Did Man Evolve because that Asteroid wiped out the Dinosaurs?

1345351768_1e730a4876_b1A hadrosaur Skeleton, Field Museum (Credit: Lisa Andres)
by Paul Rodgers.
Dinosaurs would be walking the Earth today if it weren’t for a “colossal” piece of bad luck.
Had the asteroid that brought their reign to an end struck at “a more convenient time” they could well have survived the cataclysm, according to new research.
And that in turn would mean no humans.
“If dinosaurs didn’t go extinct, then mammals would have never had their opportunity to blossom.
So if it wasn’t for that asteroid, then humans probably wouldn’t be here. It’s as simple as that,” said Dr Stephen Brusatte, a palaeontologist at Edinburgh University’s school of geosciences.
“Not only did a giant asteroid strike, but it happened at the worst possible time, when their ecosystems were vulnerable,” said Dr Brusatte, a co-discoverer of the Pinnochio rex tyrannosaur (Qianzhousaurus sinensis) announced in May.
“It was a perfect storm of events, when dinosaurs were at their most vulnerable.”
670px-triceratops_dino1
A triceratops at the American Museum of Natural History (Credit: Wikipedia)
The arrival of the Chicxulub bolide (comet or giant meteorite) 66 million years ago, in what is now Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula, left a crater 20km deep and 180km in diameter and caused a global catastrophe including firestorms, tsunamis, and earthquakes.
The 10km wide rock released enough dust, ash, and aerosols into the air to create a global “impact winter” that lasted for a decade.
The Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event (formerly known as the Cretaceous-Tertiary) is thought to have killed three quarters of the earth’s species.
At particular risk were large creatures – the dinosaurs – that depended on equally large food intake.
Only those dinosaurs that could fly survived, eventually evolving into today’s birds.
Read on via The (Atrocious) Luck Of The Dinosaurs.

Lovable Stegosaurus had a Brain as big as a Lime.

The stegosaurus is one of the more well-known dinosaurs out there, appearing in more forms of media than almost any of its lizardy brethren with the exception of the T-Rex and possible that dinosaur with wings on its legs.
Interestingly, it’s also one of the dumbest.
We say this not because we have anything against the stegosaurus, because that couldn’t be further from the truth, we love the stegosaurus because how could we not love a dinosaur with an in-built Mohawk?
No, the reason we’re saying that the stegosaurus is probably one of the dumbest dinosaurs to have existed is because it literally had one of the smallest brains we’re aware of.
As noted here, the stegosaurus had a brain no bigger than a lime, although this is bigger than people initially thought, since it used to be believed that the stegosaurus’ brain was no bigger than a walnut, it still means that the dinosaur had statistically, the smallest brain of any dinosaur we’re currently aware of.
We should make it clear that this isn’t necessarily a bad thing, a stegosaurus didn’t need to contemplate philosophy or do long division in its head because it’s life was, overall, pretty good.
However, in the early days of palaeontology, people examining the skulls of stegosaurus remains couldn’t accept that a creature of such immense size and girth could survive with such a tiny brain, so it was theorised that the creature must have had a second brain, in its arse.
The actual reasoning behind the theory isn’t as stupid as that, but it is is painfully close.
To explain, palaeontologists back in the day noticed that the stegosaurus had a weird cavity in the booty area of its spine.
This cavity was larger than the cranial cavity that housed the dinosaur’s brain so it was simply assumed that it must have contained a second brain of some sort.
That was literally it.
This theory  persisted for decades because what else could that cavity be for? As it so happens, no one really knows what the cavity is for.
But we’re getting ahead of ourselves, the important thing to remember here is that at one point in time, it was literally believed that stegosaurus’ had a second brain in it’s arse.
via People Used to Think The Stegosaurus Had Two Brains | Fact Fiend.

Changyuraptor, four-winged Dinosaur had huge tail feathers, China.

Changyuraptor
Changyuraptor, a 125 million year old  four winged dinosaur with record breaking tail feathers from China.  Image Credit: Stephanie Abramowicz
Contributor: John Pickrell is the editor of Australian Geographic.
IN THE EARLY stages of evolving flight, feathered dinosaurs tried an interesting experiment: they developed four wings.
These small dinosaurs – such as Microraptor, Anchiornis and Xiaotingia – had large flight feathers on their hind limbs as well as their fore limbs, and they had long bony tails, similarly replete with large feathers.
It appears that many early birds, such as Archaeopteryx, may also have had long feathers on their hind limbs.
It was only later that birds developed the characteristically bald legs that (most) birds have today, and became aerodynamically stable on two wings and a much-reduced tail.
Microraptor was the first of the four-winged dinosaurs to be discovered, in 2003, and it was tiny for a dinosaur: approximately 1kg in weight and similar to a crow or a raven in size.
Miniaturisation, experts thought, was an essential step in developing flight.
But now a totally new four-winged dinosaur has been discovered, and it was much larger.
Changyuraptor yangi – described in the journal Nature Communications – would have been around 4kg in weight and about the size of a turkey.
It also has a really unusual feature: an incredibly long tail with 30cm feathers that trailed out behind the body.
These tail feathers were around 30 per cent of the length of the skeleton, making them the longest known feathers of any (non-bird) dinosaur.
Read further via New four-winged dinosaur has record-breaking tail feathers – Australian Geographic.

Great Paleoart by Julius Csotonyi and Robert Nicholls.

hero_shotThe works of Julius Csotonyi and Robert Nicholls feature in the book Dinosaur Art: The World’s Greatest Paleoart, images from which are found in the attached gallery.
Julius T. Csotonyi is a freelance natural history illustrator and palaeoartist based in Canada.
He has worked with many major museums and book publishers, including the National Geographic Society and the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology.
His work encompasses dinosaurs and other prehistoric life, as well as living animals,

Capture

Robert Nicholls is a UK-based artist who produces unique and exciting palaeontological and archaeological artworks.
His illustrations, murals and 3D models are exhibited in many universities, museums, theme parks and attractions worldwide and appear in numerous books and journals.
Read on via Q&A: The world’s greatest palaeoart – Australian Geographic.

Heavily Armoured Dinosaur had Ginger camouflage to deter predators.

An illustration of Borealopelta markmitchelli.
The study suggests that it displayed a camouflage effect known as counter-shading. Illustration: Julius Csotonyi/Courtesy of the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology.
It was built like a tank, covered in armour, and weighed about the same as a caravan – but this beefy dinosaur was still at risk of being gobbled up by predators, scientists have discovered.
Thought to have lived about 110m years ago, the giant herbivore is believed to be a type of heavily armoured dinosaur known as a nodosaur and would have reached up to 5.5 metres in length.
On show at the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology in Alberta, Canada, its fossilised remains have stunned researchers, who have hailed it as the best-preserved armoured dinosaur in the world.
Not only are its bones preserved, but the fossil also boasts the creature’s armour, stomach contents and even a thin film of organic material, thought to be remains of pigments from the skin and horns.
Source: Heavily armoured dinosaur had ginger camouflage to deter predators – study | Science | The Guardian

Laelaps by Paleoartist Charles R. Knight, 1897.

Laelaps by Charles R Knight, 1897
Knight was one of the foremost American paleoartists, and Laelaps was profoundly influential for its remarkably credible depiction of anatomy and movement.
Note: Some believe that these predators represent the savagely competitive palaeontologists Othniel C Marsh and Edward Drinker Cope, both of whom would blow up dig sites with dynamite to obstruct the other’s discoveries.
Source: Paleoart: the strange history of dinosaurs in art – in pictures | Books | The Guardian