Washoe Theater, Anaconda 1936.

It may only show one movie at a time, but this quaint theater is not to be missed.
It was the last theater in the United States constructed in the Nuevo Deco style, a form of Art Deco that also features elements of Art Nouveau.
The Washoe Theater was designed circa 1930 by B. Marcus Priteca, the architect of the Hollywood Pantages theater, and built in 1936 during the Great Depression.
The space was designed to feature near-perfect acoustics, which was an impressive feat of engineering as the theater opened at a time when films with sound were still relatively new.
The space itself is just as much of an attraction as the movies. Its walls boast ornate reliefs and accents.
Copper details pay homage to the mining industry that once dominated the city. The curtain, which is made of silk and covered with a painting of deer, is so old and beautiful that workers are hesitant to take it down for cleaning or restoration in case it falls apart.
The historic theater sits in the middle of the former mining city of Anaconda. At the beginning of the 20th century, Anaconda was one of the world’s largest processors of copper.
As such, it had a hefty population of immigrants working its mines and smelter. The miners were eager to be entertained after a hard day, and the Washoe Theater provided a reprieve from their grueling work.
Today, people can still pop into this delightful feature from the city’s past. The experience of seeing a movie in such a historic place is a treat for anyone visiting this corner of Montana.
Source: Washoe Theater – Anaconda, Montana – Atlas Obscura

The Gas-Lit Hyde Park Picture House in Leeds.

The Hyde Park Picture House, the world’s only surviving gas-lit cinema, opened in 1914.
The owners of the Grade II-listed building have now been granted planning permission for redevelopment, to improve accessibility, restore the gas lights and ornate plasterwork and incorporate a second screen in the basement.

Source: The Hyde Park Picture House in Leeds – in pictures | UK news | The Guardian

The Golden Age of American Cinemas.

150629-bohbotcinemas-05_1Photo by Franck Bohbot
Photographer Franck Bohbot is a master of interior and exterior spaces.
Whether it’s his attention-grabbing photographs of French pools, grand libraries, or humble basketball courts, for me, it was hard to decide which photo series to interview him about.
In the end, I gravitated toward his pictures of American movie theaters because they seemed to evoke a familiar narrative—old Hollywood and the golden days of film.150629-bohbotcinemas-06_1
The Crest, Westwood, Lobby, Los Angeles, California, 2014
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The American Cinematheque at the Egyptian Theatre, Los Angeles, California
It’s no easy feat to take an empty space—devoid of people, animals, or weather—and make it shine, but every theater comes to life in Bohbot’s imagination. He originally became interested in the visual arts through cinema before his interests turned to photography, which is now one of his great passions.
While working on a project on French theaters, Bohbot stumbled on the Max Linder Panorama, which he calls “a famous venue and a beautiful Parisian movie theater.
I told myself that one day I would travel to the U.S. and photograph the movie theaters built during the golden age of Hollywood in the 1930s and 1940s.

Read on via A Night at the Cinema: Reviving the Glamour of Old Hollywood | PROOF.

Cinema on Ice, Greenland.

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On his most recent trip to Greenland, photographer Ciril Jazbec witnessed something magical—a photographic experience that made his “hairs stand on end.”
He was there working on his project, On Thin Ice, a chapter in a larger body of work chronicling the effects of climate change on communities in low-lying regions.
While in Uummannaq, (which is surprisingly the eleventh-largest town in Greenland, even with a population of about 1,200 people) Jazbec came across Children’s Home Uummannaq.
Speaking with the director, he learned that one of the ways the facility helps children is by “involving them in the traditional way of life, connecting them with hunters and fishermen”—the sort of cultural traditions often affected by changing weather patterns and globalization, and right in the crux of Jazbec’s goal of putting a human face on climate change.
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One night, Children’s Home arranged to take the kids on a special outing—“We decided to head to the ice—to the frozen-over sea—to project Inuk, a Greenlandic language film, onto an iceberg,” Ciril says.
The film is especially relevant because of its cast of “nonprofessional Inuit actors”—seal hunters and youth from a local children’s home—and its narrative highlighting the tension between tradition and modernity present in contemporary Greenland.
See more Images via Ciril Jazbec’s Cinema on Ice | PROOF.

France’s Eden Theatre Restored, La Ciotat, near Marseille.

Eden-exterior-afterThe world’s oldest surviving public movie theater, the Eden Theatre in the town of La Ciotat 20 miles east of Marseille on the south coast of France, has been restored and reopened after 30 years of neglect.
In a gala opening this little town’s prominent place in film history was reclaimed with a showing of some of the first moving pictures ever filmed, shot in 1895 by the Lumière brothers in La Ciotat’s summer sun.
In 1892, Antoine Lumière, father of the soon-to-be-famous brothers, had a seaside mansion built in La Ciotat. A friend of his had introduced him to the town and he had fallen in love with its charms.
After construction on the Tuscan-style villa known as Château Lumière was completed in 1893, entire family spent summers there. The timing was ideal to make the sleepy town of 12,000 a dominant figure in movie history.
According to one popular view of events, Antoine saw Edison’s Kinetoscope in Paris in 1894 and suggested to his sons that they look into improving on Edison’s device which was heavy, dependent on electricity and only allowed one person at a time to view the motion picture through a peephole.
Within months, Louis had invented combination device that shot the film, developed it and projected it.
The brothers patented the Cinématographe on February 13th, 1895, using the name of an earlier recording and projecting device patented by Léon Bouly in February of 1892.
By 1894 Bouly could no longer afford the fees to renew his patents, so the Lumière’s snapped up the name.
Some historians believe Louis took more than just the name from Bouly’s device, but if so, he improved upon it drastically. Louis insisted he came up with the idea all on his own, denying even the story about his father and the Kinetoscope.
On March 22nd, 1895, the first movie audience witnessed La Sortie de l’Usine (“Exiting the factory”), less than a minute of footage of workers, mainly women, leaving the Lumière photographic plate factory in Lyons shot three days before the showing.
This demonstration took place in Paris for a private audience at the Société d’Encouragement pour l’Industrie Nationale (Society for the Encouragement of National Industry).
from The History Blog.

Musée Miniature et Cinéma, France.

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by danielrthorne
Robocop, tiny urban alleys, and gremlins are all just a part of the fascinating prop and miniature set collection held at the Musée Miniature et Cinéma.
Founded by miniature setting artist Dan Ohlmann, the museum holds over a thousand pieces of down-scaled locations such as a school room and a fully-furnished dining room which are so detailed that they could pass for their full-size inspirations.
The site also includes such tiny tchotchkes as carved matchsticks, chiseled egg shells, and micro-origami.
In addition to all of the tiny pieces of sculpture the museum’s other focus is on special effects and creatures from the movies.
In this section of the museum visitors can see props and costumes from such films as I, Robot, Stuart Little, and Hellboy.
Even with all of the micro amazements, the excitement the Musée Miniature et Cinéma is immense.
Edited by: Martin, Rachel (Admin), Dylan (Admin), EricGrundhauser (Editor)
via Musée Miniature et Cinéma | Atlas Obscura.