The Iconic Photograph ‘Candy Cigarette’ 1989.

Sally Mann’s Candy Cigarette is one of the most iconic photographs of the 20th century.
Featuring a young pre-teen girl gazing directly into the camera, cigarette in hand, the image is striking and resonates with the viewer in its drastic colour contrasts.
Through her clever use of background images and subtle body language, Mann is perhaps telling the story of a defiant young woman straying from the straight and narrow path.
Source: “Candy Cigarette” (1989) by Sally Mann ~ vintage everyday

Children play in magical Kew Gardens, London.

London, England
A charming photograph of Children playing inside an area designed to look like a badger set during a photo call at Kew Gardens.
The Kew Gardens summer festival includes a newly-opened 16 hectare area of woodland and a wild flower meadow.
Image Credit: Photograph by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
Source: The 20 photographs of the week | Art and design | The Guardian

Hine’s Photos of Child Labourers, 1913.

Between 1908 and 1911, the photographer and social reformer Lewis Hine travelled the U.S. for the National Child Labor Committee (NCLC) documenting child labor — in factories, textile mills, canneries, and coal mines — focusing in particular on the Carolina Piedmont.
Amongst the hundreds of photographs he made in this time is this unique set of composite photographs of Southern cotton mill workers.
Each image was created by purposively rephotographing several workers upon the same photographic plate. The idea of overlaying portraits in this way was not without precedent.
The technique was invented in 1880s by Sir Francis Galton who used multiple exposures to create an “average” portrait from many different faces.
For Galton, the primary purpose of the method was so as to advance his views on human ideal types, and it could be argued that Hine used it in a similar way (albeit divorced from the somewhat suspect context of phrenology), to generalise his observations regarding the damaging physical effects of the back-breaking factory work on young bodies.
However, the fact that Hine overlays faces of quite different physicality perhaps implies a subtler motive, one perhaps more orientated around the haunting quality of the final image.
The composites were never published in Hine’s lifetime, although the portraits of the same children used in the process do appear in posters for the NCLC alongside such headlines as “Making Human Junk: Shall Industry Be Allowed To Put This Cost On Society?”.
In general, Hine’s heart-rending images from his time with the NCLC — often the result of putting himself at great personal danger — helped to influence the change in several laws, including the Keating-Owen Child Labor Act of 1916.
[Source] From: Library of Congress
Source: Lewis Hine’s Composite Photographs of Child Labourers (1913) | The Public Domain Review

Baby Elephant & youngsters go on show at Zoo.

Pittsburgh, United States
Young visitors peer against the glass at the Pittsburgh Zoo to get a closer look at a four-week-old baby elephant as it meets the public for the very first time.
Image Credit: Photograph by Andrew Rush/AP.
Source: Best photos of the day: wildfires and parade of giants | News | The Guardian

A young Girl sings for her Dog.

Girl Playing for Her Dog.
Kids today might find this hard to believe, but there really was a period in time when smartphones didn’t exist.
“But how did they entertain themselves?” we hear you cry. “How did they survive without instant and constant access to hilarious videos of cats being cats and people failing at stuff?”
Well, actually, they managed just fine. Check out these vintage pictures of children enjoying themselves before mobile phones were invented to see what we mean.
Compiled by Bored Panda, the list serves as an important reminder that all you really need to enjoy yourself is a little bit of imagination.
See more images via 10+ Historical Pics Of Kids Playing Reveal How Much Technology Has Changed Our Childhood | Bored Panda