The Magic of Quninta da Regaleira.

Palace-of-Mystery-Quinta-da-Regaleira-by-Taylor-Moore7__880I am a Canadian photographer Taylor Moore.
I have captured the magic and mystery of the legendary ‘Quinta da Regaleira’ located in the UNESCO village of Sintra, Portugal.
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‘Regaleira’ built by (the owner) Antonio Augusto Carvalho Monteiro in conjunction with the renowned Italian opera set designer and architect Luigi Manini.
These two noblemen conspired to create a place of divine magic and mystery embodying a combination of styles including Roman, Gothic, Renaissance and Manueline.
I think that with underground caves, lakes, towers, and endless gardens the place is incredible to photograph day or night.
More info: sintramagic.com | Facebook
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via The Palace Of Mystery: My Pictures Of “Quinta Da Regaleira” | Bored Panda.

Richard the Lionheart’s Castle.

Richard the Lionheart was once king of this imposing castle on the banks of the Seine that features in Kieron Connolly’s latest book, Abandoned Castles.
The world is littered with castles, once majestic but now standing as ghostly reminders to the way we once lived.
Château Gaillard was built on the banks of the Seine between 1196 and 1198 on the orders of Richard the Lionheart, (King of England and Duke of Normandy).
The stronghold – north-west of Paris – was as close as possible to the border between Richard’s Normandy and the territories of the French king.
It was supposed to be impregnable but fell to the French in 1204.
The chateau is among 100 forts featured in Abandoned Castles by Kieron Connolly (Amber Books,).
The world is littered with castles, once majestic but now standing as ghostly reminders to the way we once lived.
Image Credit: Photograph by Francis Cormon/Alamy
Source: Travel photo of the week: The Lionheart’s castle, Normandy | Travel | The Guardian

Neuschwanstein Castle, Schwangau, Bavaria.

Sleeping Beauty Castle at Disneyland, Cinderella Castle at the Magic Kingdom and numerous other magical castles were all inspired by a real castle: Neuschwanstein Castle, the awe-inspiring retreat of the “fairy-tale king,” Ludwig II of Bavaria.
Commissioned by the king in homage to Richard Wagner, the fantastical castle was designed by theatrical set designer Christian Jank.
The first stone of Neuschwanstein Castle (which literally means, “New Swan Stone palace”) was laid in September 1869. The technology used to build this castle was considered modern and advanced.
New inventions such as electricity, plumbing, heat and steamboats were used in the construction of the castle, and Ludwig himself was considered responsible for the introduction of many of these inventions to the area.

In 1886, as the massively expensive castle neared completion, the State Commissioner pronounced Ludwig insane and arrested him soon after. The day after he was arrested, Ludwig requested the Commissioner go on a walk in the woods with him.
The commissioner agreed and told his guards to stay behind. Both were found mysteriously dead in a lake later that evening.
Ludwig was never able to see the finalised castle, but his taste for elegant, and extravagant, design resonates throughout the interior of the castle.
After his death, the castle was opened for the public to help pay off the expenses and now attracts over a million people a year.
Of particular delight is the Grotto Room, an artificial cave complete with stalactites and a waterfall; it was intended to represent a cave from Wagner’s opera “Tannhauser.”
Source: Neuschwanstein Castle – Schwangau, Germany – Atlas Obscura

Dunluce Castle, County Antrim.

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Dunluce Castle, Co Antrim, Northern Ireland.
Category: nature.
I was due to catch a train and didn’t have much time, so I just took a few pictures quickly.
When I got home I reluctantly inserted the memory card and I saw this picture.
And I hadn’t even realised there was cloud like that on the day.
Photograph: Rashid Khaidanov/National Geographic Traveller UK
Source: National Geographic Traveller photography competition finalists | Travel | The Guardian