Spectacular Crash at Belgian F1 Grand Prix.

McLaren’s Spanish driver Fernando Alonso (in air) crashes over Sauber F1’s Monegasque driver Charles Leclerc during the first lap of the Belgian Formula One Grand Prix at the Spa-Francorchamps circuit in Spa on August 26, 2018.
Image Credit: Photograph by John Thys / AFP / Getty.
Source: Photos of the Week: Bog Snorkeling, Air Guitar, Canadian Calf – The Atlantic

‘Firestorm’, 2008 by Fabian & Walter

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Firestorm, from the series The Quiet of Dissolution, 2008.
For its exhibition, the Parasol unit gallery has collected together artists who uncover the weirdness beating at the heart of placid landscapes.
Image Credit: Photograph by Sonja Brass, Fabian & Claude Walter Gallery
See more unusual images via Uncanny valleys: sinister landscapes from around the world – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian

The Cootamundra Rail Disaster.

w640by Paula Bray
This photograph from the Museum’s Tyrrell collection shows the aftermath of one of Australia’s worst rail disasters of the 19th century.
The accident occurred in the early hours of the morning of 25 January 1885 about five kms south of Cootamundra. The train had left from Albury and was fully laden with mail and passengers, many of them travelling to Sydney to attend the Randwick races the following day.
It had been raining heavily for several days throughout southern NSW and the embankment supporting the rail line over Salt Clay Creek had collapsed and washed away, leaving only the unsupported tracks. As the Australian Town and Country Journal reported,
This left a very large gap, about 50yd wide and about 9ft deep, and into it the mail train dashed.
Attempts to warn the driver had proved futile. Eight people died and 20 were seriously injured. The Kerang Times and Swan Hill Gazette reported the gruesome discovery of a head “stuffed under the cushions”.
The North Eastern Ensign described the aftermath:
The spot at which the accident occurred is situated so far in the bush from any road that it was found to be a very arduous task to bring proper aid to the sufferers, or to remove them to Cootamundra and other places, where preparations could be made to receive them. These circumstances rendered an otherwise terrible catastrophe still more heart rending, as the poor victims of the smash were obliged to lie for hours under the pitiless rain which seems to have fallen in abnormal volume.
It is intriguing how a photographer from the Henry King studio in Sydney came to be on the scene at what appears to be a very early stage of the salvage operation. Perhaps he was on the train.
The fate of the locomotive is unknown but was said to have fractured its boiler in the accident. It appears to be No 31 and is one of the G23 Class, a 2-4-0 passenger type engine used by the NSW Government Railways.
Appropriately this photo features on the cover of a new publication from the Powerhouse Museum, All is Not Lost: the Collection Recovery Book, which gives advice on how to salvage treasured items affected by disaster.
Photography by Henry King
Read on via Cootamundra railway disaster | Photo of the Day – Powerhouse Museum.

The 1863 New York Draft Riots.

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Only 10 days after the Union victory at the Battle of Gettysburg, New York City became embroiled in the largest popular insurrections in American history.
The incident began on the morning of July 13, 1863, when hundreds of young men poured into the streets to protest the federal draft lottery.
New York was deeply divided over the Civil War, and many viewed the conscription law—which excluded blacks and allowed wealthy men to buy their way out of serving for $300—as a blatant civil rights violation.
The demonstration quickly turned violent when the mob stormed the draft office and beat the city’s police superintendent to a bloody pulp.
As the protestors’ ranks swelled with armed malcontents, the men marched through Manhattan and began ransacking and burning the homes and offices of prominent draft supporters and other wealthy elites.
The bedlam would continue for four days, as rioters looted businesses, torched buildings and brawled with police and National Guardsmen from behind makeshift barricades.
Convinced that freed blacks were a threat to their livelihood, rioters also beat and lynched several black men, demolished the homes of others and even set a black children’s orphanage ablaze.
Finally, on June 16, some 4,000 federal troops marched into the city and put the uprising down by force.
While the draft would resume only a month later, the riots still left a devastating mark on New York.
All told, the incident claimed the lives of more than 100 people and caused millions of dollars in property damage.
via  HISTORY Lists.