“Ice Cave Refuge.”

Image Credit: Photograph by Andrew Robertson, United Kingdom, Commended, Open, Nature (Photo: 2017 Sony World Photography Awards)
“The Auyuittuq National Park on Baffin Island, Canada is a complete wilderness.
“The only refuge I found on my two-week trek was this ice cave at the foot of the Turner Glacier,” writes photographer Andrew Robertson of the United Kingdom”.
Source: 12 breathtaking images from the Sony World Photography Awards | MNN – Mother Nature Network

“Two White Bears” by Gilardini.

A cub escapes deep snow by hitching a ride on its mother’s backside in Wapusk National Park, Manitoba, Canada.
Photo taken by Daisy Gilardini, from Switzerland.
The photo is one of 25 shortlisted for the People’s Choice Award in the latest Wildlife Photographer of the Year Competition.
Source: Wildlife Photographer of the Year – People’s Choice – BBC News

Sinister Pics by Kazanjian.

untitledStation_2014Inspired in part by the classic horror literature of H.P. Lovecraft, artist Jim Kazanjian (previously) assembles foreboding buildings using snippets of photographs found in the Library of Congress archives.
Equal parts secret lair, insane asylum, and the work of a deranged architect, Kazanjian’s collages are created from 50-70 separate photographs taken over the last century.
Each piece takes nearly three months to complete as he painstakingly searches for just the right elements, a process he likens to “solving a puzzle, except in reverse.” From his artist statement:
I’ve chosen photography as a medium because of the cultural misunderstanding that it has a sort of built-in objectivity. This allows me to set up a visual tension within the work, to make it resonate and lure the viewer further inside.
My current series is inspired by the classic horror literature of H.P. Lovecraft, Algernon Blackwood and similar authors.
I am intrigued with the narrative archetypes these writers utilize to transform the commonplace into something sinister and foreboding. In my work, I prefer to use these devices as a means to generate entry points for the viewer. I’m interested in occupying a space where the mundane intersects the strange, and the familiar becomes alien.
In a sense, I am attempting to render the sublime.
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You can see much more of Kazanjian’s work on his website, and at Jennifer Kostuik Gallery in Vancouver later this year. (via Colossal Submissions)
via Sinister Architecture Constructed from Archival Library of Congress Images by Jim Kazanjian | Colossal.

“Only the Owls Know the Answer”.

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I have heard it said by wise people that birds are the only creatures who can truly answer a difficult riddle.
Perhaps it is because they are used to seeing everything from above — and, when they land, from below. That double perspective is the key to their peculiar understanding.
This is a detail from a much larger picture by Rebecca Yanovskaya, an artist and illustrator in Toronto.
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You can see more of her magnificent work on Rebecca’s website.
http://bit.ly/VYah26
via Only the Owls Know the Answer to Your Riddle.

I Love Quebec City.

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Rue St. Louis – Photograph by Susan Seubert
Keith Bellows, Editor in Chief, National Geographic Travel
When I was growing up, Quebec City was something of an also-ran compared to Montreal, its brasher, more idiosyncratic sibling and my hometown. My family would often drive the 150 miles up the St. Lawrence River to Quebec City, and as a kid I recall coming away a little underwhelmed. It seemed so dutiful and reserved next to the “sin city,” as Montreal was known. Sure, Quebec City could lay claim to a marginally more storied history—symbolized by the star-shaped Citadelle and the once bloody Plains of Abraham, where the British and French clashed over control of what would become Canada. But next to Montreal it lacked panache.
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Notre-Dame de Quebec – Photograph by Susan Seubert
No more. These days the cities have reached a comfortable détente over which has the most to offer. They are simply different. Quebec City’s warren of cobblestone streets, hulking Fairmont Le Château Frontenac, and Upper and Lower Towns are backdrop to its francophone fashion shops, chansons echoing off centuries-old cut-stone buildings, and air heavy with thick Québécois accents—a combination that’s unique in all North America. The food has gone from pedestrian to a superbly traditional force of gustatory nature (many dishes draw on local ingredients).
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Raclette – Photograph by Susan Seubert
When it turned 400 years old in 2008, Quebec City also seemed to turn a corner. Now it is a truly modern city with old bones. My advice: Learn a little French, try it out on the residents, and you’ll enter a world where the locals will help you unlock the keys to street-level Old France.

See more via I Heart Quebec City — National Geographic.

“Frozen Bubbles.”

bdd2e3a3-8784-441a-b351-339487574d38-1420x2040Photographed in Banff National Park in Alberta, Canada, the bubbles are made from highly flammable gas methane.  Paul Zizka/Caters News Agency
Methane gas bubbles underneath Vermillion Lakes in Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada.
Normally the bubbles would break the surface but in low temperatures they freeze.
50182f8a-a0e6-4dde-913c-580f1842a67f-2060x1363The gas, which is emitted by bacteria after they consume dead organic matter, is fairly harmless but the bubbles can cause an explosion if lit.
3202f1bd-2e7f-4893-a332-251560c268ff-1329x2040Vermilion Lakes are a series of lakes located in the Canadian Rocky Mountains.
See more Images via Frozen bubbles in Canadian lakes – in pictures | World news | The Guardian.