Siamese Fighting Fish, Thailand.

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Bangkok-based photographer Visarute Angkatavanich (previously) continues to capture some of the most elegant portraits of fish we’ve seen.
His intimate, crystal-clear photos of Siamese fighting fish (betta) make it seem as though they are suspended in air instead of water.
Angkatavanich recently told Popular Photography that he only started photographing the fish after encountering them for the first time three years ago at a fish show and has since become obsessed with the different species which vary greatly in size, shape, and color patterns.
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Limited edition prints of his work are now available through La Lanta Fine Art.
via Stunning New Portraits of Siamese Fighting Fish by Visarute Angkatavanich | Colossal.

Catching Shrimp in the Morning Dew, Vietnam.

Image Credit: Photograph by Quoc Loc.
Livelihoods in the morning dew
A farmer can be seen catching shrimp in the morning dew on Quan Son lagoon, a district of Hanoi in the Red River Delta region of Vietnam.
Each day, she can catch up to two baskets of shrimp, and each basket can be sold for just two American dollars..
Source: Livelihoods in the morning dew Photo by Quoc Loc — National Geographic Your Shot

The mysterious Greenland Shark.

shark_loresThey can be as big as great white sharks, but that’s about as far as the comparison goes.
Their maximum speed is a lethargic 1.7 miles per hour, many are almost blind, and they are happy to eat rotting carcasses.
They may be common throughout the ocean, but you’ve probably never heard of them. Meet the Greenland shark.
Looking like nothing so much as a chunk of weather-beaten rock, Greenland sharks (Somniosus microcephalus) can grow up to 7.3 metres (24 feet) long, making them one of the largest of all fish, and the biggest in the Arctic.
But they prefer to live in deep, cold water, so humans rarely see them.
Studies in the Arctic have revealed a few snippets of information about Greenland sharks, and more data is now starting to come in from elsewhere.
It turns out that Greenland sharks are bizarre, and may be crucially important for the ocean ecosystem.
Greenland sharks only come close to the surface in places where the shallow water is frigid enough for them – primarily in the Arctic.
Read on via BBC – Earth – Mysterious giant sharks may be everywhere.

The Red Handfish.

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THIS IS ONE fish that will always be caught red-handed. Ok, bad pun, but it is an interesting fish.
Endemic to Tasmania’s eastern coast, the red handfish is so named because of its apparent use of its fins as hands, even using a type of walking motion on the seafloor.
It’s a benthic fish, preferring to hang around the sandy and rocky bottoms of the seafloor. They’ve been observed eating small crustaceans and worms.
There are two colour varieties – one with red embellishments (seen in the image above) and the other a right red all over. It grows from about 6cm to about 13.5cm long.
The red handfish was first discovered in the 1800s around Port Arthur.
In the 1980s a small population was found on the Actaeon Islands, south of Hobart, and the biggest population to date was found on a reef off Primrose Sands around Hobart (10 individuals) in the 1990s.
However, in a survey in 2005, no handfish were found in those areas.
They may be hanging on, because in 2010, three individuals were found in the Primrose Sands location.
Though the species hasn’t had a full, systematic survey of its numbers, it seems that populations are few and far between, and there’s likely to be not more than 1000 individuals in the wild, and likely only hundreds.
The red handfish was known as the Brachionichthys politus, but in 2009, it was re-categorised as Thymichthys politus.
Threats to red handfish include poaching for use as pets. Its low reproductive rate and low dispersal rate make is a challenge for the species’ survival. Fragmentation of the populations is also a challenge for reproductive success.
via Red handfish Thymichthys politus – Australian Geographic.

Pics of Tetradons and Diodons circa 1838–42.

These wonderful drawings of balloonfish and pufferfish were made during, or shortly after, the United States Exploring Expedition, 1838-1842.
Known as “U.S. Ex. Ex.” for short, or the “Wilkes Expedition” after its commanding officer Charles Wilkes, the exploratory voyage traveled the Pacific Ocean and collected more than 60,000 plant and bird specimens and the seeds of 648 species.
This sheer volume of data collected was of major importance to the growth of science in the United States, in particular the emerging field of oceanography.
Accompanying the naval officers and the many scientists were two artists, Joseph Drayton and Alfred Agate, who are behind the images presented here, along with a man named John Richard who was hired upon the expedition’s return to prepare the illustrative plates for the work on ichthyology.

According to the Smithsonian Institution Archives, which house the works, this particular set of images didn’t quite make the grade, however, as they were found in envelopes marked as “rejected” or “rejected for publication”.
Source: Housed at: Biodiversity Heritage Library | From: Smithsonian Institution Archives
See more via Drawings of Tetradons and Diodons (ca. 1838–42) – The Public Domain Review

Fishermen on the River Li, China.

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Image Credit: Photograph by David Paul Elliott
Fishermen on the river Li in China.
These boatmen participate in an illuminated display, for tourists, which takes place as evening comes.
The visual effect is stunning.
See more great images via Readers’ travel photography competition: September – in pictures | Travel | The Guardian