Catching Shrimp in the Morning Dew, Hanoi, Vietnam.

Image Credit: Photograph by Quoc Loc.
Livelihoods in the morning dew
A farmer can be seen catching shrimp in the morning dew on Quan Son lagoon, a district of Hanoi in the Red River Delta region of Vietnam.
Each day, she can catch up to two baskets of shrimp, and each basket can be sold for just two American dollars..
Source: Livelihoods in the morning dew Photo by Quoc Loc — National Geographic Your Shot

“Swimming With Giants.”

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From the dark, chilly waters they materialized—massive beings with large eyes that I knew were watching my every move from deep below long before I ever saw them.
The fish were nearly 10 feet in length and several feet thick, weighing around 1,000 pounds, and moved unlike anything else I had seen underwater.
Spinning around in circles I would see them rocket up from the depths, turn on a dime while flashing colors, then disappear back into the gloom. At least a dozen of them swam around me, and I scanned all axes trying to follow their movements. As they passed by I rolled in the wake of their mighty bulk.
Mesmerized by this fluid scene, I forced myself out of the trance I was in and began making pictures, but just kept repeating over and over in my head, “these are perfect oceanic creatures.”
They were the creatures that had haunted my dreams and stirred my soul. Feeling at times like Ahab, I’d pursued these animals for almost two decades; a quest not to capture, but to photograph.
And finally, I was here, on assignment for National Geographic magazine, tasked with bringing back images of these elusive and enigmatic beasts. I was in the northern realm of the last of the giants.
I was swimming with Atlantic bluefin tuna.
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Read on via Brian Skerry: Swimming With Giants | PROOF.

The mysterious Greenland Shark, Arctic Zone.

shark_loresThey can be as big as great white sharks, but that’s about as far as the comparison goes.
Their maximum speed is a lethargic 1.7 miles per hour, many are almost blind, and they are happy to eat rotting carcasses.
They may be common throughout the ocean, but you’ve probably never heard of them. Meet the Greenland shark.
Looking like nothing so much as a chunk of weather-beaten rock, Greenland sharks (Somniosus microcephalus) can grow up to 7.3 metres (24 feet) long, making them one of the largest of all fish, and the biggest in the Arctic.
But they prefer to live in deep, cold water, so humans rarely see them.
Studies in the Arctic have revealed a few snippets of information about Greenland sharks, and more data is now starting to come in from elsewhere.
It turns out that Greenland sharks are bizarre, and may be crucially important for the ocean ecosystem.
Greenland sharks only come close to the surface in places where the shallow water is frigid enough for them – primarily in the Arctic.
Read on via BBC – Earth – Mysterious giant sharks may be everywhere.

The Elaborate Fins of the Ribbonfish.

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Fins with transparent membranes give the ribbonfish its name. Image Credit: Joshua Lambus.
Up to 2m long the ribbonfish is an elegant deep-sea creature.
Named for the elaborate fins that ripple delicately after them as they swim, ribbonfish from the genus Trachipterus are found all over the world.
There are six known species, and Australia’s is the southern ribbonfish, a 2m-long silvery creature with black polka dots on its sides and bright red fins.
Found off the coast of southern Queensland and South Australia, the southern ribbonfish has also set up a population off the coast of South Africa.
This fish is pretty much a taxonomic nightmare, because while it’s certainly a single species, according to the Australian Museum no one can decide whether its correct scientific name is T. jacksonensis or T. arawatae.
Read more via Ribbonfish elaborate fins – Australian Geographic.

How the Poisonous Stone Fish Kills Humans.

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The stone fish is the most poisonous fish in the sea and one of the most dangerous in the world.
It can easily kill you if you step on it, injecting its venom deep inside your foot.
If not treated promptly, the poison will kill you.
If you are in Australia, watch out for these fellows.
They would be underwater, hiding under the sand or camouflaged over rocks, but also outside water, where they can survive for 24 hours.
Apparently, stone fish antivenom is the second-most administered in Australia.
Read on via How the most poisonous fish on Earth can kill humans.

The beautiful Achilles Tang.

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Achilles Tang – Photograph by Brian Skerry, National Geographic
In other places around the world, coral has been decimated by bleaching and disease, but the southern Line Islands’ reefs retain their resilience.
Scientists believe the key to coral health is intact ecosystems, where all the native species—including planktivores such as the vividly marked Achilles tang seen here—play their part.
The Achilles tang is one of the most spectacular fish available for the aquarium, but it is also one of the most difficult to keep.
This fish swims continuously, and usually at a very high speed, so it requires a large tank with plenty of open space.
It also requires fairly turbulent water movement.
When kept in conditions of less-than-ideal water movement and/or in too small a tank, this fish will be very nervous, usually not feed, and wither and die fairly quickly.
It is usually fairly expensive, so this may help prevent hobbyists with less-than-ideal conditions from keeping this fish.
via Achilles Tang Picture — Line Islands Photo — National Geographic Photo of the Day.