The Flying Bum, Bedfordshire.

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Full of gas: The world’s longest aircraft – part airship, plane and helicopter – has been unveiled in Cardington, Bedfordshire.
It will be used for surveillance and aid missions… and resembles something very familiar. The 300ft-long ‘airship’ unveiled in Britain is the world’s longest aircraft.
Known as the HAV304, aircraft is being displayed at a Hangar in Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.
It is 302ft (91m) long making it 60ft (18m) longer than the biggest airliners.
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It can stay in the air for 3 weeks and will be vital to delivering humanitarian aid.
Its funders include Iron Maiden singer Bruce Dickinson.
The aircraft is 70 per cent more environmentally friendly than a cargo plane and doesn’t need a runway to take off.
via HAV304 300ft-long ‘airship’ unveiled in Britain is world’s longest aircraft | Mail Online.

Airship R33, Selby, England, 1919.

pervaya-mirovaya-vojna-3-24-990x718An observer in the tail tip of the English airship R33 on March 6, 1919 in Selby, England. (Bibliotheque nationale de France)
World War I was the first major conflict to see widespread use of powered aircraft — invented barely more than a decade before the fighting began.
Airplanes, along with kites, tethered balloons, and zeppelins gave all major armies a new tactical platform to observe and attack enemy forces from above.

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via vintage everyday.

The Giffard Dirigible, France 1852.

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The Giffard Dirigible, flying from Paris to Trappes, 1852.
In France, an engineer named Henri Giffard (1825-82) was leading the way in les ballons dirigeable, French for directable balloons, and from which English adapted the word dirigible.
In 1852, Giffard’s airship made the first recorded successful powered and steerable flight.
The intrepid inventor flew his machine from the Paris Hippodrome to Trappes, a distance of 17 miles (27 km), in roughly 3 hours. The craft proved manoeuvrable, making many navigational turns and performing circles, but the engine wasn’t powerful enough to fly against the wind and failed to make a return journey.
The balloon was 144 feet long (44 m), hydrogen filled, and highly flammable, so the engine exhaust was diverted downwards by a long pipe.
The engine produced 3 hp, drove a propeller, and top speed of the dirigible was 6 mph (9 km).
via Incredible Victorian Inventions & the Roots of Steampunk | Kate Tattersall Adventures.

Among The Clouds, Abu Dhabi.

Image Credit: Photograph by Khalid Al Hammadi
The Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque in the United Arab Emirates conjures up memories of Fairy tale stories such as Sinbad the Sailor and Aladdin.
That was the first impression that came to my mind when I was there taking this photo, the view was incredible, a perfect structure with an amazing huge wave of fog surrounding it.
I wish that all of you were there with me, standing together, and enjoying this beautiful view, one where nature embraces architecture.
Source: Among The Clouds Photo by Khalid Al Hammadi — National Geographic Your Shot

‘Flying Machines’ made from Cardboard.

agdag-3If you want to create detailed and imaginative flying machine sculptures that look like they’re about to take flight, cardboard is hardly the material to use.
Unless of course you’re artist Daniel Agdag, who has been toiling away creating a series of new works each more detailed and fascinating than the next.
“The Principles of Aerodynamics” is Agdag’s first solo exhibition where his series of cardboard contraptions that portray his “ongoing pursuit of escape through the metaphor of flight” will be on display.
As he’s done in the past, Agdag forfeits all blueprints, drawings and plans choosing, instead, to work only from mind and scalpel.
His industrial beasts–get close and you can almost smell the oil and smoke; hear the clanking and buzzing–come together only from sliced cardboard hinged with glue.
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via Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag | Colossal.

Ghosts of Airships.

imageHangar One in 2007 (photograph by FlyingToaster/Wikimedia)
At Moffett Field in Mountain View, California, Hangar One looms as one of the world’s biggest freestanding buildings.
Built in the 1930s, it sprawls over eight acres, giving it, like the Goodyear Airdock, a distinct weather that sometimes includes hovering fog.
As a naval hangar, it housed the USS Macon — constructed at the Goodyear Airdock — but later became part of the NASA Ames Research Center.
However, it underwent a massive restoration recently due to hazardous substances that necessitated cleaning, and is now being being leased to Google’s Planetary Ventures.
Their plans include aviation projects along with robotic and space technology, potentially revitalizing the hangar for the next age of flight.z3
Construction of Hangar One in the 1930s (via NASA/Ames Research Center)
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View of the USS Macon from Hangar One in 1934 (via US Navy)
via Ghosts of Airships: 7 Vestiges of the Great Helium Hope | Atlas Obscura.