‘Flying Machines’ made from Cardboard.

agdag-3If you want to create detailed and imaginative flying machine sculptures that look like they’re about to take flight, cardboard is hardly the material to use.
Unless of course you’re artist Daniel Agdag, who has been toiling away creating a series of new works each more detailed and fascinating than the next.
“The Principles of Aerodynamics” is Agdag’s first solo exhibition where his series of cardboard contraptions that portray his “ongoing pursuit of escape through the metaphor of flight” will be on display.
As he’s done in the past, Agdag forfeits all blueprints, drawings and plans choosing, instead, to work only from mind and scalpel.
His industrial beasts–get close and you can almost smell the oil and smoke; hear the clanking and buzzing–come together only from sliced cardboard hinged with glue.
via Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag | Colossal.

Ghosts of Airships.

imageHangar One in 2007 (photograph by FlyingToaster/Wikimedia)
At Moffett Field in Mountain View, California, Hangar One looms as one of the world’s biggest freestanding buildings.
Built in the 1930s, it sprawls over eight acres, giving it, like the Goodyear Airdock, a distinct weather that sometimes includes hovering fog.
As a naval hangar, it housed the USS Macon — constructed at the Goodyear Airdock — but later became part of the NASA Ames Research Center.
However, it underwent a massive restoration recently due to hazardous substances that necessitated cleaning, and is now being being leased to Google’s Planetary Ventures.
Their plans include aviation projects along with robotic and space technology, potentially revitalizing the hangar for the next age of flight.z3
Construction of Hangar One in the 1930s (via NASA/Ames Research Center)
View of the USS Macon from Hangar One in 1934 (via US Navy)
via Ghosts of Airships: 7 Vestiges of the Great Helium Hope | Atlas Obscura.

Fog over San Francisco seen from above.

fog-fingers_lorenzomontezemolo_2048pxby Lorenzo Montezemolo
San Francisco genuinely is really foggy. It’s not a joke.
The fog rolls in from the Pacific and floats up against the beach, stacking up above Twin Peaks until it drops like an ephemeral avalanche onto the city below … blasting through the Golden Gate as if sprayed from a fire extinguisher, erasing the Bridge, obscuring Alcatraz, turning Berkeley into an overcast Pacific Northwest knockoff even as it leaves Oakland in bright, shining California sunlight.
Lorenzo Montezemolo’s favorite place to experience it is from Mount Tamalpais, which provides a commanding view from just north of the city.
Seen from the summit at 2,576 feet, the fog rolls through in waves to envelop the region like a shroud.
“I think there’s a little bit of Sleepy Hollow to it,” he says.
Montezemolo grew enamored by the city’s ubiquitous fog after moving the Bay Area 18 years ago to work as a network engineer. The fog was particularly thick this August, and he developed something of an obsession.
Each day after work, Montezemolo drove an hour north from San Mateo to Mount Tamalpais State Park to photograph it.
He snapped hundreds of photos, but none quite like this one, made on August 17 during the full moon.
He and a few friends hiked a steep gravel trail to a point about 1,000 feet above the fog.
Montezemolo put his Nikon D810 on tripod and set to work. He used an F8 aperture and a low ISO of 31, together with a six-stop neutral density filter that let him stretch the exposure to three minutes.
Montezemolo’s stunning image shows one of the Bay Area’s most enchanting features, one that rivals that iconic orange bridge for its beauty.
Source: San Francisco’s Iconic Fog Sure Looks Stunning From Above | WIRED

Amelia Earhart, flies solo across the Atlantic in 1932.

A Guardian photographic highlight:
On 21 May 1932, Amelia Earhart became the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic.
She had meant to fly to Paris but bad weather and mechanical problems forced her to land in a field near Londonderry, Ireland. “After scaring most of the cows in the neighborhood,” she said, “I pulled up in a farmer’s back yard.”

American aviator Amelia Earhart is surrounded by a crowd of wellwishers and pressmen while being congratulated on her solo flight in a Lockeed Vega by Andrew Mellon, United States ambassador to Britain.
Image Credit: Photograph by Topical Press Agency/Getty Images.
Source: Amelia Earhart – picture of the day | US news | The Guardian


Here’s a gallery of beautiful air vehicles of the past
Vintage Photos of Zeppelins in History (1)Pax, a colorful airship, constructed by a Brazilian inventor named Augusto Severo. The inventor was killed in Paris in 1902 when the airship rose steeply and exploded. (Photo by Henry Guttmann/Getty Images)
Vintage Photos of Zeppelins in History (10)
USS Los Angeles, upside down after a turbulent wind from the Atlantic, Lakehurst, New Jersey, 1926 (AP)
Vintage Photos of Zeppelins in History (15)R101, a British airship completed in 1929, crashed on 5 October 1930 in France during its very first overseas voyage. 48 of the 54 people were died on board.

via vintage everyday: aviation.

The Boeing 314 Clipper Flying Boat, 1938.

image002When the Boeing 314 flying boat made its appearance, it was the largest civil aircraft in service. 
The Yankee Clipper project dates back to 1935, with the start of a series of negotiations between Pan American World Airways and Boeing for the production of a flying-boat capable of guaranteeing transatlantic passenger flights with a high degree of safety, comfort and speed.
On July 21, 1936, Pan American signed a contract for six Model 314s, the first of which made its initial sea run on Puget Sound on May 31, 1938, and made its inaugural flight on June 7, 1938.
It outstripped all rivals in size, with twice the size of the Sikorsky S-42 and outweighed the Martin M-130 China Clipper by 15 tons. The 14-cylinder double-row Wright Cyclones were the first to use 100-octane fuel.
The Boeing 314 weighed 40 tons and the first block ordered cost $550,000 per aircraft.


It had a central hull and adopted the wing and engine assembly of the experimental Boeing XB-15 heavy bomber.
In the place of the traditional floating stabilizers at the wingtips, sponsons (flotation device)  mounted on the sides of the hull were used.
The sponsons were based on the formula developed by the German engineer Claude Dornier and incorporated into such aircraft as the Dornier Do X and Dornier Do 18.
The sponsons (flotation device) also contained fuel tanks, the capacity of which (together with those situated in the wings) totaled almost 3,525 gallons (16,000 liters).
Read more via Boeing 314 Clipper.