Predators in 3D.

geometric-predators-by-maxim-shkret-1Maxim Shkret is an artist and designer from Krasnodar, Russia.
In a series entitled Predators on Behance, Shkret created an awesome series of animal portraits using 3DS Max, V-Ray, ZBrush and Adobe CS5.
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In the project description he describes his style as a, “3D interpretation of vector graphics”.
For those interested in prints, Maxim has some available through Society6.
via Geometric Predators by Maxim Shkret «TwistedSifter.

The Jaws Baby Crib.

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In a darkly humorous homage to classic cinema, Joseph Reginella, a toy and set-prop sculptor based in New York, has created an awesome crib that makes it look like the baby sleeping in it is about to be devoured by the monstrous shark from Jaws.
The sculpture is a reenactment of the scene where the grizzled seaman Quint is devoured by the movie’s eponymous terror.
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Reginella made the bed for his nephew, Mikey Melaccio.
Looks like the kid might develop either an extreme fear of sharks or an affinity for them!
See more Images via Uncle Makes Jaws-Inspired Crib For His 2-Month-Old Nephew | Bored Panda.

Papercraft Animals.

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Papercraft animals resembling low polygon vector illustrations.
Estudio Guardabosques are Carolina Silvero and Juan Elizalde, a couple from Buenos Aires, Argentina who likes to draw and make things with paper, specially if it involves nature.
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See more Images via Faith is Torment | Art and Design Blog: Paper Mammals by Estudio Guardabosques.

The Pathe Foundation, Paris.

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For the last 8 years the Pathe Foundation in Paris has worked with Pritzker-winning architect Renzo Piano to design and construct their new headquarters.
Slated for a grand opening, photos have emerged that reveal, in the architect’s own words, “an unexpected presence”: a curved bulbous structure that looks like it’s been squeezed into an opening within a historic Parisian city block. “
The art of inserting a new building into an historic city block,” says Piano, “means engaging in an open, physical dialogue with the existing city buildings.” In other words, it’s an exercise in reclaiming space.

Hidden mostly behind buildings, the new headquarters, which will promote the Pathe’s heritage in cinematography with office spaces, film archives and a screening room, pokes its head out above the neighbors, looking like a giant armadillo.
Walking by, an unsuspecting visitor would have no idea was behind that street-side facade.
(via Designboom)
See more via The New Pathe Foundation Headquarters by Renzo Piano Squeezed Into a City Block in Paris | Colossal.

‘The Showstopper’ by Linda van Slobbe.

The Showstopper by Linda van Slobbe – Bar-du-Lac, France
‘This historic theatre is built in a typical oval shape which has the stage at one end and multiple floors and balconies all around.
This one has beautiful decorations’
Image Credit: Photograph by Linda van Slobbe.
via The walls have eyes: the best urban photography | Cities | The Guardian

Havana’s Oldest Printmaking Studio.

Ian Marcos Gutiérrez, a 23-year-old printer at the Taller Experimental de Gráfica, in Havana, helps the author prepare a block of lithographic limestone for printing. (Arien Chang Castán)
by Mimi Dwyer;
Photographs by Arien Chang Castán
Lithography arrived in Cuba before anywhere else in the Americas, as a way to protect the sanctity and integrity of the country’s industry.
By the early 19th century, Cuban exports, especially tobacco, had a prestige that made them valuable throughout the world.
Exporters wanted a way to protect Cuban industry from counterfeiters.
Using lithography, they could make seals and rings that both decorated their products and distinguished them from those of competitors.
The process depends more than anything on the repellent properties of oil and water, and their interaction with limestone. By using acids, powders, solvents, oils, and gum in specific combinations, lithographers manipulate the places a stone receives ink.
In this way, they can use a stone to print precise and intricate images onto paper.
Cuba imported thousands of lithographic limestones from Germany in the 1800s, when the technology was first emerging.
Cuban businessmen brought machines from France and Germany and lured experts to Havana who knew how to use them. Many of the original machines still work.
The Taller’s oldest is an intricate, red woodcutting machine from 1829, still used by artists every day.
In the 1950s, shortly before the revolution, aluminum replaced lithography as the best way to protect product identity, and the stones fell into disuse.
Campesinos started to use them to make walking paths through muddy fields. Habaneros, during the Cuban Missile Crisis, laid them around the city along with whatever other stones they could find to serve as barricades.
Cuban lithography would have died then but for a few artists who recognized the value of the craft.
They lobbied the government to protect the stones, and in 1962, as minister of industry, Che Guevara signed a mandate to provide materials, space, and machines to Cuban lithographers in the name of art.
The Taller was born from that directive, and it remains the oldest and best known print studio in Cuba.
It’s been producing work consistently since then.
Read the full article via Step Inside Cuba’s Oldest Printmaking Studio | Travel | Smithsonian