“The Building came Crashing down.”

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Just after five p.m. on Friday 9 August 9, 1973, there was an ominous rumbling sound at the University Hotel in Greenwich Village.
Then, as The Village Voice reported: “The plaster ceilings started falling. Four minutes later the wooden beams gave in.
Floors began crumbling and caving.
There were screams, people rushing into the street. Joseph Cooper, hotel manager, dialed 911 and then ran outside.
He was in the street when he heard a large, awful crack, he remembers, and then the eight-floor building fell to the ground.”
READ ON via The Theater Came Crashing Down | Narratively | Human stories, boldly told..

“The Krakatoa Sunsets”.

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Lithograph from 1888 showing the Krakatoa eruption, author unknown.
During the winter of 1883 the poet Gerard Manley Hopkins descended into one of his periodic depressions, “a wretched state of weakness and weariness, I can’t tell why,” he wrote, “always drowsy and incapable of reading or thinking to any effect.” It was partly boredom:
Hopkins was ungainfully employed at a Catholic boarding school in Lancashire, where much of his time was spent steering his pupils through their university entrance exams.
The thought that he was wasting his time and talents weighed heavily upon him during the long, brooding walks he took through the “sweet landscape” of Ribblesdale, “thy lovely dale”, as he described it in one of the handful of poems he managed to compose that winter.
He was about to turn forty and felt trapped.
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Gerard Manley Hopkins in 1866, detail from a photo by Thomas C. Bayfield. National Portrait Gallery.
Gerard Manley Hopkins in 1866, detail from a photo by Thomas C. Bayfield. National Portrait Gallery – See more at: http://publicdomainreview.org/2012/05/28/the-krakatoa-sunsets/#sthash.6PTNTSK9.dpuf
Such was his state of mind when the Krakatoa sunsets began.
The tiny volcanic island of Krakatoa (located halfway between Java and Sumatra) had staged a spectacular eruption at the end of August 1883, jettisoning billions of tonnes of ash and debris deep into the earth’’s upper atmosphere.
Nearly 40,000 people had been killed by a series of mountainous waves thrown out by the force of the explosion: the Javan port of Anjer had been almost completely destroyed, along with more than a hundred coastal towns and villages. ““All gone. Plenty lives lost”, as a telegram sent from Serang reported, and for weeks afterwards the bodies of the drowned continued to wash up along the shoreline.
Meanwhile, the vast volcanic ash-cloud had spread into a semi-opaque band that threaded slowly westward around the equator, forming memorable sunsets and afterglows across the earth’’s lower latitudes.
A few weeks later, the stratospheric veil moved outwards from the tropics to the poles, and by late October 1883 most of the world, including Britain, was being subjected to lurid evening displays, caused by the scattering of incoming light by the meandering volcanic haze.
Throughout November and December, the skies flared through virulent shades of green, blue, copper and magenta, “more like inflamed flesh than the lucid reds of ordinary sunsets,” wrote Hopkins; “the glow is intense; that is what strikes everyone; it has prolonged the daylight, and optically changed the season; it bathes the whole sky, it is mistaken for the reflection of a great fire.”
Read on via The Krakatoa Sunsets | The Public Domain Review.

“The Tragic Tale of Atomic Man”.

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For the first time since the accident in 1976, workers at Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Washington are planning to clean out the room where chemicals exploded in Harold McCluskey’s face, showering him with radiation 500 times the occupational limit and embedding radioactive americium in his skull, turning him into the Atomic Man.
McCluskey, improbably, survived the incident. (He later said, “Of nine doctors, four thought I had a 50-50 chance and the rest just shook their heads.”) The massive dose of radiation left him with health problems, and decades later, his body still set off Geiger counters.
But the most painful legacy of the explosion was probably the isolation, both physical and social, as other humans shied away from his radioactive body.
When the accident happened on August 30, 1976, McCluskey had just returned to his job as a technician after a five-month strike had shut down the Plutonium Finishing Plant at Hanford.
The material he was working with had become unstable after the long hiatus and so right after he added nitric acid as instructed, it exploded, blowing out the glove box that was supposed to contain it.

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Harold McCluskey.
His body—now covered in blood and shards of metal and glass—was taken to the decontamination center where he stayed in an isolation of concrete and steel.
Nobody was allowed near him out of fear for the radiation he still emitted.
“Blinded, his hearing damaged by the explosion, McCluskey spent the next three weeks at the unit cut off from personal contact,” described a later profile in People. “Monitored, like an alien, by nurses wearing respirators and protective clothing, he could neither see nor clearly understand the attendants who approached.”
The nurses scrubbed and shaved him every day—the bath towels and bathwater now part of Hanford’s radioactive waste.
He endured 600 shots of zinc DTPA, a drug that binds to radioactive metals.
Harold McCluskey died in 1987.
Read on via The Tragic Tale of Atomic Man: Life as a Radioactive Human.

“The Hindenburg Disaster.”

s_a22_05060113The Hindenburg  disaster took place on Thursday, 6 May, 1937, as the German passenger airship LZ 129 Hindenburg  caught fire and was destroyed during its attempt to dock with its mooring mast at the Lakehurst Naval Air Station, which is located adjacent to the borough of Lakehurst, New Jersey.
Of the 97 people on board (36 passengers and 61 crewmen), there were 35 fatalities. There was also one death of a ground crewman.
The disaster was the subject of spectacular newsreel coverage, photographs, and Herbert Morrison‘s recorded radio eyewitness reports from the landing field, which was broadcast the next day.
A variety of hypotheses have been put forward for both the cause of ignition and the initial fuel for the ensuing fire.
The incident shattered public confidence in the giant, passenger-carrying rigid airship and marked the end of the airship era.
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via Wikipedia.

“Protecting yourself from Lightning Strikes.”

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Photo: If you are stranded outside in an electrical storm do not shelter under tall objects such as trees or poles. (Rohan Coghlan: User submitted)
by Samantha Turnbull
It is storm season in Australia and, while being struck by lightning is considered a rare occurrence, there are several steps people can take to keep safe.
ABC science expert Dr Karl Kruszelnicki said there were roughly 100 lightning strikes every second around the world resulting in about 100 deaths per year.
He said the safest place to be during an electrical storm was indoors.
If you are indoors, the Bureau of Meteorology suggests unplugging appliances before the storm hits.
Dr Kruszelnicki said it was particularly important to stay away from telephones during a storm.
“If you have a landline phone connected by a wire to the exchange, lightning can hit anywhere along that line depending on how the wire travels (underground or overground),” Dr Kruszelnicki said.
“Telstra does warn there are cases where people have been harmed using a corded phone.
“You should switch off all your electrical appliances, even switch them off at the circuit board.
“The Bureau of Meterology also advises anyone indoors to close all of their windows and doors and to stay away from openings including fire places.
Dr Kruszelnicki said the safest place to be was in the middle of the building. “Sit or huddle in the middle of the room and enjoy the show,” he said.
The Bureau and Dr Kruszelnicki also advised people not to take a bath because water and metal are electrical conductors.
Please read the full article via How to protect yourself from lightning strikes – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

“The Gates of Hell”.

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There are places on Earth that are a little creepy, places that feel a little haunted and places that are downright hellish. The Darvaza gas crater, nicknamed by locals “The Door to Hell,” or “The Gates of Hell,” definitely falls into the latter category—and its sinister burning flames are just the half of it.
Located in the Karakum Desert of central Turkmenistan (a little over 150 miles from the country’s capital) the pit attracts hundreds of tourists each year. It also attracts nearby desert wildlife—reportedly, from time to time local spiders are seen plunging into the pit by the thousands, lured to their deaths by the glowing flames.
So how did this fiery inferno end up in the middle of a desert in Turkmenistan? In 1971, when the republic was still part of the Soviet Union, a group of Soviet geologists went to the Karakum in search of oil fields.
They found what they thought to be a substantial oil field and began drilling.
Unfortunately for the scientists, they were drilling on top of a cavernous pocket of natural gas which couldn’t support the weight of their equipment. The site collapsed, taking their equipment along with it—and the event triggered the crumbly sedimentary rock of the desert to collapse in other places too, creating a domino-effect that resulted in several open craters by the time all was said and done.
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The largest of these craters measures about 230-feet across and 65-feet deep. Reportedly, no one was injured in the collapse, but the scientists soon had another problem on their hands: the natural gas escaping from the crater.
Natural gas is composed mostly of methane, which, though not toxic, does displace oxygen, making it difficult to breathe. This wasn’t so much an issue for the scientists, but for the animals that call the Karakum Desert home—shortly after the collapse, animals roaming the area began to die.
The escaping methane also posed dangers due to its flammability—there needs to be just five percent methane in the air for an explosion to potentially take place. So the scientists decided to light the crater on fire, hoping that all the dangerous natural gas would burn away in a few weeks’ time.
Read More via This Hellish Desert Pit Has Been On Fire for More Than 40 Years | Travel | Smithsonian.