, forming the Animals Friend Society, a forerunner of the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.
Meanwhile, Cadbury’s manufacturing enterprise prospered, his brother David joined the business in 1848 and they rented a larger factory on Bridge Street.
Two years later, in 1850, the Cadbury brothers pulled out of the retail business, leaving it in the hands of John’s son, Richard Barrow Cadbury. (Barrow’s remained a leading Birmingham store until the 1960s.)
Benjamin and John Cadbury dissolved their partnership in 1860. John retired in 1861 due to the death of his wife, and his sons Richard and George succeeded him in the business. I
n 1879 they relocated to an area of what was then north Worcestershire, on the borders of the parishes of Northfield and King’s Norton centred on the Georgian built Bournbrook Hall, where they developed the garden village of Bournville; now a major suburb of Birmingham. The family developed the Cadbury’s factory, which remains a key site of Cadbury.
The district around the factory has been ‘dry’ for over 100 years, with no alcohol being sold in pubs, bars or shops. Residents have fought to maintain this, winning a court battle in March 2007 with Britain’s biggest supermarket chain Tesco, to prevent it selling alcohol in its local outlet.
Read on via John Cadbury – Wikipedia

“John Macadam’s Nuts”.

FeatureMacadamia nuts come from Australia, and the indigenous people there were eating them long before western botanists ever heard of them.
They’re named for a famous 19th century chemist/politician John Macadam, but he didn’t discover them or introduce them to the west.
His friend Ferdinand Von Mueller named them after him. That was after, as the story goes, Mueller sent the plant to be studied at the Botanical Gardens in Brisbane.

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John Macadam: The genus Macadamia (Macadamia nut) was named after him in 1857.
The director told a student to crack open the new nut for germination.
The student ate a few and said they were delicious.
After waiting to see whether or not the young man would die in the following days, the director tasted a few himself and declared Macadamias the finest nut to have ever existed.
via 12 Things You Didn’t Know Were Named After People | Mental Floss.

Coffee does NOT keep better in the fridge.

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Keeping your coffee cold won’t make it last longer.
Instead, it can create condensation and that moisture can affect your coffee’s taste.
The National Coffee Association says the best way to store coffee is in an airtight glass or ceramic container, somewhere dark and cool.
A cabinet near your stove or oven is usually too warm.
However, one study found that colder beans make for smaller, more evenly sized particles, which leads to more flavor when the beans are ground.
You can put your beans in the freezer, but be sure to keep them sealed air tight to avoid problems with moisture.
Source: Coffee keeps better in the fridge | 11 food rules you should ignore | MNN – Mother Nature Network

“Gerald’s Truck”.

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On a short-term assignment, I spent three months living in Mullins, South Carolina, a town of population 5,000. I grew to love the small town atmosphere where people’s histories go back to the days of “my great-great-great-granddaddy.”
Amongst the many South Carolinian traditions, there are certain specialties only known to the locals.
Point in case: Gerald’s famous ‘ice cream truck,’ where during lunchtime, you can go beyond the ice cream and get your true Southern eatin’ on.
Collard greens, mac ‘n cheese, candied yams, rice, and smothered pork chops galore with a dollop of Southern charm to match.
People like Gerald make small town Mullins big in heart.
 Photographer: Alice Yen
Alice Yen is an undergraduate at Duke University in Durham, NC and has conducted fieldwork research in southern Africa, the United Kingdom, rural areas of the United States, and most recently, central and southern Asia.
via The Best of Small Town America – Sixteen of the finest tiny towns in the United States. – Pictory.

“Behold, the Gingerbread House.”

All images courtesy the artist
An ambitious hobbyist, turned accomplished baker, turned cookbook author steps into her crafting niche by creating a decadent holiday castle.
Christine McConnell, expert baker and architecture-savvy aesthete, completes a massive, intricate gingerbread house. Putting in nearly 270 hours of work spread over 20 days, as well as pounds and pounds of icing, McConnell forms an edible chef d’ oeuvre without a single cardboard support in sight.
Fine-tuned with impeccable detail and realistic, epochal design, the creation towers over typical gingerbread houses with its castle-sized proportions and dark, romantic feel.
All of the ingredients required for the artistic creation include “simple stuff you can find at any grocery store,” McConnell shares. “This project was a huge undertaking for me.
I usually try to limit projects to two weeks, but I got so excited about this that I ended up getting a little carried away.”
“I love architecture,” she continues, “always have. When I was ten years old, I had a dream about a weird house and when I woke up, I had to build it out of cardboard and whatever else I could find, so I guess I’ve been fiddling with this sort of thing for a while.

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”Photographs of her edible creations are frequently complimented by the artist wearing her own glamorous fashion designs and deft photo-editing. The artist’s claim to fame bridges many talents, but she’s best known for fashioning astonishing baked goods.
Take a closer look at the gingerbread castle and small accessories, like a chocolate-peppermint reindeer cake and tiny porcupine brownies, which give the composition a new degree of artistry.
McConnell recently released a book of creepy-cute treats accompanied by recipes, entitled Deceptive Desserts.
Christine McConnell shares her recipe for creating your own gingerbread castle in Food.com’s feature of her.
Source: Behold, The Most Immaculate Gingerbread House Ever | The Creators Project