Baby Racing in the 1950s.

diaper-derby-baby-racing-12The annual event was held at a fairground in Palisades Park, New Jersey, from 1946 to 1955.
They were fiercely-fought competitions full of screaming, crying, and tantrums, but as one set of archived images reveals, baby-racing Diaper Derbies were in fact a popular spectator sport during the mid-twentieth century.
For some reason – probably health and safety gone mad – baby racing is no longer a thing you can go and see.
But these photos from the golden era of baby racing are amazing.

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Source: vintage everyday: Baby Racing Used To Be A Real Life Actual Sport During The Mid-20 Century, And It Was Amazing!

Pinocchio killed the Cricket in the Original.

pinocchioIllustrator: Enrico Mazzanti (1852-1910)
by Emily Upton.
You probably already knew that Disney has a habit of taking dark, twisted children’s fairy tales and turning them into sickeningly sweet happily-ever-afters. Take Sleeping Beauty for example: it’s based on a story where a married king finds a girl asleep, and can’t wake her so rapes her instead.
The 1940 version of Pinocchio is no exception. The movie is based on a story that appeared as a serial in a newspaper called The Adventures of Pinocchio, written in 1881 and 1882 by Carlo Collodi (pictured on front).
Jiminy Cricket appears as the Talking Cricket in the book, and does not play as prominent of a role.
He first appears in chapter 4 in which the truism that children do not like to have their behaviour corrected by people who know much more than they do is illustrated. Apropos, when the Talking Cricket tells Pinocchio to go back home:
At these last words, Pinocchio jumped up in a fury, took a hammer from the bench, and threw it with all his strength at the Talking Cricket.
Perhaps he did not think he would strike it. But, sad to relate, my dear children, he did hit the Cricket, straight on its head.
With a last weak “cri-cri-cri” the poor Cricket fell from the wall, dead!
You might be happy to know that Pinocchio did learn his lesson quite soon after that—or seemed to.
While he didn’t seem to feel bad about killing the cricket (in fact, he later tells Gepetto, “It was his own fault, for I didn’t want to kill him.”), he did seem to regret not taking the cricket’s advice as he runs into more and more trouble. At last, karma catches up to Pinocchio and he gets his feet burned off.
As he no longer had any strength left with which to stand, he sat down on a little stool and put his two feet on the stove to dry them. There he fell asleep, and while he slept, his wooden feet began to burn.
Slowly, very slowly, they blackened and turned to ashes.
Don’t worry—Gepetto forgives him and builds him new feet, which is really more than Pinocchio deserves.
You see, when Pinocchio first became “alive” and learned to walk, the first thing he did was run off.
What’s worse is that Pinocchio leads people to believe that Gepetto has abused him, which lands Gepetto squarely in prison.
Read on via In the Original Story, Pinocchio killed Jiminy Cricket, Got His Feet Burnt Off, and was Hanged and Left for Dead.

The Jaws Baby Crib.

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In a darkly humorous homage to classic cinema, Joseph Reginella, a toy and set-prop sculptor based in New York, has created an awesome crib that makes it look like the baby sleeping in it is about to be devoured by the monstrous shark from Jaws.
The sculpture is a reenactment of the scene where the grizzled seaman Quint is devoured by the movie’s eponymous terror.
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Reginella made the bed for his nephew, Mikey Melaccio.
Looks like the kid might develop either an extreme fear of sharks or an affinity for them!
See more Images via Uncle Makes Jaws-Inspired Crib For His 2-Month-Old Nephew | Bored Panda.

Recreating Childhood Drawings.

This is ‘Kiddie Arts’, a series of digital paintings by Dutch artist Telmo Pieper inspired by the drawings he made when he was four.
Clearly, his technique has improved significantly since then. Have I ever told you in kindergarten I got an ‘Unsatisfactory’ in coloring because I couldn’t stay inside the lines?
Can you believe they even graded coloring?
The teacher met with my parents and they we’re all, “Yeah? Well maybe our son likes to think outside the box!” even though I knew they were super disappointed.
Plus when we were learning the alphabet I wrote all the letters backwards. But look at me now! “Even worse.” By like ten-fold.
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via Artist Recreates His Childhood Drawings As An Adult | Geekologie.

Dame Talkative’s Old Sayings, c.1842

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Dame Talkative’s Old Sayings,  for the amusement of young people; 1824?; E. Wallis, London.
A book of wonderfully illustrated rhymes which, although they appear to be for children, often veer into the world of more adult themes.
As well as a few thefts, at one point a boy threatens to beat a snail “as black as a coal”, a lady-bird’s children are said to be possibly dying in a house-fire, and Margery Daw is called a “nasty slut”.
The book seems to have been first published in 1818, with this being a later edition (a pencilled note on the inside pages indicating a date of 1824).
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[Source] Housed at: Internet Archive | From: California Digital Library
[Rights] Underlying Work: PD Worldwide | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights
[Rights] Download: PDF
Download Links and Options Available via Dame Talkative’s Old Sayings (ca.1824) | The Public Domain Review.

An Asian Touch for Children’s Stories.

Obsidian-Disney-illustration-2An illustrator gives an Asian touch to European tales and Disney classics.
The creations of Na Young Wu, aka Obsidian, a Korean illustrator who likes to give a nice Asian touch to famous European tales and Disney classics with a beautiful series of illustrations, from The Little Mermaid to Snow White through Alice in Wonderland, The Beauty and the Beast, The Little Red Riding Hood or The Snow Queen.
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See many more beautiful Images via An illustrator gives an Asian touch to European tales and Disney classics | Ufunk.net.