To Stay Alive Leopards have to be Crafty Big Cats.

Where there are people, expect to find few leopards. That’s because the apex predator suffers from man hunting for their pelts, from habitat loss and fragmentation, and from retaliatory killings due to real or imagined losses of human or livestock lives.
Similarly, where there are tigers, expect to find few leopards. In this case, it’s because the two big cats compete for the same prey, and in most cases the tigers are socially dominant to the leopards.
Despite the odds stacked against them, leopards are actually quite widespread, ranging from Africa up through the Middle East and into southern and Southeast Asia.
So how do leopards manage to eke out their existence when they’re forced to contend with competition from other cats and a mix of aggression and habitat loss from humans?
New research from National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center researcher Neil Carter and colleagues suggests that leopards employ different strategies to deal with the different sorts of threats posted by humans and by tigers.
The study took place in Nepal’s Chitwan National Park, which contains leopards and tigers as well as a veritable buffet of prey species on which the cats regularly dine: spotted deer, muntjac, hog deer, sambar deer, gaur (also known as Indian bison), and wild boar.
Carter collected his data primarily by using camera traps in the dry seasons of 2010 and 2011, deployed both within the park and within a forested area just outside the park in the “buffer zone” between the park and human settlements.
Read on further via To avoid multiple threats, leopards have to be crafty cats – Conservation.

Black & White Pics of Big Cats.

Joe-Zammit-Lucia01Portraits of animals in solid black backgrounds that puts them in an elegant light and captures their unique traits and personality.
Zammit-Lucia applies the techniques of human portraiture to animals to explore issues related to animal individuality, human-animal relations, and environmental and species conservation.
Joe-Zammit-Lucia08via Faith is Torment | Art and Design Blog: Photos by Joe Zammit-Lucia.

Big Cats and their ‘Rosettes’.

leopard2

Large spotted cats have preyed on primates for millennia. Even today leopards cause many human deaths in Africa and the Indian subcontinent.
A rosette is a rose-like marking or formation found on the fur and skin of some animals, particularly cats of the family Felidae. Rosettes are used to camouflage the animal, either as a defense mechanism or as a stalking tool.
Predators use their rosettes to simulate the different shifting of shadows and shade, helping the animals to remain hidden from their prey. Rosettes can be grouped in clusters around other spots, or may appear as blotches on the fur.
Rosettes can appear with or without central spots.
Leopard (Smaller and more dense compared to those of a Jaguar and without central spots).
leopard
Shot by Steve Winter in Sabi Sands, South Africa.
via Discover and National Geographic.