Canadian Geese enjoy the late morning in Wetlands.

Your Shot photographer Scott Summers captured this image of some Canadian Geese enjoying the wetlands of Canastota, New York.
“The only sound throughout the swamp on this late spring morning were three geese honking at one another,” writes Your Shot photographer Scott Summers.
“They gathered at the head of the lake, where a fog bank rolled in just as the sun peeked over the trees to wrap the area in an ethereal glow. As I watched, the goose in the center of the trio pivoted toward the sun and, as if in greeting, arched out of the water and flapped its wings.”
Image Credit: Photograph by Scott Summers
Source: Editors’ Spotlight — National Geographic Your Shot

Hawaii was thought to be a Utopia in the1900s.

In the public consciousness at least, Hawaii has probably not changed too much in the past 100 years.
By this I mean an island chain of magnificent tropical beauty, mystery, and earthly delights with a strong emphasis on the natural world being the preferred vision for this place for many of us; with the realities of crime, squalor and all the other maladies undoubtedly present on some scale cast aside for the sake of bliss.
You see, in this chaotic world, people need and want to believe utopia by the name Hawaii must exist.
1-outrigger-canoe Detail: A.R. Gurrey Jr., American: “In measured tones subdued and low…” ca. 1910-20: vintage gelatin silver print from leaf included in volume “Idyls of Hawaii” (10.2 x 11.6 | 25.0 x 19.8 cm) Native Hawaiians are seen steering an outrigger canoe, possibly on Kaneohe Bay off the coast of Oʻahu. : From: PhotoSeed Archive
3-diamond-headDetail: A.R. Gurrey Jr., American: “Old ocean singing a psalm of delight…” (ocean view of Diamond Head in silhouette) ca. 1910-20: vintage gelatin silver print from leaf included in volume “Idyls of Hawaii” (7.8 x 11.5 | 25.0 x 19.8 cm) : From: PhotoSeed Archive
Source: The Idea of Hawaii | PhotoSeed

‘Haunting Portraits’ by Leslie Ann O’Dell.

b43523d5f735fb6f2eff73793c15a7fdc7daca53_660The ethereal beauties of Leslie Ann O’Dell’s artwork have a quality about them that is both soft yet somehow dark.
The colours fade onto the page, all except for the bold splashes of red that appear a bit disconcertingly like blood.
The artist explores concepts like isolation and the ego, offering surprisingly telling portraits that seem to unfold a story of their own.
629d182fab664b3e751b7010e76cdfc37d5ee219_660There are so many small details in O’Dell’s work that each time you look at them you will notice something you missed before, making them beautifully decorated and mysterious pieces of art.
Via Juxtapoz
See more Images via Hauntingly ethereal portraits of girls evoke loneliness and mystery | Creative Boom.

Loss and the Transient Beauty of Rone.

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The opening of Melbourne street artist Rone’s exhibition, Empty, in Fitzroy. (Supplied: Sophie Argiriou)
by Julia Baird
For the artistically stunted among us, the idea of labouring intensely on murals while perched on ladders, cranes and cherry pickers for days or weeks, only to have our beautiful images tagged with graffiti or smashed to rubble, is a profoundly depressing one.
But for street artists, it’s a singular thrill. Temporariness is part of the game.
When I stand in an empty old movie theatre, the Star Lyric in Melbourne’s Fitzroy, looking at an enormous, delicately drawn female face, two storeys high, the thought that it will amount to a painted pile of rocks in a few days is difficult to stomach.
But the artist, Rone, created it knowing that the building would be destroyed by developers shortly after his current exhibition, Empty, closes.

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A painting of a woman dominates a wall in an empty old movie theatre as light pours through round windows.
Portraits of beautiful women shine in Rone’s exhibition in Melbourne.
A finite lifespan, he says, is what makes street art singular: it blooms suddenly, then is exposed to the elements.
“The temporariness is what makes it contemporary, of the moment, and more important or special,” he says.“When someone paints something on the street it won’t be protected, anyone can come with spray paint and draw a dick on it, and destroy it — but you walk away, there’s not much you can do about it.”
Read on further It’s about loss’: The transient beauty of Rone – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Island in the Sky, British Columbia.

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Image Credit: Photograph by Shane Kalyn
“There is an ethereal, otherworldly feeling to this photograph, as this little island in the middle of Tumuch Lake in northern British Columbia appears as if it’s floating in the clouds,” says Shane Kalyn, who submitted this photo to the National Geographic Traveller Photo Contest.
The scene was amazing to witness, let alone be lucky enough to photograph—totally the right place at the right time.”
This photo and caption were submitted to the 2014 National Geographic Traveller Photo Contest.
via Tumuch Lake Picture — Canada Photo — National Geographic Photo of the Day.

Frost Flowers at Lake Akan, Japan.

frostflowers3When the weather dips below -15°C (5°F), a beautiful natural phenomenon can occur, producing a fractal flourish of ice known as “frost flowers.”
These delicate blooms are made entirely of ice crystals that grow in patches around three to four centimeters in diameter.
They are specific to thin lake ice in calm weather conditions, and they form in a branching, tree-like pattern that mimics a rose or petal.
When present, the frost flowers transform the landscape into an ethereal wonderland.

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The ice blooms seen here are located in Hokkaido, Japan on Lake Akan.
Its conditions are just right for these crystalline structures to exist—a mountain blocks the wind so the scenery is peaceful.
When looking at the meadow of frost flowers, you might feel the same tranquility needed for them to thrive.
See more Images via photo – My Modern Met

Mikko’s Night, Finland.

Mikko-Lagerstedt02A continuation of his Night series in which he transforms the landscape of Finland, by blending two different exposures, into something ethereal and dreamlike.
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via Night II: Photos by Mikko Lagerstedt – Faith is Torment.

The Darkness of Melania Brescia.

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By Sarah Ann Loreth
Melania Brescia is an introvert, but that hasn’t stopped her from creating a bold and dark body of work that places herself both behind and in front of the camera.
Inspired by bouts of sadness and depression, her self-portraiture started as a constructive way to deal with emotions she couldn’t convey in any other way.
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Her images served as a photographic journal of her experiences.
Learning to deal with her extreme introversion, Melania feels most comfortable creating entirely alone, preferring to manage each part of the process from modeling, to shooting, to editing.
Her work touches on a side of life most of us can relate to and there is a bravery in being able to turn those dark periods into beautiful pieces of art.
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Read on further for the Interview with Melania Brescia
http://goo.gl/etVB0g

The Art of Khoa Lee.

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I absolutely find Khoa Lee’s work enthralling, insanely delightful and full of colour. Not to be missed.
See more Wonderful Images at Khoa Lee’s Website
http://bit.ly/1lKBnTq

Russian Fairytales, trans. Robert Bain (1915).

Russian fairy tales from the Russian of Polevoi, by R. Nisbet Bain, illustrated by Noel L. Nisbet; 1915; Frederick A. Stokes Co., New York.
A collection of Russian fairytales translated from the Russian of Nikolai Polevoy, a notable editor, writer, translator in the early 19th century.
The translations were made by Robert Nisbet Bain, a British historian who worked for the British Museum, and a polyglot who could reportedly speak over twenty languages fluently.
He famously taught himself Hungarian in order that he could read the works of Mór Jókai in the original after first reading him in German, going on to become the most prolific translator into English from Hungarian in the nineteenth century.
Source: Russian Fairytales (1915) | The Public Domain Review