The Real “Peaky Blinders” Birmingham.

800px-Day_17_-_Peaky_BlindersRecords of the gang members and their crimes are preserved in Sparkhill’s West Midlands Police Museum.
The dank, slum streets of Birmingham are ruled by gangs made up of hundreds of youths armed with knives, razor blades and hammers.
Murders are rife. Robberies, thefts and riots are a daily occurrence at the hands of young gang members who hold the entire city in a fearful, bloody grip.
Police do their best to control the daily nightmare but are vastly outnumbered.
Their chilling nickname was derived from the razor blades carefully stitched into the front of their caps which could be used to blind their victims.
From as early as the 1870s, inner-city Birmingham streets were filled with overcrowded slums and extreme poverty – and the lure of crime was a pull for some.
It soon led to an eruption of gangs and violence across the city.
Battles to “own” areas such as Small Heath and Cheapside broke out. These saw hundreds of youths fighting – sometimes to the death – in mass brawls that lasted for hours.
The most prominent – and ruthless – of these early gangs were known as the Sloggers, or the Cheapside Slogging Gang.
For 30 years they ruled the city’s streets with protection rackets and violence.
Led by John Adrian, and his trusted lieutenant James Grinrod, they began their reign of terror in about 1870.
Their weapon of choice was a heavy-buckled belt used to pummel male and female victims of all ages into submission.
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Image caption: The Garrison Lane slums were home to Henry Lightfoot; one of the first to be referred to as a “Peaky Blinder”
An 1872 Birmingham Mail report records a typical example of the Sloggers’ antics.
It states how “400 roughs brought indiscriminate violence to the Cheapside area, attacking and stealing”.
Source: Birmingham’s real Peaky Blinders – BBC News

London Guide to Cheats and Swindlers.

londonguidestran00lond_0005A comprehensive guide to help the unwitting visitor avoid falling victim to the various and nefarious crimes abound in early 19th-century London.
Written by “a gentleman who has made the police of the metropolis an object of enquiry for twenty-two years”, the book is split into six main chapters: “Out Door Delinquencies”, “Inn Door Tricks”, “Miscellaneous Offences”, “House-Breakers”, “Minor Cheats”, and “Of Conspirators and Informers”, containing within them a multitude of sub-chapters including the rather wonderfully titled offences of “Smashing”, “Greeks and Legs”, “Private Stills”, “Bon Ton”, “Box Lobby”, and “Pretenders to Literature”.
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via The London Guide and Stranger’s Safeguard against the Cheats, Swindlers, and Pickpockets (1819) | The Public Domain Review.

Men who were the Inspiration for Sherlock Holmes.

tumblr_m6sdwxsAnb1qkgkowo1_500The inspiration for the character of Sherlock Holmes.
Doyle said that the character of Sherlock Holmes was inspired by Dr. Joseph Bell, a surgeon at the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh for whom Doyle had worked as a clerk.
Like Holmes, Bell was noted for drawing large conclusions from the smallest observations.
However, some years later Bell wrote in a letter to Conan Doyle: “You (meaning Conan Doyle) are yourself Sherlock Holmes and well you know it.”
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Sir Henry Littlejohn, Chair of Medical Jurisprudence at the University of Edinburgh Medical School, is also cited as an inspiration for Holmes. Littlejohn served as Police Surgeon and Medical Officer of Health of Edinburgh, providing for Doyle a link between medical investigation and the detection of crime.
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via Sherlock Holmes.

Bonnie Parker, Real & Imagined.

2-39Full-length portrait of American criminal Bonnie Parker (1910 – 1934) smoking a cigar while leaning on the front fender of a car and holding a pistol on 17 April, 1933.
Image Credit: Photograph by Hulton Archive/Getty Images

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Image: Actress Faye Dunaway portrayed Bonnie Parker in the 1967 movie “Bonnie and Clyde, opposite Warren Beatty who starred as Clyde Barrow.
(Warner Bros/ 7 Arts Production 1967).
Source: Striking Black And White Photos Show The Brutal Lives Of Gun-Toting Depression Era Mobs In America

“Bank Burglar’s Outfit,1887”.

6a00d83542d51e69e201a73dd5b424970d-500wiAs long as there is something worth stealing it is probably the case with the human race that what that something is won’t be, and will be stolen.
This has been the case forever, and as vigilant as an owner of property might be–whether that bit that stood for labor exchange units was a cow or land or gold or money itself–there will be someone else out there in the anti-vigilant world tempting fate and chance and skill at taking someone else’s belongings away.
We have a little window that has opened to reveal a piece of that world–an unusual one, for the 19th century, anyway.
That is what I saw when breezing through the memoirs of George Washington Wallace (1823-1891), Recollections of a Chief of Police, which was published in 1887.
Wallace was police chief of New York City, making him the police chief (sorry, Chicago), and he had some pretty good recollections to recollect.
(Which is a good thing he recorded this book when he did, because he would be dead four years later.
Read more via Ptak Science Books: The Correct Tools for the Job: Making Crime Pay But Not Really, 1893.

“The Smoothest Con Man Ever”.

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On a Sunday night in May 1935, Victor Lustig was strolling down Broadway on New York’s Upper West Side. At first, the Secret Service agents couldn’t be sure it was him. They’d been shadowing him for seven months, painstakingly trying to learn more about this mysterious and dapper man, but his newly grown mustache had thrown them off momentarily.
As he turned up the velvet collar on his Chesterfield coat and quickened his pace, the agents swooped in.
Surrounded, Lustig smiled and calmly handed over his suitcase. “Smooth,” was how one of the agents described him, noting a “livid scar” on his left cheekbone and “dark, burning eyes.” After chasing him for years, they’d gotten a close-up view of the man known as “the Count,” a nicknamed he’d earned for his suave and worldly demeanor.
He had long sideburns, agents observed, and “perfectly manicured nails.” Under questioning he was serene and poised. Agents expected the suitcase to contain freshly printed bank notes from various Federal Reserve series, or perhaps other tools of Lustig’s million-dollar counterfeiting trade. But all they found were expensive clothes.
At last, they pulled a wallet from his coat and found a key. They tried to get Lustig to say what it was for, but the Count shrugged and shook his head. The key led agents to the Times Square subway station, where it opened a dusty locker, and inside it agents found $51,000 in counterfeit bills and the plates from which they had been printed.
It was the beginning of the end for the man described by the New York Times as an “E. Phillips Oppenheim character in the flesh,” a nod to the popular English novelist best known for The Great Impersonation.
Secret Service agents finally had one of the world’s greatest imposters, wanted throughout Europe as well as in the United States. He’d amassed a fortune in schemes that were so grand and outlandish, few thought any of his victims could ever be so gullible.
He’d sold the Eiffel Tower to a French scrap-metal dealer. He’d sold a “money box” to countless greedy victims who believed that Lustig’s contraption was capable of printing perfectly replicated $100 bills. (Police noted that some “smart” New York gamblers had paid $46,000 for one.)
He had even duped some of the wealthiest and most dangerous mobsters—men like Al Capone, who never knew he’d been swindled.
Now the authorities were eager to question him about all of these activities, plus his possible role in several recent murders in New York and the shooting of Jack “Legs” Diamond, who was staying in a hotel room down the hall from Lustig’s on the night he was attacked.
“Count,” one of the Secret Service agents said, “you’re the smoothest con man that ever lived.”
The Count politely demurred with a smile. “I wouldn’t say that,” he replied. “After all, you have conned me.”
Despite being charged with multiple counts of possession of counterfeit currency and plates, Victor Lustig wasn’t done with the con game quite yet.
He was held at the Federal Detention Headquarters in New York, believed to be “escape proof” at the time, and scheduled to stand trial on September 2, 1935. But prison officials arrived at his cell on the third floor that day and were stunned. The Count had vanished in broad daylight.
Born in Austria-Hungary in 1890, Lustig, became fluent in several languages, and when he decided to see the world he thought: Where better to make money than aboard ocean liners packed with wealthy travelers?
Charming and poised at a young age, Lustig spent time making small talk with successful businessmen—and sizing up potential marks. Eventually, talk turned to the source of the Austrian’s wealth, and reluctantly he would reveal—in the utmost confidence—that he had been using a “money box.”
Eventually, he would agree to show the contraption privately. He just happened to be traveling with it. It resembled a steamer trunk, crafted of mahogany but fitted with sophisticated-looking printing machinery within.
Lustig would demonstrate the money box by inserting an authentic hundred-dollar bill, and after a few hours of “chemical processing,” he’d extract two seemingly authentic hundred-dollar bills.
He had no trouble passing them aboard the ship. It wasn’t long before his wealthy new friends would inquire as to how they too might be able to come into possession of a money box.
Reluctantly again, the Count would consider parting with it if the price was right, and it wasn’t uncommon for several potential buyers to bid against one another over several days at sea. Lustig was, if nothing else, patient and cautious.
He would usually end up parting (at the end of the voyages) with the device for the sum of $10,000—sometimes two and three times that amount. He would pack the machine with several hundred-dollar bills, and after any last-minute suspicions had been allayed through successful test runs, the Count would disappear.
Please Read on via The Smoothest Con Man That Ever Lived | History | Smithsonian.