The Running Board was Perfect for your Dog in the 1930s.

Back in the 1930s if you didn’t want your dog riding inside your car, it could ride “safely” on a running board attached to the car.
When we debate the history of automobiles in America and around the world, we rarely hear anyone discussing the history of man’s best friend traveling alongside him. Actually, there weren’t many that put dogs in the front seat, which was probably the safest spot for their furry friends.
Much like the pooch in these pictures below, transport systems in early vehicles involved the running board. Some were simple running board–based boxes and shields while others, such as the Bird Dog’s Palace, were sturdy external steel enclosure

The latter were quite elaborate. They came in several sizes and included a barred door that could be released without the driver leaving his seat and an oilcloth cover that could be unrolled and buttoned into place if the weather got bad.
The most terrifying and dangerous pet carrier must have been the dog sack, an actual canvas sack that (thankfully) had a head hole and was hooked and clamped to the side of the car.
via Running Boards: Traveling in Cars With Your Dogs in the 1930s ~ vintage everyday

Rick “Ricky” Bell.

32redcoupeside-scaled500Rick Bell (Maintenance Section) hated being called Ricky and didn’t like his surname used as a noun because he was called ‘Bellie” and things like ‘Dingdong’ at Primary School.
At least one of Ricks after hours passions was working on his cherry red Ford Coupe Tourer (with the Dicky seat). In the early years of his apprenticeship to Printing Engineering, he struggled to keep the original 1930s (something) engine going and bits like the clutch, brakes etc were also proving difficult as even items from the wreckers and Rare Spares dried up.
An offer from someone in the Bindery enticed Rick out of his Ford passion and into the new world of Holden. The offer was to take away for free, an EH Holden wagon with a 186 motor. Rick lived at O’Halloran Hill and the car was in Salisbury. I lived in Allchurch Ave. Kurralta Park with not much to do on weekends so offered to help.
We duly arrived at Salisbury in the Ford early one Saturday morning and had a look over the Holden. The head had been refurbished but was on the floor of the back seat. A heap of other ‘running gear’ was in buckets and tins on the passenger side front floor.
The owner said that the brakes worked a bit but you probably would need to rely more on the handbrake..
We attached a big ‘under tow’ sign to the Holden and slowly dragged the hulk back to Ricks place. Somehow. all went smoothly until we got about 1/2 way up Tapleys’ Hill, when the heat from the Ford’s exhaust pipe burnt though the tow rope.
The original gear on the Ford had the pipe coming out from the middle of the body under the back bumper. So I’m cut loose from the little Ford and running backwards down Tapleys Hill Rd, again (blessedly) not much traffic.
Finally instinct kicked in and I pulled the handbrake on. Made no difference. Pumped the footbrake. Made no difference. Threw the car into gear, something went BANG and I drifted at an angle into the side of the cutting. Rick stopped and ran back laughing his head off. I
told him about the loud noise under the bonnet and we put the bonnet up to find that the engine dismantlers had put all the other other U clamps, nuts and bolts, old valve stems etc in the top of the cylinder pots. When I put the can in gear, the pistons moved and pushed all the contents out onto the road.
Finally back at Ricks place, we took the engine out, cut the Holden body in 1/2s along is length and took it 1/2 at a time to the Happy Valley dump with windows and seats. By the time we got back with the 2nd half, the doors and seats had gone to a better homes. I’m thinking this was about 1972-1974.
When we wuzz yung ‘n’ dumb.
Grant Hofmeyer

A Perfect Companion for a Fancy Old Car.

Image Credit: Photograph by Myriam Beatriz Mahiques.
The perfect companion.
When I came back to my car at this parking lot, I found this fancy old car with a serene beautiful dog looking straight back at me.
It let me take lots of pictures. I have selected this one because the dog looks so human and the perfect companion for his master, who must adore him or her.
The sun was blinding me, and this is the result, a little Surrealist quick pic.
Source: The perfect companion Photo by Myriam Beatriz Mahiques — National Geographic Your Shot

Traveling through Cuba – in a 1950 Chevrolet.

Image Credit: Photograph and caption by Lorraine Yip / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest
Traveling through Cuba in a vintage 1950 Chevrolet with a speedometer which no longer works.
We were passing by the city of Camagey known for its winding streets.
The modern American Hawaiian hula figure and yellow taxi cab sign on the dashboard adds to the time travel-esque element of the classic Chevrolet, set against the backdrop of an old and perhaps dilapidated , but not forgotten, Cuba.
Source: 10 Stunning Portraits from the 2017 Nat Geo Travel Photographer of the Year Contest «TwistedSifter

World Solar Car Challenge 2017.

Image Credit: Photograph by Mark Kolbe / Getty Images
The University Tokai Challenger vehicle from Japan races on Day 2 of the 2017 Bridgestone World Solar Challenge in Elliott, Australia.
Teams from across the globe are competing in the 2017 World Solar Challenge — a 3,000-kilometre solar-powered vehicle race between Darwin, Northern Territory  and Adelaide, South Australia.
Source: 22 Of The Most Powerful Photos Of This Week

Vintage photos of Car Culture in the 1920s-1930s.

Pictured: A Washington DC filling station in 1924. I get the feeling that a number of the onlookers were invited along for the photograph.
Image Credit: Shorpy.

Pictured: A Car Crash in Washington DC, circa 1921.

Pictured: A wonderful photograph of life around a country store and filling station in Gordonton, North Carolina, circa 1939.
Image Credit: Shorpy