Tag Archives: Flight

Ghosts of Airships.

imageHangar One in 2007 (photograph by FlyingToaster/Wikimedia)
At Moffett Field in Mountain View, California, Hangar One looms as one of the world’s biggest freestanding buildings.
Built in the 1930s, it sprawls over eight acres, giving it, like the Goodyear Airdock, a distinct weather that sometimes includes hovering fog.
As a naval hangar, it housed the USS Macon — constructed at the Goodyear Airdock — but later became part of the NASA Ames Research Center.
However, it underwent a massive restoration recently due to hazardous substances that necessitated cleaning, and is now being being leased to Google’s Planetary Ventures.
Their plans include aviation projects along with robotic and space technology, potentially revitalizing the hangar for the next age of flight.z3
Construction of Hangar One in the 1930s (via NASA/Ames Research Center)
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View of the USS Macon from Hangar One in 1934 (via US Navy)
via Ghosts of Airships: 7 Vestiges of the Great Helium Hope | Atlas Obscura.

‘Flying Machines’ made from Cardboard.

agdag-3If you want to create detailed and imaginative flying machine sculptures that look like they’re about to take flight, cardboard is hardly the material to use.
Unless of course you’re artist Daniel Agdag, who has been toiling away creating a series of new works each more detailed and fascinating than the next.
“The Principles of Aerodynamics” is Agdag’s first solo exhibition where his series of cardboard contraptions that portray his “ongoing pursuit of escape through the metaphor of flight” will be on display.
As he’s done in the past, Agdag forfeits all blueprints, drawings and plans choosing, instead, to work only from mind and scalpel.
His industrial beasts–get close and you can almost smell the oil and smoke; hear the clanking and buzzing–come together only from sliced cardboard hinged with glue.
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via Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag | Colossal.

The Flying Bum, Bedfordshire.

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Full of gas: The world’s longest aircraft – part airship, plane and helicopter – has been unveiled in Cardington, Bedfordshire.
It will be used for surveillance and aid missions… and resembles something very familiar. The 300ft-long ‘airship’ unveiled in Britain is the world’s longest aircraft.
Known as the HAV304, aircraft is being displayed at a Hangar in Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.
It is 302ft (91m) long making it 60ft (18m) longer than the biggest airliners.
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It can stay in the air for 3 weeks and will be vital to delivering humanitarian aid.
Its funders include Iron Maiden singer Bruce Dickinson.
The aircraft is 70 per cent more environmentally friendly than a cargo plane and doesn’t need a runway to take off.
via HAV304 300ft-long ‘airship’ unveiled in Britain is world’s longest aircraft | Mail Online.

Hercules C1030J training over Oxfordshire.

Current equipment category, second place. A C130J Hercules taking part in a training sortie over Abingdon, Oxfordshire.
Photograph: Cpl Matty Matthews/RAF
Source: Royal Air Force photographic competition 2019 – in pictures | UK news | The Guardian

Fog over San Francisco.

fog-fingers_lorenzomontezemolo_2048pxby Lorenzo Montezemolo
San Francisco genuinely is really foggy. It’s not a joke.
The fog rolls in from the Pacific and floats up against the beach, stacking up above Twin Peaks until it drops like an ephemeral avalanche onto the city below … blasting through the Golden Gate as if sprayed from a fire extinguisher, erasing the Bridge, obscuring Alcatraz, turning Berkeley into an overcast Pacific Northwest knockoff even as it leaves Oakland in bright, shining California sunlight.
Lorenzo Montezemolo’s favorite place to experience it is from Mount Tamalpais, which provides a commanding view from just north of the city.
Seen from the summit at 2,576 feet, the fog rolls through in waves to envelop the region like a shroud.
“I think there’s a little bit of Sleepy Hollow to it,” he says.
Montezemolo grew enamored by the city’s ubiquitous fog after moving the Bay Area 18 years ago to work as a network engineer. The fog was particularly thick this August, and he developed something of an obsession.
Each day after work, Montezemolo drove an hour north from San Mateo to Mount Tamalpais State Park to photograph it.
He snapped hundreds of photos, but none quite like this one, made on August 17 during the full moon.
He and a few friends hiked a steep gravel trail to a point about 1,000 feet above the fog.
Montezemolo put his Nikon D810 on tripod and set to work. He used an F8 aperture and a low ISO of 31, together with a six-stop neutral density filter that let him stretch the exposure to three minutes.
Montezemolo’s stunning image shows one of the Bay Area’s most enchanting features, one that rivals that iconic orange bridge for its beauty.
Source: San Francisco’s Iconic Fog Sure Looks Stunning From Above | WIRED

Among The Clouds, Abu Dhabi.

Image Credit: Photograph by Khalid Al Hammadi
The Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque in the United Arab Emirates conjures up memories of Fairy tale stories such as Sinbad the Sailor and Aladdin.
That was the first impression that came to my mind when I was there taking this photo, the view was incredible, a perfect structure with an amazing huge wave of fog surrounding it.
I wish that all of you were there with me, standing together, and enjoying this beautiful view, one where nature embraces architecture.
Source: Among The Clouds Photo by Khalid Al Hammadi — National Geographic Your Shot

The Triplane Monster Plane, 1921.

A short article on a very big topic appeared in Illustrated World in June 1921.
The photo showed a remarkable plane constructed by aeronautical engineer Giovanni Caproni (1886-1957)–three planes, really.
Three triplanes were attached to a floating Pullman-like fuselage, making this the largest and heaviest aircraft ever built at that time.
It was 32′ high, 66′ long, and 130′ wide, and was made to seat 100 and make a transatlantic voyage.
This was the “Noviplano” (the Caproni Ca. 6c, and translated in the article as “Nine-plannen”), and presented itself in an impressive if not complicated manner–it was a prototype, though, and was crashed and finished on its second flight.
Posted by John F. Ptak in Aviation & flight, Technology, History of,
Source: JF Ptak Science Books: Tri-Triplane Monster Plane (1921)

The Montgolfier Bros and Manned Flight, 1783

A model of the Montgolfier brothers’ balloon at the London Science Museum.
The brothers Joseph-Michel and Jacques-Étienne Montgolfier developed a hot air balloon in Annonay, Ardeche, France, and demonstrated it publicly on September 19, 1783, making an unmanned flight lasting 10 minutes.
After experimenting with unmanned balloons and flights with animals, the first balloon flight with humans aboard, a tethered flight, performed on or around October 15, 1783, by Jean-Francois pilatre de Rozier who made at least one tethered flight from the yard of the Reveillon workshop in the Faubourg Saint-Antoine.
Later that same day, Pilatre de Rozier became the second human to ascend into the air, reaching an altitude of 26 m (85 ft), the length of the tether.
The first free flight with human passengers was made a few weeks later, on November 21, 1783.
King Louis XVI had originally decreed that condemned criminals would be the first pilots, but de Rozier, along with Marquis François d’Arlandes, petitioned successfully for the honor.
The first military use of a hot air balloon happened in 1794 during the battle of Fleurus, when the French used the balloon for observation.
Source: Hot air balloon | encyclopedia article by TheFreeDictionary

Airships from the Past.

Here’s a gallery of beautiful air vehicles of the past
Vintage Photos of Zeppelins in History (1)Pax, a colorful airship, constructed by a Brazilian inventor named Augusto Severo. The inventor was killed in Paris in 1902 when the airship rose steeply and exploded. (Photo by Henry Guttmann/Getty Images)
Vintage Photos of Zeppelins in History (10)
USS Los Angeles, upside down after a turbulent wind from the Atlantic, Lakehurst, New Jersey, 1926 (AP)
Vintage Photos of Zeppelins in History (15)R101, a British airship completed in 1929, crashed on 5 October 1930 in France during its very first overseas voyage. 48 of the 54 people were died on board.

via vintage everyday: aviation.

Amelia Earhart, first woman to fly Atlantic.

A Guardian photographic highlight:
On 21 May 1932, Amelia Earhart became the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic.
She had meant to fly to Paris but bad weather and mechanical problems forced her to land in a field near Londonderry, Ireland. “After scaring most of the cows in the neighborhood,” she said, “I pulled up in a farmer’s back yard.”

American aviator Amelia Earhart is surrounded by a crowd of wellwishers and pressmen while being congratulated on her solo flight in a Lockeed Vega by Andrew Mellon, United States ambassador to Britain.
Image Credit: Photograph by Topical Press Agency/Getty Images.
Source: Amelia Earhart – picture of the day | US news | The Guardian