Under Threat: The Solitary Jaguar.

catsouth_1a
Jaguar (image via: Awesome-Desktop/S.K.)
The Jaguar (Panthera Onca) is the third-largest of the four big cats in the genus Panthera, and the only living member native to the western hemisphere.
Growing up to 160 kg (350 lb), Jaguars are distinguished by rosette-emblazoned fur, comparatively short tails and an exceptionally powerful bite that enables them to successfully prey on armored reptiles such as caimans and turtles.

catsouth_1b

(Images via: Fanpop and WWF/Go Wild)
Jaguars are stated to be Near Threatened by the IUCN and while their current range is roughly half of what it once was, these often solitary big cats can still be found from southern Arizona in the United States down to Paraguay and northern Argentina.

jag1

Source: Rio Meow: 9 Amazing Wild Cats Of South America – WebEcoist

Kai and Sita on Tiger Island, Gold Coast.

6754982-3x2-940x627

Kai, a six-week-old tiger cub, nuzzles 16-year-old Sita on Tiger Island at Dreamworld on the Gold Coast, Queensland.
Kai was the first tiger in seven years to be born at the Dreamworld Complex.
Image Credit: Photograph by AAP: Dave Hunt
Source: Tiger cub – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Leopard on the Lookout in Kruger National Park, South Africa.

2835
An ever watchful leopard poses on a tree trunk in the magnificent Kruger National Park, South Africa.
Image Credit: Photograph by Greatstock/Barcroft Images
See more images via The week in wildlife – in pictures | Environment | The Guardian

To Stay Alive Leopards have to be Crafty Big Cats.

Where there are people, expect to find few leopards. That’s because the apex predator suffers from man hunting for their pelts, from habitat loss and fragmentation, and from retaliatory killings due to real or imagined losses of human or livestock lives.
Similarly, where there are tigers, expect to find few leopards. In this case, it’s because the two big cats compete for the same prey, and in most cases the tigers are socially dominant to the leopards.
Despite the odds stacked against them, leopards are actually quite widespread, ranging from Africa up through the Middle East and into southern and Southeast Asia.
So how do leopards manage to eke out their existence when they’re forced to contend with competition from other cats and a mix of aggression and habitat loss from humans?
New research from National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center researcher Neil Carter and colleagues suggests that leopards employ different strategies to deal with the different sorts of threats posted by humans and by tigers.
The study took place in Nepal’s Chitwan National Park, which contains leopards and tigers as well as a veritable buffet of prey species on which the cats regularly dine: spotted deer, muntjac, hog deer, sambar deer, gaur (also known as Indian bison), and wild boar.
Carter collected his data primarily by using camera traps in the dry seasons of 2010 and 2011, deployed both within the park and within a forested area just outside the park in the “buffer zone” between the park and human settlements.
Read on further via To avoid multiple threats, leopards have to be crafty cats – Conservation.

White Bengal Tiger & her Cub, Zoo Liberee, Czech Republic.

article-2198011-14D16D54000005DC-349_964x806White tigers are so rare that only one in every 10,000 Bengal tigers is born white with black stripes and a pink nose.
So when cubs are born in captivity, the white youngsters proved to be cute, black and white miracles.
But, unfortunately these tigers find it difficult to hunt in the wild because they are poorly camouflaged compared to other tigers.
The cubs are living with their mother Surya Bara in ZOO Liberec in the Czech Republic.
article-2198011-14D16D4A000005DC-778_964x1462
via White Bengal tiger triplets: Born in ZOO Liberec in Czech Republic | Mail Online.

Two White Tiger Babies from a group of Sextuplets, Yunnan Zoo, China.

Two of a group of white tiger sextuplets are photographed at the Yunnan Zoo in Kunming, China.
Image Credit: Photograph by Veg/Getty Images,
According to the zoo, white tigers usually give birth to two or three cubs, and the sextuplets are considered very rare.
via 22 Of The Most Powerful Photos Of This Week