Richard the Lionheart’s Castle.

Richard the Lionheart was once king of this imposing castle on the banks of the Seine that features in Kieron Connolly’s latest book, Abandoned Castles.
The world is littered with castles, once majestic but now standing as ghostly reminders to the way we once lived.
Château Gaillard was built on the banks of the Seine between 1196 and 1198 on the orders of Richard the Lionheart, (King of England and Duke of Normandy).
The stronghold – north-west of Paris – was as close as possible to the border between Richard’s Normandy and the territories of the French king.
It was supposed to be impregnable but fell to the French in 1204.
The chateau is among 100 forts featured in Abandoned Castles by Kieron Connolly (Amber Books,).
The world is littered with castles, once majestic but now standing as ghostly reminders to the way we once lived.
Image Credit: Photograph by Francis Cormon/Alamy
Source: Travel photo of the week: The Lionheart’s castle, Normandy | Travel | The Guardian

Paronella Castle, North Queensland.

Image Credit: Photograph: Tommaso Lizzul
Since childhood, baker José Paronella had dreamed of building a Moorish castle.
In 1913, the adventurous then 26-year-old left his village in Catalonia and moved to tropical northern Australia. There, he eventually found wealth as a sugar cane farmer, and was able to pursue his dream.
In 1929, Paronella purchased a plot of rainforest in Queensland and began building his castle by hand, using sand, clay, old train tracks, gravel from the nearby creek, and wood taken from abandoned houses.
By 1935, the structure had expanded to include a pool, cafe, cinema and ballroom, as well as tennis courts and villa gardens with a grand staircase – all open to the public.
After Paronella’s death in 1948, the building suffered decades of neglect, but conservation efforts mean the castle is alive again.
Lush tropical plants have encroached upon and mingled with Paronella’s hand-built stairs and fountains, making them look like they sprouted from their natural surroundings.
• paronellapark.com.au
via 10 of the world’s most unusual wonders – chosen by Atlas Obscura | Travel | The Guardian

Magic of Quninta da Regaleira.

Palace-of-Mystery-Quinta-da-Regaleira-by-Taylor-Moore7__880I am a Canadian photographer Taylor Moore.
I have captured the magic and mystery of the legendary ‘Quinta da Regaleira’ located in the UNESCO village of Sintra, Portugal.
Palace-of-Mystery-Quinta-da-Regaleira-by-Taylor-Moore5__880
‘Regaleira’ built by (the owner) Antonio Augusto Carvalho Monteiro in conjunction with the renowned Italian opera set designer and architect Luigi Manini.
These two noblemen conspired to create a place of divine magic and mystery embodying a combination of styles including Roman, Gothic, Renaissance and Manueline.
I think that with underground caves, lakes, towers, and endless gardens the place is incredible to photograph day or night.
More info: sintramagic.com | Facebook
Palace-of-Mystery-Quinta-da-Regaleira-by-Taylor-Moore__880
via The Palace Of Mystery: My Pictures Of “Quinta Da Regaleira” | Bored Panda.

Dunluce Castle, County Antrim.

7164
Dunluce Castle, Co Antrim, Northern Ireland.
Category: nature.
I was due to catch a train and didn’t have much time, so I just took a few pictures quickly.
When I got home I reluctantly inserted the memory card and I saw this picture.
And I hadn’t even realised there was cloud like that on the day.
Photograph: Rashid Khaidanov/National Geographic Traveller UK
Source: National Geographic Traveller photography competition finalists | Travel | The Guardian

Fire & Ice Castle by Sam Scholes.

1256

Fire ball in the ice castle. (Photo by Sam Scholes/Caters News)
Published by dmitry in Art
A photographer has discovered a spectacular way of keeping warm during winter – using fire to heat up icy locations.
Sam Scholes uses long-exposures to capture the movement of fire in front of ice-covered backdrops.
3146
Light swirl in the ice castle. (Photo by Sam Scholes/Caters News)
After lighting steel wool his friend Scott Stringham swings the flaming object in order to make swirling patterns.
The result of this technique – captured at Midway Ice Castles in Utah is a vibrant image with the warm light dancing across the cold scenes.
via Magical Fire and Ice Castle » Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society..

Bishop’s Medieval Castle, Colorado.

5109543880_e1cacc8888_b

Image Credit Flickr User LePhotography
Colorado, San Isabel National Forest – the heart of what many call Cowboy Country. Yet stray of the beaten path and you come across Bishop castle – a 160-foot high structure that weighs in at an estimated 50 thousand tons.
Incredibly, it is the work of a single man – Jim Bishop. Strangely though, if you are a tourist to the state, you will not find a mention of Bishop Castle on any official brochure.
That’s a shame because the place is magnificent. You might be forgiven that for believing that you had stumbled upon the home of the Colorado branch of the Addams family or perhaps a set mock up for a Tolkien inspired movie.
With the wrought iron, dragon’s head and formidable masonry it even has the look of a post apocalyptic stronghold for survivors. Yet it is a family home.
via Bishop’s Castle – Medieval Castle in Cowboy Country ~ Kuriositas.