Young Esme’s Anti-Littering Message.

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Germantown Friends School second grader Esme Fa Harrison helps install her artwork at the corner of Germantown Ave. and W. Coulter St.
by Brian Hickey
Esme Fa Harrison, an adorably introspective Germantown Friends School second grader, just saw a picture she’d drawn last year become a work of “street art” outside her school.
via Second Grader’s Drawing Becomes Anti-Littering ‘Street Art’ in Germantown | NBC 10 Philadelphia.

The Baby who Loved Lemons, c.1948.

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One day when he was 9 months old Michael Thomas Roesle was squirming on his mother’s lap while she tried to serve tea to a neighbor.
Inevitably Michael Thomas got his hands on a slice of lemon and popped it into his mouth.
A gargantuan pucker swept across his face, wrinkling it like an old prune.
But Michael Thomas manfully continued to chew.
Then he reached eagerly for another slice. Now his parents, who live in Richmond, Caliornia, have to keep a bag of lemons handy all the time . . . and Michael Thomas eats them by the dozen.
In fact, he picks them over chocolate ice-cream cones 10 times out of 10.
So — here’s to Michael Thomas, and the countless other kids everywhere who manage, simply by being themselves, to confound all expectations and make life so perfectly, marvelously unpredictable.
via Sour Power: Here’s to the Little Boy Who Loved to Eat Lemons | LIFE.com.

Life in Arctic Bay, Canada.

A photographer’s journey into the Canadian Arctic reveals the vibrancy of life in one of the coldest inhabited regions on the planet.
In early November the sun dips below the horizon in Arctic Bay and the sky bruises violet and blue.
The sun won’t rise again here for three months, plunging the landscape into infinite twilight.
Amid tundra and sea, Nunavut (“our land” in Inuktitut) is the largest and northernmost territory of Canada, where a majority of the country’s Inuit population cluster in remote coastal communities.
Photographer and Fulbright grantee Acacia Johnson embraced one of the coldest and darkest winters on Earth in order to document the Inuit’s evolving relationship with their environment in her dreamlike series, Under the Same Stars.
“The only constant thing about the Arctic landscape is that it’s constantly changing,” Johnson says. “My [original] idea was to do this landscape project … I showed up and the reality is quite different from what you imagine. Instead, it seemed more important for me to focus on the cultural transition happening there.”
The faces of the Tatatoapik family glow under the light of the full moon. Each of their parkas has been sewn by women in the family.
Image Credit: Photographs by ACACIA JOHNSON.
Source: Dreamy Photographs Illuminate Life in Dark Arctic Winters | Travel | National Geographic Australia – National Geographic

The Chaos Of Being A Parent.

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Traditional family photos are shiny, peaceful and nice to look at, but they rarely depict reality.
After another photoshoot of a family with little kids turned into total chaos, photographer Danielle Guenther decided she should try to depict what parents are really going through
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After posting a few of these images on her website and Facebook, she quickly started getting requests from parents, asking to photoshoot their own chaos. “Parenthood is messy, but wow, the unflattering side can still be so beautiful,” – says Danielle, who is also a mom of a 5-year-old herself.
She urges to “capture the moment, because in the end, all we have are the memories…“
More info: danielleguentherphotography.com | Facebook
See more Images via Photographer Reveals The True Chaos Of Being A Parent | Bored Panda.

Ned Parfelt, Newsboy & Soldier, 1896-1918

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The newsboy was Ned Parfett, born in 1896, and one of four brothers from Cornwall Road, Waterloo.
Tragically, six and a half years after this picture was taken, Ned was killed while serving with the British army in France. He was 22.
Ned enlisted in the Royal Field Artillery in 1916, serving as a despatch driver then moving onto reconnaissance duties.
He was awarded the Military Medal and mentioned in despatches for his gallant conduct during a series of missions at the front.
He died on 29 October 1918, just two weeks before the end of the war, when a shell landed on the Quartermaster’s stores as he was picking up some clothes before going on leave.
After his death, the officer who recommended Ned for special recognition wrote to one of his brothers:
‘On many occasions he accompanied me during severe shelling and I always placed the greatest confidence in him.’
Ned Parfett is buried in the British war cemetery at Verchain-Maugré in France.
via Titanic | The National Archives.

The Iconic Photograph ‘Candy Cigarette’ 1989.

Sally Mann’s Candy Cigarette is one of the most iconic photographs of the 20th century.
Featuring a young pre-teen girl gazing directly into the camera, cigarette in hand, the image is striking and resonates with the viewer in its drastic colour contrasts.
Through her clever use of background images and subtle body language, Mann is perhaps telling the story of a defiant young woman straying from the straight and narrow path.
Source: “Candy Cigarette” (1989) by Sally Mann ~ vintage everyday