Vintage Swimwear 1940s-1950s.

The mid to late 1940s was a breakthrough period for women’s swimwear, and at its peak was the birth of the pacesetting Bikini in 1946.
And it really boomed in the 1950s.
A postcard set of 69 women in swimsuits from the 1940s and 1950s will bring to you a clearer view.

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See more swimwear via vintage everyday: Vintage Swimwear Revisited – 69 Glamorous Postcards Show Women Swimsuits in the 1940s and ’50s

Fashion by Edward Steichen.

Fashion Photography by Edward Steichen in the 1920s and 1930s (2)

English stage actress Mary Taylor, 1933
As chief photographer for Vogue and Vanity Fair, Edward Steichen profoundly shaped the look of celebrity and fashion photography in the 1920s and 1930s.
Fashion Photography by Edward Steichen in the 1920s and 1930s (4)
 Chanel cocktail dress, Vogue May 1926
He immortalized leading writers, artists, actors, dancers and politicians in striking portraits.
Fashion photography was revolutionized when he began depicting the creations of all the great designers of the age.
Fashion Photography by Edward Steichen in the 1920s and 1930s (5)
Two models on the deck of the cruise ship liner Lurline, 1934
See more great Images via Vintage Everyday,
http://goo.gl/swNLoz

Coco Chanel at Work in Paris.

5760A new book featuring images of Coco Chanel by the photographer Douglas Kirkland provides a unique insight into the woman who transformed fashion.
Sent to Paris on assignment for Look magazine in 1962, Kirkland ended up living with Chanel for three weeks, and captured her as never before,
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All images from: Coco Chanel: Three Weeks/1962 by Douglas Kirkland, © 2008, published by Glitterai.
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See more via Coco Chanel: new images of the legendary designer – in pictures | Fashion | The Guardian.

Stylish Dressers from Yesteryear.

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Fashion goes round in circles.
At least to a certain extent, the fashions of the past will become the fashions of the future.

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When we look back to photos of the post-war era of 1940-1960, all we see is classy people that definitely knew how to dress.

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Source: vintage everyday: 50 Vintage Fashion Photos That Reveal Just How Awesome People Used To Dress

Woman in a Blaze of Colour.

Image Credit: Photograph by Stanislav Shmelev, Winner of Competition.
Photographers Comment: I took this picture of a woman in her traditional clothing in Cartagena, Colombia.
Comment from Paul Goldstein, Judge: The blaze of colour from every angle, the boldness of the picture, taken from behind, which gives it so much more allure and frankly a superb get up.
Did I mention the colours?
Oh, and that looks suspiciously like a Nokia.
Source: Readers’ travel photography competition: March – the winners | Travel | The Guardian

Dressing to the Nines.

tophats_0007Meaning: Dressed flamboyantly or smartly.
Origin
Nine is the most troublesome number in etymology. There are several phrases of uncertain parentage that include the word.
Examples are, cloud nine, nine days’ wonder and the infamous whole nine yards. We can add ‘dressed to the nines’ to that list.
Dressed to the nines
The most frequently heard attempts to explain the phrase’s derivation involve associating the number nine with clothing in some way.
One theory has it that tailors used nine yards of material to make a suit (or, according to some authors, a shirt).
The more material you had the more kudos you accrued, although nine yards seems generous even for a fop.
Another commonly repeated explanation comes from the exquisitely smart uniforms of the 99th (Lanarkshire) Regiment of Foot, which was raised in 1824.

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The problem with these explanations is that they come with no evidence to support them, apart from a reference to the number nine (or 99, which seems to be stretching the cloth rather thinly).
The regiment was in business in the early 19th century, which is at least the right sort of date for a phrase that became widely used in the middle of that century.
The first example of the use of the phrase that I can find in print is in Samuel Fallows’ The Progressive Dictionary of the English Language, 1835.
In his entry for the phrase ‘to the nines’ Fallows gives the example ‘dressed up to the nines’ and suggests that it “may perhaps” be derived from ‘to thine eynes’ – to the eyes.
Not bad as a hypothesis, but without any evidence (and I can find none) ‘may perhaps’ is as far as we can go with that.
What counts against the above explanations, and indeed against any of the supposed explanations that attempt to link the number nine to some property of clothing, is the prior use of the shorter phrase ‘to the nine’ or ‘to the nines’, which was used to indicate perfection, the highest standards.
Read more via Dressed to the nines.