Vintage photos of Car Culture in the 1920s-1930s.

Pictured: A Washington DC filling station in 1924. I get the feeling that a number of the onlookers were invited along for the photograph.
Image Credit: Shorpy.

Pictured: A Car Crash in Washington DC, circa 1921.

Pictured: A wonderful photograph of life around a country store and filling station in Gordonton, North Carolina, circa 1939.
Image Credit: Shorpy

A 1937 Chrysler Imperial trapped by Trees.

Trees grow through the windshield of a 1937 Chrysler Imperial as it sits at Old Car City, the world’s largest known classic car junkyard, in White, Georgia.
Many of the cars have never moved in over 30 years and in some cases, trees now grow through them, even lifting some off the ground.
Image Credit: Photograph by David Goldman / AP
Source: A Walk in the Woods: A Photo Appreciation of Trees – The Atlantic

Gangster Squad ’39, Chevrolet Master Deluxe.

Gangster Squad ’39.
This Chevrolet Master Deluxe is the result of a partnership combining the graphic art of tattoo and graffiti artist Mister Cartoon and the “film noir style” of Gangster Squad (2013), a film directed by Ruben Fleischer.
Source: Whips so cold: the lowriders that are now museum pieces – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian

Vintage Cars of the Forest.

vintage-car-abandoned-2All images courtesy of DARKstyle Pictures
Lying on a blanket of Autumn leaves, these captivating scenes of abandoned vintage cars caught the attention of an urban explorer and photographer known online as DARKstyle Pictures, whose discoveries we’ve featured before on Urban Ghosts.
It’s unclear whether they’re part of a collection awaiting restoration or the unfortunate occupants of some forgotten vehicle graveyard.
Either way, the vintage machines make for an impressive series of images.
An enthusiast’s dream, all the cars pictured were found to be in the clutches of decay, though some were clearly in significantly better shape than others.
Among the collectible machines was a 1948 Jaguar XK120 racing car bearing the number ‘218’ and a name plate identifying its one-time participation in the historic Rallye Bavaria.
Elsewhere, the peeling red paintwork of another corroding classic bore the unmistakable form of a faded Iron Cross emblazoned on the door.
Read the full Article via Urban Ghosts6 Haunting Photographs of Abandoned Vintage Cars Lying in a Forest – Urban Ghosts

Jaywalking wasn’t a problem until the introduction of the Car, circa 1906.


Before the invention of the car, jaywalking wasn’t a recognized concept.
Want to get across the street? Then just walk across the street—nobody’s going to stop you.
But the rise of the automobile posed a new problem for people of the early 20th century. While the median state-designated speed limit for American cities was just 10 miles per hour in 1906, the pace of American streets soon increased enough that people who wanted to cross them were suddenly putting themselves in harm’s way.
So cities across the U.S. started to regulate where and when pedestrians could cross.
Despite the clear mortal danger, these regulations were pretty broadly ignored until motorists and police started using an even more powerful force than law: ridicule.


In his 2007 paper, “Street Rivals: Jaywalking and the Invention of the Motor Age Street,” Peter D. Norton describes how ridicule was recognized early on as the best socializing force to control pedestrian behavior—behavior that would have to change with the times. Laws might help regulate pedestrians, but when there are too few police officers and too many citizens, there needs to be a radical shift in public attitude if a given law is deemed too radical for its time.
For instance, a law that would restrict how a person could do something as basic as crossing the street.
Read on via The Invention of Jaywalking Was a Massive Shaming Campaign.

Retro Ride through Cuba in a vintage 1950 Chevrolet.

Image Credit: Photograph and caption by Lorraine Yip / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest
Traveling through Cuba in a vintage 1950 Chevrolet with a speedometer which no longer works.
We were passing by the city of Camagey known for its winding streets.
The modern American Hawaiian hula figure and yellow taxi cab sign on the dashboard adds to the time travel-esque element of the classic Chevrolet, set against the backdrop of an old and perhaps dilapidated , but not forgotten, Cuba.
Source: 10 Stunning Portraits from the 2017 Nat Geo Travel Photographer of the Year Contest «TwistedSifter