A White Migaloo snapped off Australian coast.

A Migaloo swims by Byron Bay with another whale. Image Credit: Photograph by Craig Parry.
by Patrick Williams,
A stunning photograph of a Migaloo making his way up the eastern Australian coast has snagged Craig Parry, a Byron Bay photographer a prestigious international award.
Titled The Ghost, Craig Parry’s photo of the famed white whale won first place in the underwater world category at the 2017 Golden Turtle International Photography Competition in Moscow this week.
The 38-year-old was the only Australian to win a photography category at the awards, which attracted more than 10,000 entries across all categories.
The Sony-sponsored photographer’s winning shot was snapped off Byron Bay in July last year. “It was by far the pinnacle of my career,” he said.”It was kind of random. We heard he went past Yamba the day before in the late afternoon so we worked out he should be hitting Byron Bay just on sunrise”.
Source: Photographer wins international recognition for amazing Migaloo shot off Australian coast – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

The Vanishing Northern White Rhino.

6896The last known male northern white rhinoceros at the Ol Pejeta conservancy in Laikipia County, Kenya.
The conservancy is home to the planet’s last-three northern white rhinoceros.
As 2016 draws to an end, awareness of the devastation of poaching is greater than ever and countries have turned to high-tech warfare — drones, night-goggles and automatic weapons — to stop increasingly armed poachers.
Photograph: Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images
See more images via The week in wildlife – in pictures | Environment | The Guardian

A Leopard in Sihouette.

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Leopards are graceful and powerful big cats closely related to lions, tigers, and jaguars.
They live in sub-Saharan Africa, northeast Africa, Central Asia, India, and China. However, many of their populations are endangered, especially outside of Africa.
The leopard is so strong and comfortable in trees that it often hauls its kills into the branches. By dragging the bodies of large animals aloft it hopes to keep them safe from scavengers such as hyenas.
Leopards can also hunt from trees, where their spotted coats allow them to blend with the leaves until they spring with a deadly pounce.
These nocturnal predators also stalk antelope, deer, and pigs by stealthy movements in the tall grass.
When human settlements are present, leopards often attack dogs and, occasionally, people.
Leopards are strong swimmers and very much at home in the water, where they sometimes eat fish or crabs
via Leopards, Leopard Pictures, Leopard Facts – National Geographic.

Snow Leopards, central Asia.

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Native to the Central Asian mountains, the snow leopard is a rare sight, with only about 6,000 left in the wild. They are hunted for their beautiful, warm fur and for their organs, which are used in traditional Chinese medicine.
Photograph by Michael Nichols.
These rare, beautiful gray leopards live in the mountains of Central Asia. They are insulated by thick hair, and their wide, fur-covered feet act as natural snowshoes.
Snow leopards have powerful legs and are tremendous leapers, able to jump as far as 50 feet (15 meters). They use their long tails for balance and as blankets to cover sensitive body parts against the severe mountain chill.
Snow leopards prey upon the blue sheep (bharal) of Tibet and the Himalaya, as well as the mountain ibex found over most of the rest of their range.
Though these powerful predators can kill animals three times their weight, they also eat smaller fare, such as marmots, hares, and game birds.
One Indian snow leopard, protected and observed in a national park, is reported to have consumed five blue sheep, nine Tibetan woolly hares, twenty-five marmots, five domestic goats, one domestic sheep, and fifteen birds in a single year.
As these numbers indicate, snow leopards sometimes have a taste for domestic animals, which has led to killings of the big cats by herders.
These endangered cats appear to be in dramatic decline because of such killings, and due to poaching driven by illegal trades in pelts and in body parts used for traditional Chinese medicine.
Vanishing habitat and the decline of the cats’ large mammal prey are also contributing factors.
Read on via Snow Leopards, Snow Leopard Pictures, Snow Leopard Facts – National Geographic.

The Last Tribe of the Caribbean.

51e29044-e63a-49f9-9b86-c33a0ce1d03b-2060x1457There are roughly 50,000 Kuna, who are one of the largest remaining indigenous South American tribes
Photographer Eric Lafforgue documents the island tribe, whose existence is threatened by rising sea levels. 18f5f438-72ec-4bfd-b549-164a3ec307d5-2060x2060
The Kuna live on the San Blas islands off the coast of Panama – which have one of the world’s highest populations of albinos
fbea5cff-7551-410f-8821-0aec3c38d228-2060x1457The islands have one of the highest populations of albinos in the world.
via The Kuna: the endangered last tribe of the Caribbean – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian.

The Phillippine Eagle is Disappearing.

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Photography by Joel Forte, Antipolo City, Philippines – Photographed at Davao City, Philippines
If the irrevocable transition of one species from rarity to extinction causes a rent in the fabric of our planet, exactly how big a hole would be left by the loss of the Philippine eagle?
No disrespect is meant to the basking malachite damselfly or the fine-lined pocketbook mussel, because all creatures—and plants too—help turn the infinitely complex cogs of the biosphere.
But the loss of this glorious bird would steal some of the world’s wonder. It glides through its sole habitat, the rain forests of the Philippines, powerful wings spread to seven feet, navigating the tangled canopy with unexpected precision.
It is possible that no one has ever described this rare raptor, one of the world’s largest, without using the word “magnificent.” If there are those who did, then heaven heal their souls.
In the kind of irony all too familiar to conservationists, however, the very evolutionary adaptations that made it magnificent have also made it one of the planet’s most endangered birds of prey.
There is no competition for prey from tigers, leopards, bears, or wolves in the Philippine archipelago, the eagle’s only home, so it became, by default, the king of the rain forest.
Expanding into an empty ecological niche, it grew to a length of three feet and a weight of up to 14 pounds.
A nesting pair requires 25 to 50 square miles of forest to find enough prey—mammals such as flying lemurs and monkeys; snakes; and other birds—to feed themselves and the single young they produce every other year.
“The birds had the islands all to themselves, and they grew big,” says Filipino biologist Hector Miranda, who has studied the eagles extensively.
“But it was a trade-off, because the forest that created them is almost gone. And when the forest disappears—well, they’re at an evolutionary dead end.”
Read more at National Geographic.