The Baby Jumping Festival of Castrillo de Murcia.

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The Baby Jumping Festival – Photo by Celestebombin on Wikipedia | Copyright: Creative Commons
Whereas most Catholics are baptized into their religion as infants by being gently dunked under cleansing waters, absolving them of their innate original sin, in the Spanish village of Castrillo de Murcia fresh babes are laid in the street as men dressed in traditional devil costumes run around jumping over them, terrorizing onlookers.
The yearly festival known locally as “El Colacho” takes place during the village’s religious feast of Corpus Christi.
No concrete origin for the bizarre ritual exists, but it dates back to at least the early 1600s.
During the holiday parents with children born during the previous year bring the little tikes out and place them in neat rows of pillows spaced out down a public street.
Then, while the excited parents look on, men dressed in bright yellow costumes, and grotesque masks begin filing through the crowd, whipping bystanders with switches and generally terrorizing everyone.
But this is all fun and games as the main event is when these “devils” run down the street jumping over the rows of babies like Olympic hurdlers.
Once the little sinners have been jumped over they are considered absolved of man’s original transgression, and they are sprinkled with rose petals before being taken away by their (likely very relieved) parents.
While there are no reports of injuries or babalities caused by the flying devils, the strange practice is frowned upon by the clergy of the Catholic Church with the Pope going so far as to ask the Spanish people to distance themselves from the ritual.
However El Colacho continues to take place each year.
No one can tell this village that they can’t send their devil-men careening over helpless infants.
Edited by: Allison (Admin), EricGrundhauser (Admin)
via The Baby Jumping Festival | Atlas Obscura.

Ned Parfelt, Newsboy & Soldier, 1896-1918

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The newsboy was Ned Parfett, born in 1896, and one of four brothers from Cornwall Road, Waterloo.
Tragically, six and a half years after this picture was taken, Ned was killed while serving with the British army in France. He was 22.
Ned enlisted in the Royal Field Artillery in 1916, serving as a despatch driver then moving onto reconnaissance duties.
He was awarded the Military Medal and mentioned in despatches for his gallant conduct during a series of missions at the front.
He died on 29 October 1918, just two weeks before the end of the war, when a shell landed on the Quartermaster’s stores as he was picking up some clothes before going on leave.
After his death, the officer who recommended Ned for special recognition wrote to one of his brothers:
‘On many occasions he accompanied me during severe shelling and I always placed the greatest confidence in him.’
Ned Parfett is buried in the British war cemetery at Verchain-Maugré in France.
via Titanic | The National Archives.

‘At World’s End’.

 ‘At World’s End’ Image Credit: Photograph by Alessandra Meniconzi.
Every year, the Siena International Photo Awards share the best images of the most beautiful and unique places, people, and events on Earth.
The pictures are submitted by some amazing photographers from around the globe who want to share how they see and perceive the world.
The images are placed under fitting categories and the winners for each topic are chosen.
The categories include Journeys & Adventures, Fascinating Faces And Characters, Fragile Ice, General Monochrome and others.
See more wonderful images via The Best Pictures Of 2017 Siena International Photo Awards Have Been Announced, And They’re Truly Powerful | Bored Panda

Big Dogs and Small Kids.

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“Little Kids and Their Big Dogs” is a heartwarming photography project by Andy Seliverstoff that focuses on the unbreakable bond between little children and their supersized dogs.
The photographer, 58, spent four months taking thousands of pictures in St Petersburg before compiling a book from the hundred best images.

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Andy has been a photographer for years but he’s only recently started to take it seriously.
He has a particular fondness for dogs, Great Danes especially, although his canine subjects also include Briads, Newfoundlands, and Black Russian Terriers.
“I always take plenty of time with the dog who’s in front of my camera so I get to know the personality of my dog model the best I can,” writes the photographer on his website.

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“The personality and the character is unique for every individual dog.
The human aspects we often recognize in our dogs are, among other things, what makes us feel so close to them. 

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See more dogs and kids via Little Kids And Their Big Dogs | Bored Panda

The Baby who Loved Lemons, c.1948.

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One day when he was 9 months old Michael Thomas Roesle was squirming on his mother’s lap while she tried to serve tea to a neighbor.
Inevitably Michael Thomas got his hands on a slice of lemon and popped it into his mouth.
A gargantuan pucker swept across his face, wrinkling it like an old prune.
But Michael Thomas manfully continued to chew.
Then he reached eagerly for another slice. Now his parents, who live in Richmond, Caliornia, have to keep a bag of lemons handy all the time . . . and Michael Thomas eats them by the dozen.
In fact, he picks them over chocolate ice-cream cones 10 times out of 10.
So — here’s to Michael Thomas, and the countless other kids everywhere who manage, simply by being themselves, to confound all expectations and make life so perfectly, marvelously unpredictable.
via Sour Power: Here’s to the Little Boy Who Loved to Eat Lemons | LIFE.com.