Funky Platform Shoes – the Past.

225025_LargeDo you remember the ultra funky platform shoes that were all the rage in the 1970s?
After their use in Ancient Greece for raising the height of important characters in the Greek theatre and their similar use by high-born prostitutes or courtesans in Venice in the 16th Century, platform shoes are thought to have been worn in Europe in the 18th century to avoid the muck of urban streets.
During the Qing dynasty, aristocrat Manchu women wore a form of platform shoe similar to 16th century Venetian chopine.
Platform shoes enjoyed some popularity in the United States, Europe and the UK in the 1930s, 1940s, and very early 1950s, but not nearly to the extent of their popularity in the 1970s and 1980s.
When the biggest, and most prolonged, platform shoe fad in U.S. history began at least as early as 1970 (appearing in both advertisements and articles in 1970 issues of Seventeen magazine), and continued through the late-1980s though not in Europe or the UK where they had all but died out by 1979.
At the beginning of the fad, they were worn primarily by young women in their teens and twenties, and occasionally by younger girls, older women, and (particularly during the disco era) by young men, and although they did provide added height without nearly the discomfort of spike heels, they seem to have been worn primarily for the sake of attracting attention.
Many glam rock musicians wore platform shoes as part of their act.

Sassy Ladies, 1970s

While a wide variety of styles were popular during this period, including boots, espadrilles, oxfords, sneakers, and both dressy and casual sandals of all description, with soles made of wood, cork, or synthetic materials, the most popular style of the early 1970s was a simple quarter-strap sandal with light tan water buffalo-hide straps (which darkened with age), on a beige suede-wrapped cork wedge-heel platform sole.
These were originally introduced under the brand name, “Kork-Ease.”
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The Early Hair Dryers from Hell, c.1930s.

Before the invention of hair dryers, women would often attach hoses to the exhaust ends of vacuum cleaners to blow-dry their hair.
vintage hair dryers (1)A woman sits under a chrome-plated hair dryer, 1928. (Keystone-France/Getty Images)c. vintage hair dryers (2)
1928 (Corbis)
vintage hair dryers (3)
A stylist uses a freestanding dryer to blow dry a client’s hair with controlled precision at the Hairdressing Fair of Fashion in London, 1929. (Puttnam /Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

The girl using a heat lamp and hairdrier made of hot glass. (Photo by Ralph Royle/Pix Inc./The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)

See more Images vintage everyday: Vintage Beauty Salons – Hilarious Photos of the Early Hair Dryers from between the 1920s and 1940s

The Beautiful and Charismatic Lilli Langtry.

Lillie Langtry was beautiful, smart, had wit and passion all  in one mesmerizing package.
Langtry was a stage actress persuaded to go into the acting business by famed writer and poet Oscar Wilde.
As her popularity grew, more people started to gravitate towards Langtry, because of her charisma and undeniable beauty.
Whenever she entered the room at a party, all eyes were on her.
Without even asking for permission, people were drawing and painting portraits of Langtry, which quickly became postcard favourites.
But it took more than just looks for Langtry to catch the eye of Albert Edward, the Prince of Wales and later King of the United Kingdom.
Around 1877, Langtry became the semi-official mistress of the Prince because, back then, those sorts of things happened.
She wasn’t just arm-candy, of course, and often reportedly engaged Albert in meaningful conversations, and delighted him with her wit.
Even more amazingly, she is said to have had a pretty good relationship with the Prince’s wife.
Read and see more via vintage everyday: Top 10 Famous Beauties of the 19th Century

Vintage Pics of Strange Beauty Devices, 1920s-40s.

Pictures below describe how terrible beauty care procedures looked like in the 1930s and 1940s.
Women now must be happy they don’t have to spend many hours sitting under strange devices or put weird things on their faces.Unusual and Bizarre Beauty Devices in the 1930s and 1940s (1)
Permanent hair procedure. Germany, 1929
Unusual and Bizarre Beauty Devices in the 1930s and 1940s (2)
Blow-drying, 1920s.
See more Images via vintage everyday: 15 Unusual and Bizarre Beauty Devices in the 1930s and 1940s.

Amazing Photos of Models in Castles & Mansions by Miss Aniela.

“Swan Lake” (2014), all images © Natalie Lennard
Photographer Natalie Lennard, who works as Miss Aniela, creates lavish scenes centered around elegantly dressed models. While each image might seem, at first glance, like a straightforward luxury fashion shoot, further inspection reveals surreal details.
A canary yellow tulle gown morphs into birds, and ocean water splashes out of a painting frame.Miss Aniela’s fantastical scenes are created using a combination of on-site shoots with practical effects, along with extensive post-production.
The photographer explains that all images are shot on location with the model posed and lit in-frame. “Sometimes I do not know whether the image will be largely ‘raw’ and not require overt surrealism added,” Aniela shares, “until I go through the process to feel what is right for each piece.”The U.K.-based artist has been working as a fine art photographer for 13 years, getting her start with self-portraits as a university student.
In some works, she incorporates direct references to paintings from the art historical canon. Aniela has been working in her current style since 2011, and shares with Colossal that she has noticed a rising interest in her work from art collectors, as the lines between fine art and fashion are increasingly blurred.
“What He Bequeathed” (2016)
Source: Fantastical Photographs of Opulently Dressed Models in Castles and Mansions | Colossal