Wendiceratops, Horned Dinosaur.

1333423745358311338Wendiceratops roamed southern Alberta around 79 million years ago, when the area was a lush lowland on the western edge of a seaway covering the middle of North America.
Parts of at least four Wendiceratops were found together, including a mix of younger and older animals. None are complete, but enough is preserved to allow a fairly detailed reconstruction of the overall anatomy.
Wendiceratops is unique among horned dinosaurs in the configuration of the forward-hooked bones studding the back of the frill. Each species has its own “fingerprint” of frill bones, so it’s pretty easy to pick out Wendiceratops from the crowd of its close relatives.
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To me, it’s quite interesting that the frill of Wendiceratops is similar (but not identical) to an animal called Sinoceratops, which lived a few million years later in China. This suggests a close evolutionary relationship between the two animals. Does it mean that Wendiceratops or one of its descendents wandered over to China from North America?
That’s certainly possible, and warrants additional study. Horned dinosaur skulls are developmentally plastic, so it’s also possible that the anatomy in Sinoceratops was independently evolved. We’ll need more fossils to figure this out!
Introducing Wendiceratops, a Spectacular New Horned Dinosaur
Skeletal reconstruction of Wendiceratops, with known bones shown in blue.
Like many of its close relatives, Wendiceratops had a big nose horn.
This in itself is not unusual, but within geological time Wendiceratops is the oldest horned dinosaur to have the feature. Paleontologists have suspected for awhile that enlarged nose horns evolved at least twice in horned dinosaurs (once in the line leading to Triceratops and once in the line leading to Wendiceratops and its relatives…and maybe a third time in the “primitive” Protoceratops).
Now we know a little more about the timing! Fossils like Wendiceratops add critical details to the broad-brush evolutionary picture.
Wendiceratops (named in honor of its discoverer, Wendy Sloboda.
This article originally appeared at PLOS Blogs and is republished here under a creative commons license. Image credits: Danielle Dufault via Evans and Ryan, 2015.
via Introducing Wendiceratops, a Spectacular New Horned Dinosaur.

“Nose King Dinosaur found”.

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Utah scientists believe they have discovered a new dinosaur species they named Rhinorex condrupus.
Rhinorex literally means ‘nose king’.
Yes, you got it right, this dinosaurs had one impressive nose.
North Carolina State University’s Terry Gates and Brigham Young University’s Rodney Scheetz analyzed the fossils found in 1992 in Utah’s Book Cliffs.
The herbivore Rhinorex lived around 75 million years ago in what were then Utah swamps. Rhinorex is a hadrosaur similar to Gryposaurus, but its flamboyant nose makes the 30 feet and 4 tones Rhinorex stand out.
The two scientists had a couple of materials available for analysis: the dinosaur’s skull, a partial sandstone encased skeleton, and skin impressions.
“If this dinosaur is anything like its relatives then it likely did not have a super sense of smell,” NC State postdoctoral researcher Terry Gates said in a statement, “but maybe the nose was used as a means of attracting mates, recognizing members of its species, or even as a large attachment for a plant-smashing beak.
We are already sniffing out answers to these questions.”
via Nose King Dinosaur Discovered in Utah.

“Bigger than T.Rex”.

spinosaurus_swimming_1170-770x460by Steve Koppe
The largest known predatory dinosaur to roam the Earth was nine feet longer than the world’s biggest T. Rex specimen.
Scientists report that Spinosaurus aegyptiacus also appears to have been the first truly semiaquatic dinosaur.
New fossils of the massive Cretaceous-era predator reveal it adapted to life in the water some 95 million years ago, providing the most compelling evidence to date of a dinosaur able to live and hunt in an aquatic environment.
via Bigger than T. rex, this dinosaur hunted in water – Futurity.

“The Curious Case of The T-Rex Footprint”.

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It was Professor Phil Manning who discovered the first known Tyrannosaur footprint in the Hell Creek formation in Montana.
He’d seen it on the last day of an expedition in 2006 but did not have the time to investigate further, so he returned the following year and began to search for it all over again.
It is rather unremarkable to look at and unless you knew what you were looking at you wouldn’t notice it.
Rather thinner than one would expect a foot to be, the toes only just joined to the main foot and it is raised in profile rather than indented.
And it is much darker than the rock around it.
It measures around 29 inches long and similarly wide and was formed when a T-Rex walked in the clay of a flood plain, compressing it enough that it became tougher than the rock surrounding it and so it survived, just, when the rock around it eroded.
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As well as the footprint itself being the right size and shape for a T-Rex, the other compelling evidence that this is genuinely from a T-Rex is that it was discovered right where it is known T-Rex died, and therefore lived.
One that was claimed to have been found in Mexico was disputed and dismissed as there was no sign anywhere near it that T-Rex was ever there.
Now one has been found, others will come to light but considering the timescale it is astounding that even one survives.
via Historical Honey The Curious Case of The T-Rex Footprint » Historical Honey.

“Bad Luck for the Dinosaurs”.

1345351768_1e730a4876_b1A hadrosaur Skeleton, Field Museum (Credit: Lisa Andres)
by Paul Rodgers.
Dinosaurs would be walking the Earth today if it weren’t for a “colossal” piece of bad luck.
Had the asteroid that brought their reign to an end struck at “a more convenient time” they could well have survived the cataclysm, according to new research.
And that in turn would mean no humans.
“If dinosaurs didn’t go extinct, then mammals would have never had their opportunity to blossom.
So if it wasn’t for that asteroid, then humans probably wouldn’t be here. It’s as simple as that,” said Dr Stephen Brusatte, a palaeontologist at Edinburgh University’s school of geosciences.
“Not only did a giant asteroid strike, but it happened at the worst possible time, when their ecosystems were vulnerable,” said Dr Brusatte, a co-discoverer of the Pinnochio rex tyrannosaur (Qianzhousaurus sinensis) announced in May.
“It was a perfect storm of events, when dinosaurs were at their most vulnerable.”
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A triceratops at the American Museum of Natural History (Credit: Wikipedia)
The arrival of the Chicxulub bolide (comet or giant meteorite) 66 million years ago, in what is now Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula, left a crater 20km deep and 180km in diameter and caused a global catastrophe including firestorms, tsunamis, and earthquakes.
The 10km wide rock released enough dust, ash, and aerosols into the air to create a global “impact winter” that lasted for a decade.
The Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event (formerly known as the Cretaceous-Tertiary) is thought to have killed three quarters of the earth’s species.
At particular risk were large creatures – the dinosaurs – that depended on equally large food intake.
Only those dinosaurs that could fly survived, eventually evolving into today’s birds.
Read on via The (Atrocious) Luck Of The Dinosaurs.

“Paleoart”.

hero_shotThe works of Julius Csotonyi and Robert Nicholls feature in the book Dinosaur Art: The World’s Greatest Paleoart, images from which are found in the attached gallery.
Julius T. Csotonyi is a freelance natural history illustrator and palaeoartist based in Canada.
He has worked with many major museums and book publishers, including the National Geographic Society and the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology.
His work encompasses dinosaurs and other prehistoric life, as well as living animals,

Capture

Robert Nicholls is a UK-based artist who produces unique and exciting palaeontological and archaeological artworks.
His illustrations, murals and 3D models are exhibited in many universities, museums, theme parks and attractions worldwide and appear in numerous books and journals.
Read on via Q&A: The world’s greatest palaeoart – Australian Geographic.