Treating Coulrophobia: The fear of Clowns.

Clowns line up during the 22nd Latin American clown convention at Revolución monument, Mexico.
Image Credit: Photograph by Edgard Garrido/Reuters.
In order to be able to treat coulrophobia, one needs to analyze what is the origin of clown phobia:
• Is it the fear of unknown?
• The fact that behind the smiley face there could be anyone?
• Is it that the clown has no social norms, can break up barriers of interaction and that makes one person uncomfortable with them?
• Or is it a childhood experience?
• Maybe a movie?
In a broader sense even Charlie Chaplin could be catalogued as a clown because of his characters, but there is no fear of Chaplin.
Is it just the mask that makes the difference?
Unfortunately there is no cure for clown phobia. It depends on each person.
But if coulrophobia is something you can’t live without, you should gradually accommodate yourself to the idea of clowns.
Maybe first watch some videos of clowns performing funny acts over the internet.
Sometimes, clowns putting their make up in front of the public can help relieve the tension of some coulrophobiacs as they can see it is just a mask, and they could see the real person behind the mask.
With some people, this is just enough, but obviously this cannot be possible in every social situation.
The fear of clowns is not something you should be ashamed of.
Many people share the same fear and if you have any positive experience in overcoming your fear, share it below so that fellow coulrophobes can learn too.
Source: Coulrophobia treatment – COULROPHOBIA: The fear of Clowns

“My Coulrophobia”.

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What is “Coulrophobia”?
It is the irrational fear of Clowns.
Since it is not an old phobia, but one that has increased in recent decades, little is known about coulrophobia.
Scientists and doctors now agree that it is a result of not knowing who lies behind the excessive makeup, red nose and hair color.
Some researchers believe that coulrophobia cases increased after the 1990s, when Steven Spielberg classic horror film “IT” depicting a murderous clown was released.
Social implications
The phobia can cause a state of panic, difficulty in breathing, irregular heartbeat, sweating, nausea and feelings of fear.
Coulrphobia may seem absurd for some, however, many people suffer so much, that it prevents them from eating a hamburger in that famous fast food chain.
It is not a trivial matter either and coulrophobia shouldn’t be treated lightly.
Although the fear of clowns develops most of the time during childhood, when children are very sensitive to an unfamiliar face, it is also prevalent amongst adults.
My Pathetic Story:
I have had Coulrophobia since being a child when my Dad took me to a small Aussie circus behind the Maid of Auckland Hotel on South Road, Edwardstown in South Australia.
It would have been in the mid 1950s.
Apart from falling down between those horrid walk boards while I was trying to find my seat I was terrorised by an evil looking Clown with a stick and a rubber horn. He scared me shitless.
He barked like a dog and I was so terrified that I screamed like a little girlie and ran away and have been mortified by Clowns ever since.
Being shoved out the front of the crowd at John Martin’s Christmas Pageant and having poorly made up clowns blowing trumpets and poking balloons in my face didn’t help either.
At least they could have offered some hard boiled sweets.
People thought I was joking when I couldn’t bear to watch “Bozo” or was it “Bobo” the Clown on Channel 9 Kid’s Television in the late 1950s in Adelaide?
It’s all true you know and strangely enough my nine year old grandson Seamus is now a sufferer.
Am I responsible for that?
Rod Parham

“Why are Clowns so Scary?”

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Children are frightened by clown-themed decor in hospitals, a survey suggests. How did the smiley circus entertainers become a horror staple?
Anyone who has read Stephen King’s “It” would probably never choose to decorate a children’s ward with clowns.
And it probably comes as no surprise to horror fans that a University of Sheffield study of 250 children for a report on hospital design suggests the children find clown motifs “frightening and unknowable”.
It is the fear of the mask, the fact that it doesn’t change and is relentlessly comical
One might suspect that popular culture is to blame.
In It, made into a television movie in 1990 and re-made as a cinema release in 2017 Stephen King created a child-murdering monster that appeared as a demonic clown.
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King’s It has sparked a slew of schlocky movies over the past 20 years, known as the killer clown or evil clown genre.
Examples include Clownhouse from 1990 where three boys at home alone are menaced by escaped mental patients who have taken on the identities of clowns they have killed.
S.I.C.K., Killjoy and the Camp Blood Trilogy are other low-budget examples of the genre.
But perhaps the highlight is 1988’s Killer Klowns from Outer Space, with the tagline “In Space No One Can Eat Ice Cream”.
via BBC News – Why are clowns scary?.

Archduke Franz Ferdinand shot 8 defenceless Koalas whilst in Australia.

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Archduke Franz Ferdinand is best known as the man whose assassination is widely believed to have led to the outbreak of World War I.

“Ferdinand, heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, was a vain, impulsive man, of limited intelligence, given to unrealistic ideas about the future of the empire,” wrote Paul Ham in his book about the assassination.
Groomed to inherit the title of emperor from his uncle, Franz Joseph, Ferdinand began a military career but spent most of his time travelling or hunting.
Franz Ferdinand in Australia
In May 1893 he visited Australia on the cruiser Kaiserin Elizabeth, the pride of the Austro-Hungarian navy.
After a 21-gun salute on arrival, the party paid a visit to the Australian Museum before spending the rest of the trip in relative seclusion, The Argus newspaper reported at the time.
“There was no ceremony of any kind, the Archduke having expressed his desire to land incognito,” reported The Argus.
“The party, dressed as ordinary tourists, seated themselves in two cabs which had been waiting about, and drove off without there having been as much as a cheer or the waving of a single handkerchief.”
During the visit, Ferdinand travelled by train to the country town of Narromine for some shooting, stopping at Wentworth Falls, Blackheath and Bathurst in western New South Wales to enjoy the scenery.
He was also the guest of a Mr Badgery in Moss Vale, who introduced the archduke to koalas. Ferdinand managed to shoot at least eight of the poor blighters.
Eleven days after arriving, the archduke left Australia, his ship laden with dead wildlife, including a harmless platypus.
via Archduke Franz Ferdinand: The man whose assassination is blamed for triggering World War I – ABC News 

“Clownville” by Eolo Perfidio.

Eolo-Perfido-Clownville-topThe frightening Clownville series, created by photographer Eolo Perfido in collaboration with the make-up artist Valeria Orlando, featuring strange and disturbing clowns straight out of a horror movie or a Stephen King book. Eolo-Perfido-Clownville-19
Perfect to add some fuel to your darkest nightmares! 
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Read and See more via Clownville – Portraits of scary clowns by photographer Eolo Perfido | Ufunk.net.

Dan Rice, America’s Famous Circus Clown of the 1860s.

A clown ran for public office – and no, that’s not the beginning of a joke.
On Sept. 15, 1864, America’s most famous circus clown, Dan Rice, accepted the Democratic nomination for the Pennsylvania State Senate.
And it was just his first foray into politics: Even while continuing his career as a clown, a state convention later considered him as a candidate for Congress, and, in 1867, he made a brief but legitimate run for president.
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Dan Rice
While the idea of a clown running for office sounds like a gimmick, in the 1860s it was taken seriously — because circus itself was taken seriously, as adult fare.
Long before it was relegated to children’s entertainment, early circus in this country combined what appealed to grown-up tastes: sex, violence, political commentary and, in a horse-based culture, top-notch horsemanship.
George Washington attended the first circus in 1793 in Philadelphia not for family-friendly amusement — a notion that didn’t emerge until the 1880s — but as a horseman keen to see animals and humans working together at a peak level.
Sex and violence enhanced the appeal. Like later burlesque comedians, talking clowns told dirty jokes in a titillating whirl of the scantily clad: Circus acrobats and riders showed more skin — or flesh-colored fabric that seemed to be skin — than could be seen anywhere else in public life.
Read on via The Civil War’s Most Famous Clown – NYTimes.com.